Is Cribbing/Windsucking Copied Behaviour?
 
 

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Is Cribbing/Windsucking Copied Behaviour?

This is a discussion on Is Cribbing/Windsucking Copied Behaviour? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Windsuck or cribbing which is worse?
  • Windsucking or cribbing routine

 
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    02-20-2010, 09:38 AM
  #1
Weanling
Arrow Is Cribbing/Windsucking Copied Behaviour?

A new horse just moved into our barn for rehabilitation. He is underweight and I don't know much of his history. He's pretty much right across the aisle from my horse. He is the worst cribber/windsucker I have ever seen. It's incessant, he's either chewing on his bucket or gulping air - all the time. I read a couple articles that say cribbing can be mimicked or learned by watching other horses. I just don't know if I should ask if that horse be moved...I don't want to be a pain but I would hate for her to pick up a habit so hard to break.
     
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    02-20-2010, 10:52 AM
  #2
Trained
Yes, my understand is that it is a learned habit.
     
    02-20-2010, 12:38 PM
  #3
Weanling
Horses do copy that behaviour unfortunately but I think the young horses are more inclined to try it. The barn im at has some really bad cribbers as well and as long as I have been there none of the horses picked up on it. Just watch for signs of wood chewing first because it could turn into cribbing.
     
    02-20-2010, 12:44 PM
  #4
Banned
I've heard arguments both for and against and I'm not firmly in either camp. It's definitely not a direct cause and effect - if your horse is stabled near a cribber it will become a cribber. If that were true, they'd be a lot more cribbers, because most larger boarder facilities have at least one or two.

What is true, I think, is if your horse is already nervous and/or bored, and is stabled next to another nervous/bored horse, then he's likely to pick up the habit or any other stable vice.

If your horse is content and laidback and likes his routine, I doubt that it will affect him.
     
    02-20-2010, 12:59 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by maura    
I've heard arguments both for and against and I'm not firmly in either camp. It's definitely not a direct cause and effect - if your horse is stabled near a cribber it will become a cribber. If that were true, they'd be a lot more cribbers, because most larger boarder facilities have at least one or two.

What is true, I think, is if your horse is already nervous and/or bored, and is stabled next to another nervous/bored horse, then he's likely to pick up the habit or any other stable vice.

If your horse is content and laidback and likes his routine, I doubt that it will affect him.
Thank you. I was going to mention that as well. If your horses is bored or unhappy, he is more likely to pick up bad habits especially being stalled.
     
    02-21-2010, 04:20 AM
  #6
Yearling
There have been articles(that I can't seem to find..-.-) about this. Cribbing is now thought to be genetic, meaning a horse has to be genetically predisposed to cribbing to be able to pick it up. A horse that does not have a relative(parent, grandparent, etc.) that cribs, will more than likely NOT learn this behaviour. However, a horse that DOES have a relative that cribs, has a higher chance of picking it up.

Some people do not believe this to be true, but I do. I worked in a barn of 40+ horses with 3 cribbers. There were horses stalled all around them for years in the same stall. Not a single one picked it up.
     

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