Colicing Over and Over Again ... - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
 11Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 21 Old 01-04-2013, 04:18 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 198
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205 View Post
The only thing I disagree with there is the deworming. If you live in an area with high prevalence of tapeworms, yo uneed to deworm at least once a year anyway with something that will deal with those. If you have deer, you probably have tapes. Also encysted strongyles are a big dangerous problem as well. I give Quest once a year and Quest Plus ohnce a year to be absolutely SURE my horse is cleaned out and free of those two things. Ivemectin based dewormers do not kill encysted strongyles. Only a powerpak or Quest will. Fecals wont show either.

ETA, Encysted Strongyles are particularly insidious. They really damage the digestive system and Can be the cause of colic as well as mal-absorption and the damage over time done can end up being the horses death. I will always preventatively deworm for these two things until there is research to prove something else is better. My vet agrees with me.
Except with a horse that has colic issues. After our mare had colic we were not permitted to worm until everything settled down.
Posted via Mobile Device
66Domino is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 21 Old 01-04-2013, 04:47 PM
Green Broke
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Middle Tennessee
Posts: 4,472
• Horses: 0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205 View Post
The only thing I disagree with there is the deworming. If you live in an area with high prevalence of tapeworms, yo uneed to deworm at least once a year anyway with something that will deal with those. If you have deer, you probably have tapes. Also encysted strongyles are a big dangerous problem as well. I give Quest once a year and Quest Plus ohnce a year to be absolutely SURE my horse is cleaned out and free of those two things. Ivemectin based dewormers do not kill encysted strongyles. Only a powerpak or Quest will. Fecals wont show either.

ETA, Encysted Strongyles are particularly insidious. They really damage the digestive system and Can be the cause of colic as well as mal-absorption and the damage over time done can end up being the horses death. I will always preventatively deworm for these two things until there is research to prove something else is better. My vet agrees with me.
If that was in response to my comments, I don't want folks thinking I meant do not de-worm

Do not de-worm without doing fecals, even if that means sending samples to the vet once a month. It's a hairy/fine line dealing with a horse that didn't use to colic and suddenly you can't even say the word in front of them.

When I worm my horse above, next week with the Ivermectin my vet said to use, I will literally have the 4-wheeler beside the house, aimed at the gate, in case I have to get to the pasture and give him Banamine. He and his buds will once again be shut out of the nine acres where they like to do a disappearing act, up on the ridge behind the trees, for the entire day. It's buckin' cold outside and I want them in the 10 acres I can see from inside the house

We haven't heard from the OP -- how are things??
Trinity3205 likes this.

A Good Horseman Doesn't Have To Tell Anyone; The Horse Already Knows.
walkinthewalk is online now  
post #13 of 21 Old 01-04-2013, 06:06 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Sevierville, TN
Posts: 1,639
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by 66Domino View Post
Except with a horse that has colic issues. After our mare had colic we were not permitted to worm until everything settled down.
Posted via Mobile Device
Unless its the worms causing the colics...Happens. Your vet will tell you what to do. My advise was for avoiding worm issues that can contribute to colic.
walkinthewalk likes this.

Married to my One! 10-11-13 Steampunk style:)
Trinity3205 is offline  
post #14 of 21 Old 01-05-2013, 12:46 PM
Weanling
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Minnesota, USA
Posts: 406
• Horses: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk View Post
1.5 Last and far from least, put your horse on Succeed if you can possibly afford it.

SUCCEED Digestive Conditioning Program Equine Supplement This stuff smells like cookie dough and my horse eats either in meal form or he will try and grab the tube out of my hand. Taste great and works - what a concept

I can't say enough about this expensive stuff ($90/month The vet was here for another horse December 18th. Free-of-charge, he re-examined all my horses because they're up there in years and all have an "issue".

The vet told me to keep my colicy horse on the Succeed because it seems to be doing its job. Also to keep feeding his feed pan stuff three times a day, even though it's only rice bran and some timothy/alfalfa cubes in the AM because he is now a hard keeper.

1.6 Plenty of quality grass hay and if hay is in short supply buy straight timothy pellets as a filler. You could measure out one dry pound and soak them a little bit to get more moisture into his gut. These horses need a lot of moisture in their digestive system. I wet everything that goes into the feed pan, each and every time.

Just feed one pound at a time as it seems my horse cannot handle much more than 1 - 1-1/2 pounds of something in his feed pan, at one time.

It's not as complex as it sounds - I am sorry I'm not good at explaining things.

The bottom line is feed him more often but little amounts, get him off anything grain and soy, lots of good hay, and Succeed, even it's only to get him thru the winter months.

Do not deworm this horse without doing fecals and let the vet recommend what to use. Naturally the horse I am talking about is my only horse that shed enough to need wormed. The vet told me to wait until our cold & fickle weather levels out to worm him and to use pure Ivermectin. Worming happens next week if the weatherman is correct.

I hope this helps and best of luck getting him squared away
I was going to recommend Succeed as well. My mare was experiencing near constant low grade gas colic for several weeks. We tried everything - probiotics, aloe, treated for ulcers, more frequent feedings, etc. Nothing helped. Three days into treating with Succeed, and she was back to normal.

Yes, it is quite expensive (around $100 a month), but you may find that one month is all you need to get your horse's hind gut issues sorted out, and from there, you may be able to keep him healthy and happy with just a probiotic and a quality diet.
DraftXDressage is offline  
post #15 of 21 Old 01-06-2013, 08:03 AM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 1,425
• Horses: 2
My horse has coliced twice....nephrospelnic entrapments, one of them requiring surgery. After the 2nd bout, I put him on Neighlox and it has done wonders to help keep things "right" in his belly. I highly recommend it.
GotaDunQH is offline  
post #16 of 21 Old 01-18-2013, 08:24 PM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: The Bluegrass State
Posts: 1,623
• Horses: 3
First off, I do apologize GREATLY for seeming to have dissapeared. I for some reason thought this post didn't go through, and therefore didn't exist. I'm glad to see that it does, though!!

Okay, I also apologize for not having better organization, but I'm going to try to answer all questions in a short heap.
He has been doing quite well lately :) My farrier (we are in the process of getting a new vet. The one we have is never going to work) said that it was likely a water intake issue. Since then, we've been salting his grain a bit, and added a good amount of probiotics. He has been doing very well. Drinking more and everything! He has had a bit of a history with ulcers... We are going down to the Equine Hospital a ways away soon to get him scooped for tumors, ulcers, etc. He also has Roaring, which we will also be looking at, to see the severity of it.
No, Cowboy is not a cribber :) He does eat his hay pretty quickly though, so you think a slow feeder would help?

Also, on the topic of grain... He is a typical TB, and isn't super easy to keep weight on. He also gets hoof supplements through his grain, which he could really use/need. So not sure exactly how that would work out ... I'm hoping the Equine Hospital can give us some definite answers on exactly what to do.

But again, I want to thank each and every one of you for your replies :) I will be responding more quickly this time.

ADD: Cowboy has the whole day (7:00 AM - 5:00 PM) in the winter outside, and even longer (7:00 AM - 7:00 PM) in the summer. Out there they have grass, and I throw small piles of hay in the winter out there in the mornings. 24/7 access to water, of course.
walkinthewalk likes this.

~ When I Die, Remember Me By My Horses ~
* Because They Are Responsible *
.: For Letting Me Live :. (c) xJumperx

Last edited by xJumperx; 01-18-2013 at 08:31 PM.
xJumperx is offline  
post #17 of 21 Old 01-18-2013, 08:40 PM
Foal
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Eastern Connecticut
Posts: 120
• Horses: 1
Whats Gas Colic?

I hear allot of people say gas colic is caused by bad hay. What exactly is gas colic?
The only advice I have for a colicky horse is to give them lots of hay and don't let them roll or run around. If you separate his grain rations into 3-5 meals a day instead of say 1-2, that will help stop acid build up in his digestive tract.
1322271927queen is offline  
post #18 of 21 Old 01-18-2013, 11:04 PM
Showing
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 12,519
• Horses: 0
Hi again,

Quote:
Originally Posted by xJumperx View Post
was likely a water intake issue. Since then, we've been salting his grain a bit, and added a good amount of probiotics.
What made your farrier suspect a 'water intake issue'? Are you in a salt deficient area or have you done at least a basic diet analysis which shows he's low in sodium? If not, I would not be adding salt to his feed(he could already be getting too much, who knows without analysis) but if you're unsure, providing free access to loose salt that he can 'dose' himself with if/as needed is a good idea.

Quote:
He has had a bit of a history with ulcers... ... He does eat his hay pretty quickly though, so you think a slow feeder would help?
I would definitely avoid grain or other high starch feeds if he's got ulcers. Yes, a slow feeder would help & feeding whatever hardfeed over a number(3 or more as you can manage) of small feeds a day will help.

Quote:
Also, on the topic of grain... He is a typical TB, and isn't super easy to keep weight on. He also gets hoof supplements through his grain
Yes, 'typical TB's', I suspect, are 'hard keepers' generally due to ulcers, acidosis & other gut or metabolic issues, of which grain/high carb feeds can cause or worsen. Also people often feed these diets in large &/or infrequent rich 'meals' rather than little & often is also problematic for their GI tract. So while he may need extra weight, grain is generally not the best option, especially if you already know he's got gut probs. Beet pulp, rice bran, soy hulls, alfalfa & many other feeds are high energy but low in sugar, so are good 'conditioning' alternatives. Yes, good *appropriate*(considering what's in his diet already) nutritional supplementation is a very good idea IMO.
loosie is offline  
post #19 of 21 Old 01-19-2013, 01:24 PM Thread Starter
Started
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: The Bluegrass State
Posts: 1,623
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie View Post
What made your farrier suspect a 'water intake issue'? Are you in a salt deficient area or have you done at least a basic diet analysis which shows he's low in sodium? If not, I would not be adding salt to his feed(he could already be getting too much, who knows without analysis) but if you're unsure, providing free access to loose salt that he can 'dose' himself with if/as needed is a good idea.
She said this because it is winter, and the horses aren't drinking as much. Which I figured was true - Cowboy is a lot like me in the sense that we don't drink a lot of water usually. I can put a salt block out in the field instead of putting a bit in his feed though, that's not a problem.

Quote:
Yes, 'typical TB's', I suspect, are 'hard keepers' generally due to ulcers, acidosis & other gut or metabolic issues, of which grain/high carb feeds can cause or worsen. Also people often feed these diets in large &/or infrequent rich 'meals' rather than little & often is also problematic for their GI tract. So while he may need extra weight, grain is generally not the best option, especially if you already know he's got gut probs. Beet pulp, rice bran, soy hulls, alfalfa & many other feeds are high energy but low in sugar, so are good 'conditioning' alternatives. Yes, good *appropriate*(considering what's in his diet already) nutritional supplementation is a very good idea IMO.
Thank you for those suggestions!! I did try it out last night, and he does quite like the taste of his hoof supplement, and it is in a large pellet form, so he could just eat that without the grain pretty easily. So find a low suger feed? Or just give him alfalfa? That might be difficult, the latter, only because Alfalfa hay is pretty darn expensive, and we aren't high in funds ... but the other options are likely very possible.

Thank you, thank you, thank you!!

~ When I Die, Remember Me By My Horses ~
* Because They Are Responsible *
.: For Letting Me Live :. (c) xJumperx
xJumperx is offline  
post #20 of 21 Old 01-19-2013, 02:12 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 5,685
• Horses: 0
Best way to get water in a horse in winter is offer twice or three times daily tepid water in a bucket. You'll be surprised how they just suck it in.
Slowfeeder haynet will help, definitely.
And what loosie mentioned for "grain/sweetfeed" are fed instead of grains, so are not higher in price.
Posted via Mobile Device
deserthorsewoman is offline  
Reply

Tags
colic , colicing , habitual colic

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Neighbor's horse is colicing, and no one is home Taffy Clayton Horse Health 18 07-13-2012 07:08 PM
Colicing horse??? Need advice fast please xilikeggs0 Horse Health 4 12-27-2011 10:06 PM
Mare colicing now! Help! Urgent! Update: Sadly, She didnt' make it. Cocoa Horse Health 34 09-06-2011 12:27 PM
Horse was colicing at the ranch today. ???? HalfPass Horse Health 9 06-26-2009 11:10 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome