Cribbing Supplements - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 21 Old 11-09-2009, 05:53 PM Thread Starter
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I only give him small amounts of grain in his diet.
He is Turned out 24/7
I am not looking for advice on cribbing, as I have already done lots of research about it, im just looking for supplements to add to his diet, as an extra boost with helping prevent it.
Not to sound rude, thank you for all who have put the time to reply in this, about cribbing, but I AM NOT looking for advice about it, im sure you havent looked at my threads regarding my horse.

He is not stalled, turned out 24/7, has small amounts of grain etc, will be getting a cribbing collar, has a large salt block, As mentioned, I am just looking for something to add to give me a hand with this.

I am not administering the medicine until he gets scoped out by my vet.


Thank you for the above replys (Sorry if I seem a bit snippy, im not in the best mood today)
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post #12 of 21 Old 11-09-2009, 11:46 PM
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Besides ulcers, cribbing is often just a common vice. First of all, as others have said, make sure he is getting proper nutrients. There is a cribber in my barn, and no matter how well she is fed, she still cribs. Her owner has figured out the best solution is to preoccupy her with a hay net, like this: http://www.yuandong-rope.com/products/hay%20net.jpg It takes them a good hour or two to get through a full hay net, which is an hour or two where the horse won't be cribbing. It is also a good choice because it is closer to the basic grazing model, small amounts of food constantly.

"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are certain and the intelligent are full of doubt"
-Bertrand Russel
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post #13 of 21 Old 11-10-2009, 08:35 AM
Green Broke
 
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Cribbing can be just a habit. No amount of supplements and medication may help. Collars work great in a lot of cases. Free to eat muzzle can also work well, if the horse has to grab something with their mouth to crib.

Good luck!
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post #14 of 21 Old 11-10-2009, 08:36 AM
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A cribber is going to crib - miracle collar may be your best chance but even after wearing this for a while he will learn to crib. I have aTB that would rather crib than eat hay. He takes a bite of grain and takes a bit out of his stall until he finishes his food. He is on a senior diet and is turned out 24/7. Don't waste your money on supplements. This TB has been treated for ulcers. The only thing I did for him is put up a big round post in his pasture and let him chew on that so he stops chewing on everything else. I am sure since you have done research online you probably have come across the surgical option to fixing a cribber. NOT always succesful in an older horse but a great option for a youngster. My bad and only cribber in the barn did not crib when I got him off the racetrack, this is a habit he picked up from a barn mate that I was boarding for a friend of mine for one summer. Drives me nuts!!! Good Luck and also get the fleece covers for your miracle collar as your horse may receive sores from the pressure of the collar.
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post #15 of 21 Old 11-10-2009, 07:32 PM Thread Starter
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^ Thank you above posters.
I don't really want to be taking the surgical option, but I know with time im hoping I can live with cribbing,

I read on the internet that Cribbing actually cannot be learned from pasture mates.

My only concern about the collar is that I heard horses can suffocate when excersized if leaving the collar on ( well obviously lol, I would of course take it off! ) but what about when they frolic around the field and run around and play etc? I wouldnt want him to start running and playing and than suffocate from it.
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post #16 of 21 Old 11-10-2009, 10:05 PM
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My soon to be BIL dropped off a few of his racing thoroughbreds this past July. Most of them are cribbers <shudders> but one of them is so bad that she would rather crib than eat and was slowly losing weight because of it. We put a cribbing collar on her and it's made a HUGE difference. She's actually gaining weight and you can actually watch her eat instead of sitting there cribbing on a pole or the fence or the watering tank.

Wishing you lots of luck with your cribber and that you find something that will help.

"Riding a horse is not a gentle hobby, to be picked up and laid down like a game of solitaire. It is a grand passion. It seizes a person whole and, once it has done so, he will have to accept that his life will be radically changed." -Ralph Waldo Emerson
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post #17 of 21 Old 11-10-2009, 10:17 PM Thread Starter
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Im glad that there is progress with her :)

He is a continuos cribber, Like my dad put electric fencing around the top of the fences, so he wouldnt crib, (Since he almost pulled some of our posts out, and that would have created, lots of loose run around horses)
Anyways, I havent seen him crib recently, but last I saw him crib on the water tank.
I can't keep 24/7 watch on his soo yeah.
But he does rather eat than crib which is a good thing
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post #18 of 21 Old 11-10-2009, 11:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwisterRush View Post
^ Thank you above posters.
I don't really want to be taking the surgical option, but I know with time im hoping I can live with cribbing,

I read on the internet that Cribbing actually cannot be learned from pasture mates.

My only concern about the collar is that I heard horses can suffocate when excersized if leaving the collar on ( well obviously lol, I would of course take it off! ) but what about when they frolic around the field and run around and play etc? I wouldnt want him to start running and playing and than suffocate from it.
I have never heard of a horse suffocating with a collar. I had a cribber and he was turned out with his no problem. He was a hyperactive TB gelding, so he did lots of running around with it.

His collar was a standard cribbing collar, not a miracle collar.
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post #19 of 21 Old 11-10-2009, 11:59 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TwisterRush View Post
Im glad that there is progress with her :)

He is a continuos cribber
Meant to say
He ISNT a continuous cribber.

Anyways,

Thank you to the above poster, I've actually heard of it on some threads, but that was because the person was excersizing the horse like riding it and never took the collar off.
Im just curious if that can happen if he is in the field since he is on 24/7 turnout, because he is at my house we don't have a barn or a fancy facility you know ?
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post #20 of 21 Old 11-11-2009, 10:05 PM
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If it was a possibility, we would hear about more cases. There are plenty of cribbers with collars on who live outside in large paddocks or pastures a lot of the time.
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