Coronet cut turned proud! - Page 3
 
 

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Coronet cut turned proud!

This is a discussion on Coronet cut turned proud! within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Coronet cuts horse
  • Gravel Hoof abcess erupted now with proud flesh at coronet band

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    02-11-2012, 11:29 PM
  #21
Weanling
Ha I found it. Its called Schreiner's Herbal Solution it works wonders.

here is there site for you to do some reading up on.

Schreiner Herbal Solution
I can buy it from my local feed store but if you can't find it there you can purchase it from the site. Good luck
     
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    02-11-2012, 11:31 PM
  #22
Weanling
If you look at the testimonials and read the one "HE KICKED IN THE STALL DOOR" dated 11/30/2009 that is my baby
     
    02-11-2012, 11:47 PM
  #23
Yearling
As far as proud flesh is concerned, granulation is good and a sign of the healing process. Excess granulation is proud flesh and too much is not good, unless you don't care about lumpy hairless scars. Proud flesh can come and go quickly but pressure bandages slow it down and you know it's a problem when the center of the proud flesh is above the level of the skin and wrapping doesn't help. I agree Vetericyn is great stuff although I've never had a blown abscess to use it on.

For your horse's coronet band, and the crack that's there now, I agree that it's likely that there will always be a crack growing down from that old injury. However, since it's still healing, you might want to get a really good farrier out to look at it and see if there is some corrective shoeing or protective trim/shoeing that can be done to unweight or redistribute the pressure on that hoof wall. If you could get that now, while it's still healing and growing out, you might be able to have fewer problems in the future.

For example, our gelding has a hoof crack from an old coronet injury that he got before we bought him. From time to time he'll split from the ground up and needs trimming to keep the crack from widening and deepening. This fall he needed corrective shoeing because he broke a chunk off. But, we've had him for 5-6 years and this is only the second time it's been anything we had to really worry about. Having said that, we're scrupulous about regular trims every 6 weeks and we have a great farrier, and the horse gets shoes when we're trail riding on rocky trails in the summer, so that we don't damage the hoof.
     
    02-12-2012, 04:16 AM
  #24
Trained
Hi,
That doesn't even look like flesh to me, let alone proud, looks like the crack's now in the hoofwall?? Pardon if that was explained earlier & I haven't read all replies. As when we bash or cut our own finger at the cuticle, that being where the nail grows from, it can often damage the nail there & it will grow out with a crack. It appears to me that's what's happened. I'd just watch that it doesn't get infected & possibly open it up a little for treatment if it is or there is big risk, given environment, and when it grows down near the bottom, keep an eye on it & keep the foot trimmed in such a way as to minimise the risk of it breaking away too soon. As someone else said, damage to the coronet like that may result in a vertical crack & depending on the damage, it can often have a permenant 'fault line' - a superficial crack, more of a dent, even after it's all healed.

But what concerns me is the shape of the wall on that side, as I've highlighted in your pic. Did the horse have nice straight walls(the rest looks ok from what can be seen) before the event, or is this another prob? Could be because that area has been weakened & there has been permanant pressure on the wall in that area, due to being shod. I'd consider if that may be the case - or if that funky shape is not directly related to the injury - that it may be best to keep the horse unshod & well trimmed, at least until it can heal.
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Ladytrails likes this.
     
    02-12-2012, 09:49 AM
  #25
Foal
I'm glad to see the area closed in for you. I will try to use a natural product for over-granulated areas (proudflesh) before going with the more toxic substances.

My first question if I were called in to look at this would be what caused the abscess to begin with. Not being able to see the entire hoof I will give this a shot and say there are a couple of things to notice. The forward running tubules seen starting at the hairline & running toward the front of the hoof. The appearance of a weak heel possibly. And then the decreased hoof function causing restriction for flexibility because of the shoe.

If it were me I'd pull the shoes and begin trimming to strengthen & change the angle of the hoof. I do believe the crack in the coronet will disappear and the wall will grow back in nice & straight with a rehabilitative trim.

I will say it wouldn't surprise me if the abscess becomes a bit of a problem as you go through the steps to heal the hoof. Until that is cleared there is the likelihood this will show itself again. Being that there is a shoe it will probably come out at the hairline. Once the shoe is removed you will probably find an abscess track leading to the bottom of the hoof.

There are ways to treat this naturally through the trim & disease control. I'd put the horse on Hoof Ailments from For Love of the Horse to purge out the disease inside the hoof. And then consider if there are lifestyle changes to enhance the results and provide for long term health.

Not sure what your interest is at this point so will leave that up to you. Hope it all works out for you & your horse.

Take care,
Linda
     
    02-13-2012, 03:35 AM
  #26
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Hi,
That doesn't even look like flesh to me, let alone proud, looks like the crack's now in the hoofwall?? Pardon if that was explained earlier & I haven't read all replies. As when we bash or cut our own finger at the cuticle, that being where the nail grows from, it can often damage the nail there & it will grow out with a crack. It appears to me that's what's happened. I'd just watch that it doesn't get infected & possibly open it up a little for treatment if it is or there is big risk, given environment, and when it grows down near the bottom, keep an eye on it & keep the foot trimmed in such a way as to minimise the risk of it breaking away too soon. As someone else said, damage to the coronet like that may result in a vertical crack & depending on the damage, it can often have a permenant 'fault line' - a superficial crack, more of a dent, even after it's all healed.

But what concerns me is the shape of the wall on that side, as I've highlighted in your pic. Did the horse have nice straight walls(the rest looks ok from what can be seen) before the event, or is this another prob? Could be because that area has been weakened & there has been permanant pressure on the wall in that area, due to being shod. I'd consider if that may be the case - or if that funky shape is not directly related to the injury - that it may be best to keep the horse unshod & well trimmed, at least until it can heal.
As previously stated that leg is turned in...His hoof wall was flattened by the pressure of where his leg broke over because of poor trimming and that has already been addressed hence the shoes. The granulation is above the hoof but building over it as shown in previous pictures.

I don't mind scaring as he is far from a halter horse and will probably only be used for trails and work.

I was out there today and the buildup has gone down and once the ground drys out a little I think I might try to reopen it and flush it one more time, just from the top not the whole thing. I just don't want to do it while the ground is saturated and it could get even more infected then the first time.

HoofMechanic - the abscess was there before shoeing as was the weakness from it being flat trimmed and never properly taken care of. I had it trimmed for the correction several times before even considering shoeing him. I did however shoe him because I am working on training him more and taking him off the ranch for rides out on gravel roads. It is on the hairline and it hasn't bothered him, no limping, lifting, or rubbing, etc. He was kept on a property with no drainage where one horse had cankers two thrush and one hoof rot before I got him so yes I'm going to have my challenges with his health.
     
    02-13-2012, 07:11 AM
  #27
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nuala    
As previously stated that leg is turned in...His hoof wall was flattened by the pressure of where his leg broke over because of poor trimming and that has already been addressed hence the shoes. The granulation is above the hoof but building over it as shown in previous pictures.
Pardon again, but I just read the thread & still missed where you previously stated that. I don't get what you mean his hoof wall was flattened or what shoes have to do with that?

After having a better look at the pics, I'm also concerned with the bullnose look of the toe & the angle of the tubules, on what can be seen of that hoof. As mentioned, I'm concerned also with the excess pressure on that area of the hoof, which could possibly have caused the abscess in the first place, but that I think may have caused the further weakened area to 'buckle' like that. If you feel the need to shoe for whatever reason, I'd consider releiving that quarter.

Agree with hoofmechanic that I wouldn't be concerned with the 'proud' area so much as the whole foot & the mechanics that are causing these probs.
Ladytrails likes this.
     
    03-04-2012, 01:55 AM
  #28
Foal
Actually lyme works great. Any lower leg injury I have ever had I packed with lyme just make sure you put vaseline on skin under the wound. I have never had proud flesh using this. It is one of the old school methods that actually works well. The lyme isnt painful and as long as you put the vaseline on the skin below the wound to protect it all is great.
     

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