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Cribbing

This is a discussion on Cribbing within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Homemade cribbing cure

 
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    11-10-2008, 03:00 PM
  #11
Foal
There is definitely a difference between cribbing and chewing due to stress or anxiousness. I have a horse that doesn't touch the fence unless she is waiting for her grain, then she chews the fence and metal saddle racks (on the outside of the fence) until her bowl is in front of her. Apparently, she doesn't know how to direct her anticipation of something good to eat any other way.
     
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    11-10-2008, 05:12 PM
  #12
Foal
Ok then he is chewing. He has ripped one board apart already on the top rail of the fence. He is also a weaver, but I already knew this. He weaves when inside and when he is excited to see me or when I bring him food. Other than that he doesn't weave. The boards were just recently added to the fence as well. He never bothered the wooden posts that come out of the ground and they are garden ties (8" x 4") and 6' high. So he is probably board or anxious doing this. He has a pony who shares a paddock with him and they get along other than when you bring food out, he will chase her away and try and hord all the food. So I feed him on one side of the pasture and her on the other. They don't come inside hardly ever unless it is wet and cold. So far that is...
     
    11-10-2008, 07:48 PM
  #13
Foal
You might try to give him more hay, so he has something beneficial to keep him busy chewing, or one of those lick toys that they sell, or one of those balls. Frequent excersize might also help.
     
    11-10-2008, 08:46 PM
  #14
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by kickshaw    
wood chewing is different from cribbing

Wood chewing is usually caused by a mineral dificiency - you can put him on a supplement called Quitt (guaranteed to work) or you can paint your fences with used motor oil + cayenne pepper (I think Farnam also makes a product called NO CHEW)

Good luck
Sorry, kickshaw, I don't agree. Wood chewing is NOT usually caused by a mineral deficiency. It can be, but it's a habit, like us chewing our nails. Habit, boredom, attention-getter, copy-cat, fear, insecurity...

And DEFINITELY DON'T USE MOTOR OIL on the wood! This is a poison and can cause cancer and who knows what else. A bar of soap, as mentioned, spices, like cayenne mixed with the soap, sunlight dish soap, etc. are all possible things to make the wood less appealing.

I have had three chewers -- I cured all of them, even one that decided to try it after a new horse came in that chewed. I put sunlight dish soap (diluted with water to spread well) with a LOT of cayenne mixed in on every stitch of wood I could find in the barn. I made sure there was good-for-them poplar trees / logs to chew on in the paddock and after they settled in to their new home, they all quit chewing on the barn.
     
    11-10-2008, 10:09 PM
  #15
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by northernmama    
Sorry, kickshaw, I don't agree. Wood chewing is NOT usually caused by a mineral deficiency. It can be, but it's a habit, like us chewing our nails. Habit, boredom, attention-getter, copy-cat, fear, insecurity...

And DEFINITELY DON'T USE MOTOR OIL on the wood! This is a poison and can cause cancer and who knows what else. A bar of soap, as mentioned, spices, like cayenne mixed with the soap, sunlight dish soap, etc. are all possible things to make the wood less appealing.

I have had three chewers -- I cured all of them, even one that decided to try it after a new horse came in that chewed. I put sunlight dish soap (diluted with water to spread well) with a LOT of cayenne mixed in on every stitch of wood I could find in the barn. I made sure there was good-for-them poplar trees / logs to chew on in the paddock and after they settled in to their new home, they all quit chewing on the barn.
different strokes, then!

We have never had a problem with used motor oil...

And we have cured many chewers with Farnam's Quitt product.
     
    11-11-2008, 08:44 PM
  #16
Trained
I have never tried a commercial product for this, but I don't see why it wouldn't work -- probably based on the same idea of yucky taste. So far, (fingers crossed) my homemade stuff has worked OK. I'd still feel really awful about using the oil though. I suppose one taste would be enough for 99% of horses. Maybe just the smell is enough actually and they never taste it at all.
     
    11-11-2008, 09:09 PM
  #17
Foal
I have done research on this too. My horse is a cribber. I read vaseline and caynenne pepper. Next week I am going to try a strand of wire with pipe over it. The article stays this will deter as well.
     
    11-11-2008, 09:25 PM
  #18
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustUs    
The horse that I posted about in my other post has decided to start to eat wood now. He just chips it away on the boards on the fence, he is already through 1 1x6, so we'll see how many more he rips apart. Is there something I could put on the wood to detier his cribbing? He has a pony in with him and lots of food, I don't want to work him as he is underweight already. Any suggestions would be appreciated...
We have wood fencing on most of the property at the barn. The top and front of the fencing has electrical tape...the fencing is intact
     

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