Cow Hocked Foal, supplements??? - The Horse Forum

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 03:29 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ireland
Posts: 615
• Horses: 3
Cow Hocked Foal, supplements???

I just need some more information on Bailey, the vet was out today (friends vet who was in the area and specialises in horses) to take a look at the two and start their vaccinations and do a check and I asked about baileys back legs.

He has weak cow hocked back legs, which don't seem to affect him that much, vet says he has muscle in him and there are no blood clots or any issues with the joints other than the cow hocks, she seems to think that this will get better with time and she took some bloods from both to check if there are any other issues that I didnt know about.


So my question is can a foal that is cow hocked ever straighten his legs out and is there anything that I can give him supplement wise to increase his chances of straightening and strengthening his legs.
bubblegum is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 03:53 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Watertown, MN
Posts: 5,540
• Horses: 3
No supplements that I know of. How old is he? Can you post pics so we can see the degree? What do you plan on using him for? There are plenty of horses that are cow-hocked and don't have problems, so it really depends on how bad it is and what you want to do with him. I really advocate staying away from supplements unless absolutely needed. Also, I would listen to your vet here, if she specializes in horses she's probably aware of anything that could help him.
MN Tigerstripes is offline  
post #3 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 04:03 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ireland
Posts: 615
• Horses: 3
he is currently 5 months old, I will take pics in the morning and post them, its pretty severe, when he is standing still his knee joints meet and when he is walking they sometimes brush off each other, but he can bomb around and have fun. Just thought there might be some supplement I could give him that could help that she didnt mention.
bubblegum is offline  
post #4 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 04:50 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Northern Utah
Posts: 5,455
• Horses: 1
I have seen some really hig dollar foals that had cow hocked legs. As they grow and thier muscles develop thier legs will straighten out.

There's nothing like the Rockies in the springtime... Nothing like the freedom in the air... And there ain't nothing better than draggin calves to the fire and there's nothing like the smell of burning hair. -Brenn Hill
kevinshorses is offline  
post #5 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 05:25 PM
Yearling
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: secret mountain valley
Posts: 1,363
• Horses: 2
A lot of foals straighten out with time. If you had the vet out and she gave you her advice, you should stick with that. There are a lot of dangers in over supplimenting and no one on an internet forum is going to be able to give you better medical advice than the vet that examined your foal in person. If you don't intend to use him as a high performance horse, he probably will be fine. Only time will tell, in the meantime letting him run and play and be a foal will be the best thing for him.

PS. His knee joints (stifles) are actually up much higher (near the hip area). Just lettin ya know so that can use the right terms when describing his legs to someone over the phone or internet. =) The hocks are another joint entirely.
tealamutt is offline  
post #6 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 05:31 PM Thread Starter
Weanling
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ireland
Posts: 615
• Horses: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by tealamutt View Post
A lot of foals straighten out with time. If you had the vet out and she gave you her advice, you should stick with that. There are a lot of dangers in over supplimenting and no one on an internet forum is going to be able to give you better medical advice than the vet that examined your foal in person. If you don't intend to use him as a high performance horse, he probably will be fine. Only time will tell, in the meantime letting him run and play and be a foal will be the best thing for him.

PS. His knee joints (stifles) are actually up much higher (near the hip area). Just lettin ya know so that can use the right terms when describing his legs to someone over the phone or internet. =) The hocks are another joint entirely.

Ooops sorry about that, will get my chart out again get confused some times and mix them up
bubblegum is offline  
post #7 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 07:45 PM
Trained
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: wisconsin
Posts: 5,695
• Horses: 3
it obviously depends on the degree, but I prefer horses who are cow hocked ! Also, as stated above, they can grow out of issues like that as they grow their angles with change some

Gypsy & Scout <3
Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid. ~Albert Einstein
gypsygirl is offline  
post #8 of 8 Old 11-13-2009, 09:45 PM
Started
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: USDF Region 1, USEA Area 2, USEF Zone 3 - Maryland
Posts: 1,903
• Horses: 3
gypsygirl - I also like slighty cow hocked horses, slightly being the key word.

I agree with the others - no supplements can fix it because it's genetic and they might straighten out over time. Let him grow and see what he ends up with.

-Melanie
Mom to 3 bays: Beau, Daisy & Cavalina
My Beau is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.



User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
cow and sickle hocked??? chika1235 Horse Riding Critique 1 11-10-2009 07:13 PM
Sickle-Hocked? Please help me. Solo Horse Health 3 07-22-2008 05:10 PM
Foal, foal, cute little foal!!!!!!!! PIC OVERLOAD! DutchHorse Horse Pictures 9 07-21-2008 10:19 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome