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Is this colt growing properly?

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  • Yearlings front feet not growing correctly

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    02-19-2013, 08:02 PM
  #11
Started
If the video is of him at 8 months, then he looks very immature.
Longing the thing for hours at a time is seriously bad, and could seriously affect the development of his legs unless it is stopped immediately.

I think the best advice if you want to adopt the guy, is to put him in a large pasture with a couple docile mares and let him "detox" from humans for a month or so. I think if you take him home and try to "fix" his trainer problems right away, he will become very frustrated and unhappy.

He needs some good feed and some good hay and some good mares to teach him some manners. Once my filly starts acting onery when I'm working with her, I know it's time for some baby detox. I put her in the pasture for several weeks and don't touch her, just to get the frustrations and bad attitude out of her mind. When I bring her back in, she is much more willing and "refreshed".
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    02-19-2013, 08:09 PM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
If the video is of him at 8 months, then he looks very immature.
Longing the thing for hours at a time is seriously bad, and could seriously affect the development of his legs unless it is stopped immediately.

I think the best advice if you want to adopt the guy, is to put him in a large pasture with a couple docile mares and let him "detox" from humans for a month or so. I think if you take him home and try to "fix" his trainer problems right away, he will become very frustrated and unhappy.

He needs some good feed and some good hay and some good mares to teach him some manners. Once my filly starts acting onery when I'm working with her, I know it's time for some baby detox. I put her in the pasture for several weeks and don't touch her, just to get the frustrations and bad attitude out of her mind. When I bring her back in, she is much more willing and "refreshed".
Like I said, I am rescuing him. I know the lunging is bad, it's one of the many reasons I'm trying to get him out of the home. I've tried to explain it to this guy, but he is headstrong, and thinks he knows everything. When I tried explaining to him that the pressure point on hi nose is not a good way to control him, he continued to do it until it was bruised and tender to the touch.

He was separated from his mother early, has had no other contact with horses, and is in the hands of a potentially dangerous owner. And unfortunately, he is in this horrible situation for a bit longer until I can pull a bit more money together to get him out of it. That is IF I can convince him to sell/give it to me.
     
    02-19-2013, 08:14 PM
  #13
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
If the video is of him at 8 months, then he looks very immature.
Longing the thing for hours at a time is seriously bad, and could seriously affect the development of his legs unless it is stopped immediately.

I think the best advice if you want to adopt the guy, is to put him in a large pasture with a couple docile mares and let him "detox" from humans for a month or so. I think if you take him home and try to "fix" his trainer problems right away, he will become very frustrated and unhappy.

He needs some good feed and some good hay and some good mares to teach him some manners. Once my filly starts acting onery when I'm working with her, I know it's time for some baby detox. I put her in the pasture for several weeks and don't touch her, just to get the frustrations and bad attitude out of her mind. When I bring her back in, she is much more willing and "refreshed".
Also, every one of your ideas are great. They go along with the plan I have for him if I can get him.
Step 1: Geld him (he wants his little girl to break him, AND keep him a breeding stallion)
Step 2: Release him in a turn out with a few older horses, and a few his age for a few months. In that time, the only work he will be doing is halter, leading, picking up feet, and trailering training.
Step 3: After he seems to get a typical herd mentality, then I will train him how he should be for his age. I have never had a foal before, but I WILL call a trainer for every snag I come into.
     
    02-19-2013, 08:15 PM
  #14
Green Broke
The thread "Adopting a foal" began on 2/14, and there are 3 pages of heartfelt replies to the many awful abuse/neglect descriptions you gave, and your last post on the thread you said you forgot you had made yet a previous thread about the topic - quite a few of us spent a lot of time and effort trying to encourage you and answer your questions about this little guy! I'm more than a little concerned about the fact there's now a 3rd thread, and no adoption? What's going on?
     
    02-19-2013, 08:25 PM
  #15
Weanling
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I'll get the new video up as soon as I can
     
    02-19-2013, 08:31 PM
  #16
Started
Those front feet are bad. I don't think you need anyone to tell you he's having a rough go at life. He looks like a foal, not an 8 month old. You can look at pictures of my 9 month old filly to tell the difference, even though she's bred to be big.

I don't think this is a case of whether or not you should take on this horse, or whether or not he has problems - you should, and he does. It's a matter of when.

How much money are you thinking of offering (if you don't mind me asking)? Where would you be relocating him, or are you still looking?
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    02-19-2013, 08:44 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
Those front feet are bad. I don't think you need anyone to tell you he's having a rough go at life. He looks like a foal, not an 8 month old. You can look at pictures of my 9 month old filly to tell the difference, even though she's bred to be big.

I don't think this is a case of whether or not you should take on this horse, or whether or not he has problems - you should, and he does. It's a matter of when.

How much money are you thinking of offering (if you don't mind me asking)? Where would you be relocating him, or are you still looking?
He has turned the foal in to a monster. Strangely, he love me and is an angel, but I've seen his bad side. Im hoping that by the time I hav the money put together, he will just want to give it away to get away from it. If not, I'll start with $100 and slowly work my way up. If he wants more than $500, he is insane, but I've already come to that conclusion. I will be moving to Auburn, WA, near Seattle. I already have three boarding centers I found and like.
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    02-19-2013, 08:51 PM
  #18
Started
I know your intentions are good, but just be prepared for the fact that you can't reason with "crazy". Getting your heart broken sucks, but that's the way the horse world works sometimes. It's not fair.

If I was you, I'd stalk him after a bad session. Or if the horse ever accidentally hurts his daughter. Then swoop on in and ask to take that little pony off his hands for free. He might be more emotionally inclined.

But I just worry that you won't have the financial resources to pay for board, vet care, and farrier work if putting together $100 is difficult. No offense, just thinking for the future. There's no such thing as a free horse.
     
    02-19-2013, 08:56 PM
  #19
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by oh vair oh    
I know your intentions are good, but just be prepared for the fact that you can't reason with "crazy". Getting your heart broken sucks, but that's the way the horse world works sometimes. It's not fair.

If I was you, I'd stalk him after a bad session. Or if the horse ever accidentally hurts his daughter. Then swoop on in and ask to take that little pony off his hands for free. He might be more emotionally inclined.

But I just worry that you won't have the financial resources to pay for board, vet care, and farrier work if putting together $100 is difficult. No offense, just thinking for the future. There's no such thing as a free horse.
My exactly. And no, getting $100 isnt difficult. I'm just not going to pay $10,000 for him of you know what I mean. The less I spend on him, the more luxery of a life I can give him. I've had another horse before. He was a hard keeper, demanded the most expensive hay available, and I had $1500 worth of tack stolen from me. He never went without vet or farrier care. Even with that, I had money to spare.
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    02-19-2013, 08:57 PM
  #20
Weanling
*My point exactly. Sorry I am on my smartphone, and it likes to jumble my words.
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