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Confused about deworming?

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        07-28-2010, 07:11 PM
      #11
    Yearling
    Ok sorry Ryle, my vet is wrong again. Gee, whereever did she get her education? Walmart? I will let her know she told me wrong.

    I dare say that east Texas certainly has MUCH different weather than northern MN. Up here, its frigging cold. Cold enough that most people from TX that come visit in winter never come back.

    And here is a PDF from the Horse.com that says Freezing KILLS Small Strongyle eggs.

    http://www.thehorse.com/Parasites/Parasites0404.pdf

    Please see the paragraph right where it says "The Climate Controlled Worm".

    So while YOUR strongyle eggs might gleefully overwinter, ours do not. We deworm after the first killing frost, and our horses enjoy a 7-8 month break from parasite infestation.
         
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        07-28-2010, 07:49 PM
      #12
    Yearling
    "Larvae die fairly rapidly at temperatures 90F,
    But at the other extreme, third-stage larvae tolerate
    Freezing well.
    23 The purported pasture cleansing

    Effect of “killing frost” during winter is a myth."--
    Controlling Strongyle Parasites of Horses:
    A Mandate for Change
    Craig R. Reinemeyer, DVM, PhD
    Dec. 2009 AAEP meeting proceedings

    "Many owners think a harsh, cold winter will rid the pasture of parasites, but experts say that is not the case. "There is no such thing as a 'killing frost' for most of these parasites," says Martin K. Nielsen, DVM, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Large Animal Sciences at Denmark's University of Copenhagen. "Some larvae survive longer in cold winters (than hot sum-mers).""

    And

    ""The immature larvae can survive for months on pasture under ice and snow," Taylor says. "When the right temperature occurs in the spring, they become infective.""


    ---http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=16281

    "The embryonated (strongyle) eggs tolerate low temperatures (even freezing), which will only delay further development (Uhlinger, 1991). --Prevelance and Control of Strongyle Nematode Infections of Horses in Sweden (Doctoral Thesis)
    Eva Osterman Lind
    Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    http://diss-epsilon.slu.se:8080/arch...ll_Epsilon.pdf


    Yes, you enjoy a long break from parasites because your temperatures are such for long periods that you have very few parasites maturing into infective 3rd stage larva. This is because the rate of maturation is directly proportional to the temperatures. The colder it is, down to 45 degrees, the longer it takes for an egg to mature into the infective L3 so you will have a much longer period from the time when eggs are shed to when they will be able to reinfect a horse and lead to adult parasites to shed eggs in the feces.
         
        07-29-2010, 09:27 AM
      #13
    Yearling
    For every link you find, I can find another that disputes it.

    I am going to follow the advice of MY vet, who graduated from Cornell, who works hands on with MY horses, and who I trust.
         
        07-29-2010, 09:45 AM
      #14
    Started
    I agree Draftrider, guess my vet is wrong also, Washington state must not teach their vets anything either. Am curious Ryle, do you actually have hands on experience with horses or just spend your time quoting stuff from the internet? Article after article is posted to the forum, yet have never heard one experience of actual hands on. Does your vet approve of you telling the rest of us our vets are stupid?
    Do you ever think anyone might be right compared to you, or do you just enjoy trying to show how much knowledge you have?
    We worm in the spring after 6 months of cold, below zero freezing snow and again in the fall after the first freeze. I change wormers each time.Maybe Ivermect then Anthelcide, etc.
    Living in Wyoming, we have more months of snow and cold then we do heat. Utah will probably be the same weather circumstances concerning worming, although you do get a bit more heat and longer also.
         
        07-29-2010, 09:53 AM
      #15
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by draftrider    

    I am going to follow the advice of MY vet, who graduated from Cornell, who works hands on with MY horses, and who I trust.
    I totally agree with this!


    My vet has me doing the fecal count thing to determine my deworming schedule. Their logic makes sense to me. I even attended a little seminar they gave on it.

    I trust my vet. They know my horses and the environment they live in. I will go with what my vet says.

    With the varied conditions every where I highly doubt there is a one size fits all program for deworming every horse in ever area.
         
        07-29-2010, 10:24 AM
      #16
    Yearling
    Anyone can say anything on the internet. I could be a rich prince from Saudi Arabia with 500 Arabian stallions. Or, I could be a movie star with a hourglass figure and billions of adoring fans. I could pretend to be a doctor, or lawyer, or anything, and if I quoted enough other people then others might think I'm telling the truth.
         
        07-29-2010, 10:39 AM
      #17
    Banned
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by draftrider    
    Anyone can say anything on the internet. I could be a rich prince from Saudi Arabia with 500 Arabian stallions. Or, I could be a movie star with a hourglass figure and billions of adoring fans. I could pretend to be a doctor, or lawyer, or anything, and if I quoted enough other people then others might think I'm telling the truth.
    The trick is to take a photo of you wearing scrubs standing next to a horse and then you are a horse medical expert.
         
        07-29-2010, 10:46 AM
      #18
    mls
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by draftrider    
    Ok sorry Ryle, my vet is wrong again. Gee, whereever did she get her education? Walmart? I will let her know she told me wrong.
    We must use the same vet! Or maybe our cold winters destroy brain cells?

    There are issues are cannot be treated the same way. When my boarders tell me about something 'wonderful' and can we try it - I then have to explain why it is wonderful - for Florida or California or Texas but it won't fly in Minnesota, Wisconsin or Michigan . . .
         
        07-29-2010, 10:49 AM
      #19
    Green Broke
    I think for a first time horse owner you should consult your OWN vet as suggested by others, a fecal count does not lie and will not give you various quotes from goodness knows where on the internet. I would even follow up with another vet visit several months later to see how YOUR individual horse is progressing in the deworming treatment so you have an idea of its efficacy. It is interesting that there are a couple of vets on this forum that, whilst giving helpful information, will ALWAYS end their posts with something like 'you should consult your own vetinarian as this information is only given in a general sense'.

    P.S. Draftrider: I am a movie star with an hourglass figure and billions of adoring fans, I just keep it on the low down as I don't want to make all the rest of you minions feel bad about it
         
        07-29-2010, 10:51 AM
      #20
    Banned
    I agree with you, Sara. Well said. Talk with your vet in your area about your horse. (Not on the movie star thing though. You do not have an avatar photo that proves your greatness.)
         

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