Could this be Navicular Syndrome???
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Could this be Navicular Syndrome???

This is a discussion on Could this be Navicular Syndrome??? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Will a horse with navicular stand parked out
  • Why do horses stand parked out

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-20-2008, 11:19 PM
  #1
Foal
Could this be Navicular Syndrome???

Hi everyone -

I have a 3 yr old paint who for the past 6 months or so has been showing possible signs of NS. When he comes out of his stall after being in for the night his first couple of steps are lame ( in both of his fronts) He will work out of it when worked or when he plays out in the pasture. He was shod inproperly once which cause an in balance, but now his feet are in great shape, he is underhimself well ( its been 4 or so shoeings) he does have small feet; 00.
He has had a major growth spurt in this time frame as well.
He lameness has also been inconsistant ( we are now working on monitering him with consistant exercise and how that effects him) My vet wanted to hold off on an MRI or ultrasound for a bit to see if we would find some consistancy, but no such luck. I have him on joint supplements and use medicine boots while riding. He is not overweight and is in pretty good shape for not being ridden regularly during the winter.
Any suggestions would be great. Thanks!!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-21-2008, 01:29 AM
  #2
Showing
At 3, that should be too young for a horse to have NS... having said that, if you can detect it early and manage it properly, that's key. I would ask your vet to do some nerve blocks and x-rays to see if he can pick anything out.
     
    04-21-2008, 09:05 AM
  #3
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustDressageIt
At 3, that should be too young for a horse to have NS... having said that, if you can detect it early and manage it properly, that's key. I would ask your vet to do some nerve blocks and x-rays to see if he can pick anything out.
I have to disagree there. There's a horse at the barn wth NS and he's four and he's had it since the BO bought him...and she bought him at age two. It is possible to get NS at a young age...but it's rare.

If you are worried about NS talk to your farrier and your vet. You can do simple x-rays to find out whether or not he has NS.

Is it only after being in a stall at night that he's lame for a while? It could be he has a case of arthritis. Being outside all the time is better for a horse, especially one with NS or arthritis.

Easiest thing is to talk to your farrier and see if he is concerned. Tell him exactly what is going on, and that you are worried about NS. I always ask my farrier questions if I'm worried on something, and he said he'd rather have me ask a stupid question than ignore signs that might be harmful to a horse.
     
    04-21-2008, 11:47 AM
  #4
Foal
Thanks for the advice everyone. I am thinking it is arthritis, since he works out of it and we see a slight difference when he is stalled all day during bad weather when we don't turn out. My vet has recommended to do the nerve block then MRI. I am hopeful - but, since he is so young, I just worry for the long term since he is still growing and fast!
     
    04-21-2008, 11:57 AM
  #5
Showing
Sorry Sonny, you're completely right - NS at a young age isn't impossible, but it is very rare.. I am sorry if I made it sound like NS wasn't possible at such a young age.
     
    04-21-2008, 02:40 PM
  #6
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by mucka
Thanks for the advice everyone. I am thinking it is arthritis, since he works out of it and we see a slight difference when he is stalled all day during bad weather when we don't turn out. My vet has recommended to do the nerve block then MRI. I am hopeful - but, since he is so young, I just worry for the long term since he is still growing and fast!
I'd start putting your horse on some joint medicine to help protect the joints...and even if it isn't arthritis it will still help. If it is arthritis, the worst thing you can do for the joint it to keep the horse in a stall. In a stall a horse can't walk around and get enough excercize, making the leg stiff....which can worsen arthritis.
My horse, Sonny, is outside 24/7...the only time he's in a stall is when I'm tacking him up
Try letting him out all the time...that should help if it's arthritis.

If it gets worse, or is bothering him more, I'd defiantely have x-rays taken to see if it is arthritis, NS, or something more serious.
     
    04-23-2008, 04:48 AM
  #7
Trained
It doesn't sound very characteristic of Navicular at all.
Navicular has been found in horses as young as a yearlings, but generally shows up within the ages of 10-13.

Horses with navicular tend to stand parked out, keeping as much weight off their toes as possible, or will stand like that and paw with one front foot. They are very relucant to move because of the pain, therefore will not walk out of it.

It is generally found in horses with smaller feet and big muslces, or a too high carbohydrate diet and kept in a stall too much.

Quarter Horses are mostly prone to Navicular because they tend to have a smaller feet with a much higher top body weight.

There is no direct cure for Navicular, and turn out time will not help the horse, as it does not prevent the bone from rotating any less and horses are often relucant to move.

Bute is the most common drug for relieving pain, although there are many drugs that open the vessels to the foot to increase blood flow and circulation.

Without knowing how much turn out time and/or excerise your horse gets, he could just be stocked up, and as he is able to stretch himself out he becomes "un-lame".

It could be arthritis, a bruised sole, or simply a pulled muscle or tendon from playing too many horsey games.

I would suggest nerve blocks and hoof testing through an experianced veternarian to start, as they can then begin to pin-point the location of the pain, and then move onto x-rays if his lamesness does not get any better.

I would not forget though, to ask your vet to consider other joints in his legs (knees, shoulder's) when doing a physical to ensure the pain is not coming from any other joint.
     
    04-23-2008, 10:44 AM
  #8
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by WSArabians
It doesn't sound very characteristic of Navicular at all.
Navicular has been found in horses as young as a yearlings, but generally shows up within the ages of 10-13.

Horses with navicular tend to stand parked out, keeping as much weight off their toes as possible, or will stand like that and paw with one front foot. They are very relucant to move because of the pain, therefore will not walk out of it.

It is generally found in horses with smaller feet and big muslces, or a too high carbohydrate diet and kept in a stall too much.

Quarter Horses are mostly prone to Navicular because they tend to have a smaller feet with a much higher top body weight.

There is no direct cure for Navicular, and turn out time will not help the horse, as it does not prevent the bone from rotating any less and horses are often relucant to move.

Bute is the most common drug for relieving pain, although there are many drugs that open the vessels to the foot to increase blood flow and circulation.

Without knowing how much turn out time and/or excerise your horse gets, he could just be stocked up, and as he is able to stretch himself out he becomes "un-lame".

It could be arthritis, a bruised sole, or simply a pulled muscle or tendon from playing too many horsey games.

I would suggest nerve blocks and hoof testing through an experianced veternarian to start, as they can then begin to pin-point the location of the pain, and then move onto x-rays if his lamesness does not get any better.

I would not forget though, to ask your vet to consider other joints in his legs (knees, shoulder's) when doing a physical to ensure the pain is not coming from any other joint.

Thank you for great reply! My gelding does have small feet in accordance with his body size - he is a paint, but his father was a big bodied QH. His diet is balanced and is on joint supplements.

I think it is a combination of things ( I think he pulled something playing this winter) he is growing and for the past couple of months since its been cold, he wasnst worked consistanly and was not turned out everyday.

We thought with his corrective shoeing( its been 4 or 5 of them ) things would inprove, but not too much. Now, he is not showing any signs of bruising and is well balanced.

Its looks like nerve block and MRI scans here we come!
     
    05-22-2008, 01:40 AM
  #9
Foal
Actually this sounds exactly how my horse started out and he was just diagnosed with Navicular syndrome. He's not quite 8 years old yet. He always seemed lame when we first walked him out of his stall but it seemed to improve with work. However, too much work and he would appear even more lame the following day. His lameness was also inconsistent, sometimes even looking almost completely sound and then totally lame the next day. His lameness also appeared much more severe when turning one direction over the other.

Are you bringing him in to a softer surface when exercising him? His feet feel better on the softer surface creating the appearance of him working it out as he starts to hurt less on the softer sand of a ring or on grass other than the hard floor of the aisleway

Ultrasound's are almost useless because they can not detect the soft tissue and injury to portion the DDF tendon that often accompanies damage to the navicular bone because the hoof wall blocks the view. MRI's or a bone scan are the best options in confirming this damage but are very costly.

This sounds EXACTLY like my horse's lameness. Small feet, upright pasterns, and lots of stall time or confinement are large factors that may set your horse up for navicular.

Don't rule it out because of his age! Have a vet check him out because early treatment is the best way to prevent progression of navicular syndrome.

Some feel a wedge bar shoe is best for horses with navicular while others feel barefoot is best. We are trying a rather new shoe with my horse, the same one being used on the recent Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner Big Brown. It really depends on what works best for your horse, but ample turnout and proper hoof care is a MUST!
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0