Coyotes and horses? - Page 3
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Coyotes and horses?

This is a discussion on Coyotes and horses? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        02-15-2011, 04:17 PM
      #21
    Trained
    We have 3 packs in the area. Once in a great while they will all come together, and their meet-up point seems to be my neighbor's yard. The horse fence we have around wouldn't stop them, but it probably deters them from entering our yard. There is a wash that goes within 20 feet of our corrals. The mare mostly ignores them. The gelding lived in the open on ranches, and he gets very upset. However, I can't imagine them tackling two healthy horses, or surviving if they did.

    My dogs hate coyotes, but they don't try to engage them either. The older dog we gave to my daughter had spent some time around them because he used to get out and stay in the desert for 24-36 hours. He hates coyotes as well, but avoids them if possible. When the other two were pups, Dan would stand guard over them while they retreated to the back porch. I think Dan somehow got the idea across that coyotes were dangerous and not to be tackled unless cornered. At 50 lbs, the Border Collie is about the size of the coyotes around here, while the Australian Shepherd is larger - but 2 against 6 or 10 wouldn't work out so well either.

    Mostly, I'll just see 2-3 moving along the wash. As long as they are just passing thru, neither horse gets too upset. The dogs will bark, but won't give chase.
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        02-16-2011, 01:39 PM
      #22
    Yearling
    We have coyotes everywhere and haven't had any issues with them attacking cattle, horses, chickens, ducks, people or any other creatures on our farm. I live fairly close to the forest, with ridges and such that coyotes live in.

    Canines are smart animals, I'm sure they could have driven the cow into the barbed wire fencing. Or perhaps the cow just didn't see it and tried to get away. If food is very scarce, they could try and get harder prey like a horse. Most canines hunt in packs, from what I know. If natural food isn't there, they might try to get something from a farmer or a rancher. They'd probably go towards poultry first, then maybe cows, and if they had to horses. I think horses would be last resort, if there is one [or a very small group] out alone in a smaller pasture away from high-traffic areas.

    Just my thoughts with my experiences. Our land isn't hunted much, so they have there own prey. Our horses have a pasture closer to the roads, and the barns are pretty much front-and-center with traffic going by them constantly. We have multiple farm dogs that are outside, and we have quite a few smaller dogs [not toy breeds, but smaller herders] that are fenced in. I don't think I coyote would even want to mess with us, or have any reason to. But different places have different deals. That's why I don't like the idea of a huge pasture out of sight. Not that we have the land, but coyotes and other factors can take a toll on the animals if they're too far out.
         
        02-16-2011, 02:53 PM
      #23
    Foal
    Our neighbors also have chickens, guineas and peacocks. The guineas and peacocks are up here all the time looking for dropped grain so I know exactly how big the flocks are - 12 guineas and 3 peacocks. A year ago a guinea and two peacocks disappeared. Maybe a coyote got them but a year later their numbers haven't changed so either the coyotes aren't that desperate or the birds got smarter. Occasionally I hear a few gunshots late at night and have always thought some neighbor within a couple miles is chasing a coyote away from chickens or trash.
         
        02-16-2011, 02:56 PM
      #24
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by twogeldings    
    When you call in coyotes for hunting, you usually get a pair. Sometimes just one, but generally a pair.

    The best thing you can do with coyotes is either live trap them or shoot them. They're as common as head lice. Generally they don't go after calves and such unless they are really hungry. Coyotes honestly prefer scavenged meals, or already wounded animals.

    WOLVES on the other hand, WILL take down dogs, calves, foals, etc. REGARDLESS of how hungry they are. They take down larger animals just for the fun of it, who ever came up with the idea to reintroduce them was out of their minds. I would check and see if your area has a wolf population or not. Wolves are far more aggressive then 'yotes.

    I, personally, own a pack of wolves and am part of a large community of "domesticated" wolf owners. I have studied wolves for years and what you are saying is not true! They DO NOT hunt for just for fun. You should check your facts first before spreading misinformation.
         
        02-16-2011, 03:12 PM
      #25
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    I believe that coyotes only go for larger animals (anything bigger than a weanling calf) out of desperation. I don't believe that coyotes would try or even be able to drive a full grown cow into a fence to the point where she got tangled and died. We've got millions of coyotes around my area and other than the occasional foal/calf or smaller pet like a cat or a dog, nobody has ever lost any stock to them.
    You are 100% correct!
         

    Quick Reply
    Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
    Message:
    Options

    Register Now

    In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

    Already have a Horse Forum account?
    Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

    New to the Horse Forum?
    Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

    User Name:
    Password
    Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
    Password:
    Confirm Password:
    Email Address
    Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
    Email Address:

    Log-in

    Human Verification

    In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


    Old Thread Warning
    This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    ‎**FREE HORSES*** 52 thoroughbred horses need homes. Richard Conrad Horses for Sale 2 02-02-2011 07:55 PM
    Coyotes & Horses MyBoyPuck Horse Riding 10 11-03-2010 08:32 PM
    You can now access members' horses via the Horses tab above their avatars Mike_Admin Horse Forum Rules and Announcements 20 09-04-2010 08:13 PM
    Coyotes Tasia Horse Protection 29 02-01-2010 03:49 PM
    All my horses! Extremely Picture Heavy!! 7 Different horses! Skippy! Horse Pictures 22 10-04-2009 09:48 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:12 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0