Cribbing!!???
 
 

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Cribbing!!???

This is a discussion on Cribbing!!??? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Health problems horse that cribs
  • Can my horse pick up bad habit of cribbing

 
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    11-01-2009, 10:06 PM
  #1
Yearling
Cribbing!!???

How many of you have or know horses that crib?
Are you annoyed by it?
Any health issues?
Does it affect your day to day life, and/or your horses?

Thanks
     
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    11-01-2009, 10:24 PM
  #2
Banned
I have a cribber. I know that there are three or four other cribbers at my barn, and I've known two other horses at previous barns that I've ridden at that crib.

I personally am annoyed by my horse cribbing, because I know its bad for him! Lol He is a little skinny, but I think that's lack of food/muscle. His teeth are getting crooked but he doesn't drop food, so I'm not super-duper worried.

I don't think it our affects our riding or our life together, he doesn't try to stop on a fence line to crib or anything like that. Mostly its just stressful because I think its an ugly habit and I want him to stop!
     
    11-01-2009, 10:26 PM
  #3
Yearling
Quote:
I have a cribber. I know that there are three or four other cribbers at my barn, and I've known two other horses at previous barns that I've ridden at that crib.

I personally am annoyed by my horse cribbing, because I know its bad for him! Lol He is a little skinny, but I think that's lack of food/muscle. His teeth are getting crooked but he doesn't drop food, so I'm not super-duper worried.

I don't think it our affects our riding or our life together, he doesn't try to stop on a fence line to crib or anything like that. Mostly its just stressful because I think its an ugly habit and I want him to stop!
Oh okay, that's good it isnt affecting his health :) The reason I was wondering, is because I am interested in buying a horse that cribs.. Like almost half the horses in the world do it :P
I just wanted to see how many people have horses that crib.
Is there any way to stop them? Besides the collar?
Like, if they arent bored, will they stop? XD
     
    11-01-2009, 10:38 PM
  #4
Banned
It depends on the horse, really. I know collars aren't effective with my boy, he's pretty dedicated, lol. At his previous home, they had hotwire on the tops of their fences and around the trees, so that kept him out of the habit for awhile.

I have heard that if you keep a horse nice and tired, they don't crib. Usually when I put my horse back after a good workout, he cribs as soon as he gets in the stall, so whether my boy isn't tired enough, or that statement is false, I couldn't tell you. You can try a variety of things, hanging a hay bag so their hay lasts longer and they're distracted, their are plenty of coatings that taste nasty that you can paint on your stall doors and your fence boards. You can also use something like tobasco sauce or unscented bar soap.

I have a thread going about suggestions on what to do since I think Ice has ulcers....one of the signs of those is cribbing. Make sure he doesn't have any gastric problems or things like that also.
     
    11-01-2009, 10:38 PM
  #5
Started
I used to have a cribber...but he doesn't crib anymore :) I got him knowing he was a cribber but I refused to put the collar on him. I hate collars, they only mask the actual problem and they are just horrible things.

Cribbing is not a vice, it's a health issue. It's caused by digestive upset, usually by ulcers. What really helps is making sure the horse has constant access to forage...if he can't be out on pasture all the time, he needs hay at all times. If not, excess acid will build up in his stomach, irritating the stomach lining. Cribbing is the horse attempting to 'burp.' Humans can burp to release pressure, but horses can't, so that's why they crib.

The myth with cribbing is that other horses can pick up the 'habit' just from being around it, but that is not true. Cribbing is a health issue, not a vice like I stated.

What I did with my horse is 1) turned him out on pasture 24/7 with access to free choice hay, 2) treated him with a cribbing supplement from FeedMark to see if that alone would cure it, 3) since the supplement didn't rid the cribbing altogether, I treated him for 72 days with U-Guard 2X ulcer powder (I couldn't afford GastroGuard). Now he doesn't crib :) I've also made sure he gets plenty of exercise, low stress and just make sure everything in his life is balanced.
     
    11-01-2009, 10:47 PM
  #6
Started
I grew up around a barn with two bad/chronic cribbers. They were downright mean, so I suspect they did have some health issues that lead to crabby behavior. If your treating the problem I see no reason not to put a collar on them... especially if your horse is destroying someone elses property (ie you are boarding.) If I boarded horses, I would require all cribbers wear a strap if it helped, because I don't want to be replacing fences and stall doors all the time. Do you have proof that every single horse that cribs has health issues? I believe a majority of them do but IDK about all of them. I've seen horses with constant forage access that still crib.
     
    11-01-2009, 10:50 PM
  #7
Green Broke
We have a horse that is a cribber. Its a very bad issue that can result in health issues such as weight-loss, crooked teeth, ulsers, and crankiness. All they want to do is crib. Its a drug to them It starts out as being bored, then it turns into a habit, then an addiction. I'd get a cribbing collar ASAP.
     
    11-01-2009, 10:54 PM
  #8
Yearling
My new rescue is a cribber and I found these links, that help alot.

http://www.ultimatehorsesite.com/info/cribbing.html
Natural Supports for Ulcers, Cribbing & Wind-Sucking


(cribbing prevention things)
Health & First Aid - Cribbing Prevention

Hope this helps xoxo.

I do agree with SpiritHorse on this, except for the collar, in a sense.
If you need to get a collar than get it and see if it helps, but you should have him on supplements and lots of forage for him,

I completely disagree with cribbing makes a horse crabby,
     
    11-01-2009, 10:57 PM
  #9
Started
Cribbing can also lead to colic, and horses who crib more are prone to have a lot of colic episodes, possibly needing colic surgery if it's bad enough.
     
    11-02-2009, 01:33 AM
  #10
Trained
Cribbing comes about due to stress of unnatural, unhealthy management practices, such as keeping a horse stabled a lot, solitary confinement, boredom, etc. Particularly due to unhealthy feeding, such as infrequent(less than 3-4 times daily) rich & or large meals, and lack of forage/fibre, as in free choice hay/grazing. It is an obsessive compulsive coping behaviour, which is thought to be self-reinforcing because it produces endorphines that may reduce the horse's stress/pain.

In a study done a number of years ago on Australian racehorses, a huge percentage were found to have stomach ulcers, and the vast majority were cribbers, so I think the jury's still out on mental stress being a possible cause, but the physical causes have definitely been proven.

It is an annoying 'habit' that can be virtually unbreakable in many horses, even once the diet & management have been rectified. Horses can damage timber fences, doors and their teeth in the process. I'm pretty sure that it's now been proven that horses don't learn the 'habit' from eachother. Therefore, if a number of horses at the same barn develop the habit for eg. Then it's pretty obvious the management practices aren't healthy for the horses there.

While it has been linked to weightloss & colic, it seems that it is a *symptom* of the problems that cause the prob, not the cause of it. Eg. Stomach ulcers & unhealthy feeding practices lead to weight loss, colic and cribbing or windsucking.

I wouldn't be worried about acquiring a cribber, so long as I had a decent *healthy* environment to keep him - eg. 24/7 turnout with other horse(s) and free choice hay/grazing(well, I wouldn't take on any horse without those requirements). I would treat him for ulcers, if I thought it was probable, preferrably avoid, replace or minimise the amount of timber fence posts or rails, & paint them with 'cribbox' or such as a deterrant. Then I would pretty much forget about the problem.
     

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