confused horse acting lame one min not the next
 
 

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confused horse acting lame one min not the next

This is a discussion on confused horse acting lame one min not the next within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Sudden lameness horse walking down hill
  • Horse down, acting lame what to do

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  • 2 Post By Saddlebag
  • 1 Post By sheenaschlytter

 
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    09-16-2012, 08:20 PM
  #1
Foal
Question confused horse acting lame one min not the next

So today I went out to ride with my daughter. My parents decided to come to and we thought it would be nice to go on a little trail. As she is our only horse we all walked and my daughter rode. I tacked her up as usual and the only thing different about her was that she is very much in heat. She picked up all feet and looked perfect. We got my daughter on and out to the trail and everything was normal actually my horse ( rain) was very excited and happy to be out on the trail and she trotting around and my daughter had to keep her slow. So then we walk up a hill and on the way down all of a sudden she is looking completely off going down the hill in her back right leg I mean she is stumbeling and even buckling her leg a little. We are walking down a small incline. As soon as I see this I pull my daughter off and go to pick up her foot I am thinking a rock maybe and she totally kicks out at me. I figure nothing im going to do on the hill so I walk her back and untack her in the round pen. She is still acting off. But as soon as I get her tack off She sees her horse friend getting lead by runs over to her and starts galloping and cantering and playing in the round pen. I let her play and watch her leg and nothing. She looks perfect not limping nothing at all. I take her and brush her up and pick her foot ( no kicking at me ) and no rock perfectly clean.
So my question could she have been faking it, had a rock and kicked it out on her own, or could in be that she is off while going down hill only. If it is that what can I do for her.
She did founder 6 months ago according to my farrier ( I did not own her) and he said she is growing out very well and has very hard feet. He sid she will not be fully backto normal for another 3 or 4 tirms so could that effect her down hill motion. Though she foundered in front and this was the back. Im at a lost HORSES sometimes they drive me nutts but I think that's one reason I love them so much
And BTW I am so glad to find this site I haveno horse friends in the real world to ask crazy horse questions to
     
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    09-16-2012, 08:35 PM
  #2
Showing
If you were able to follow the nerve routes, you would find that front end lameness goes all the way to the back heels. If she is still a little sore in front that could account for it because going downhill she is really loading her front end. If you can't avoid hills, try going down them in a switch-back fashion going 5 or 6 strides each time. This will reduce the load on the front end.
loosie and DRichmond like this.
     
    09-16-2012, 10:15 PM
  #3
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheenaschlytter    
So my question could she have been faking it, had a rock and kicked it out on her own, or could in be that she is off while going down hill only. If it is that what can I do for her.
No, horses do not lie. It is/was real. They are however very stoic animals by nature & also much of the time minor signs of discomfort aren't noticed until they're obviously lame. I'm not a vet & is impossible to say what's wrong or therefore what you should do about it from just an email anyway, sorry.

Quote:
She did founder 6 months ago according to my farrier ( I did not own her) and he said she is growing out very well and has very hard feet. He sid she will not be fully backto normal for another 3 or 4 tirms so could that effect her down hill motion. Though she foundered in front and this was the back.
Probably not that, *assuming she's trimmed well* & has good, short heels & toes. She is all connected(I hope!), so a front-end prob can appear as a back-end symptom though. It may have been purely mechanical 'founder' or such, but it's commonly due to a metabolic problem, which is why many horses are 'prone' to laminitis. I'd look at ecirhorse.com & safergrass.org for more info on managing her proactively to avoid repeats, but it's possible a 'low grade' laminitic 'attack' made her a bit sensitive going down hill.

Quote:
and BTW I am so glad to find this site I haveno horse friends in the real world to ask crazy horse questions to
Oh, the real world is sooo overrated!
     
    09-17-2012, 12:11 AM
  #4
Foal
Thanks for the info. Oh her founder was due to her being overweight the people that had her before me threw her to pasture with all she could eat plus hay and she is still a little overweight but we are working on that and she is looking better and better
DRichmond likes this.
     

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