Crooked joints in a 7-yr-old? Possible navicular changes??? - Page 2
   

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Crooked joints in a 7-yr-old? Possible navicular changes???

This is a discussion on Crooked joints in a 7-yr-old? Possible navicular changes??? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        07-15-2013, 05:06 PM
      #11
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tlkng1    
    ......... I can see the farrier trimming slightly higher on the inside (If that is what is to the left in that first film) to raise that area in order to straighten up the angle.........
    Hey, stupid question of the day. And maybe I'm just confused, but isn't the above quote exactly what you would NOT want to do?

    Looking at the left side of the x-ray I would be inclined to actually lower the left side, not raise is it. Lowering that side would actually take a little stress off the joints, would it not? I don't mean major trimming measures, but just lowering that side a little.

    Maybe I am just confused today. Somebody please explain, lol!

    PS. To the OP, I hope your boy is doing better with his new shoes and pads. I really hope it helps him!
         
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        07-17-2013, 02:26 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Trinity3205    
    Shes a farrier. A very experienced one much more up to date than many vets and most farriers. HGS is he horse grooming upplies forum. She posts there. Id still get an opinion from her. She may be able to point you in a better direction.
    My vet graduated from her internship in June of 2012 from Reata Equine Hospital in Texas. She's new, but she is very rapidly becoming THE lameness expert in a large part of our state. She deals only with horses, and most of her cases are lameness cases.

    And her husband, certified by the American Farriers Association, graduated in 2007 from horseshoeing school in Oklahoma. He looked at Red the day I had him down there, but didn't have time to shoe him.

    I'd say they are pretty up-to-date. Not saying a second opinion never hurts, but again, I trust them fully and I'm going to go with it for the time being.

    Although my farrier isn't "certified" he is constantly going to different continuing education things so I do know he does stay up to date as well.


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by trailhorserider    
    Hey, stupid question of the day. And maybe I'm just confused, but isn't the above quote exactly what you would NOT want to do?

    Looking at the left side of the x-ray I would be inclined to actually lower the left side, not raise is it. Lowering that side would actually take a little stress off the joints, would it not? I don't mean major trimming measures, but just lowering that side a little.

    Maybe I am just confused today. Somebody please explain, lol!

    PS. To the OP, I hope your boy is doing better with his new shoes and pads. I really hope it helps him!
    I'm not sure I really understand it all myself, but I trust my farrier 200%.

    So the top x-ray I posted is a view of his left front foot, as if you are looking at it from front to back. So the left side of the x-ray photo is actually the right (inside) side of his left front foot. (If that sentence at all makes sense.) He is slightly pigeon-toed and therefore he wears down the outside of the hoof more than the inside. Thus making the inside "too high" because it doesn't wear as fast. Shame on me he was over-due for the trim, but this lameness issue has been going on much longer than him just being over-due.

    So, he is bearing most of his weight on the outside of his hoof, because that's where he's landing and wearing away the hoof. My farrier used the example that he's landing with 60% of his weight on the outside side of the hoof, and only 40% on the inside side of the hoof. By displacing the shoe slightly to the outside, we can artifically cause his hoof to land closer to 50%/50% with equal weight.

    He also make the tail (term??) of the shoe hang out away from his heel a bit longer. Of course, it puts him more at risk for pulling a shoe, but he said by doing that it will help him get more pressure off his heel. Same thing with the low wedge = get more pressure off his heel.

    And I might not be explaining all that quite right, but I guess that's kinda how I understood it.
         
        07-17-2013, 02:30 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    Ok well if you trust them 200%, I guess you got it covered eh? ;) GL and let us know how things go.
    natisha likes this.
         
        07-17-2013, 03:31 PM
      #14
    Foal
    Hey I don't know much about this but my 19 year old AQH has a slightly crooked left leg. I have a really great farrier though who trims his left front leg different so it lands straight. You can barely tell its crooked I only notice because I know. For the most part it doesn't bother him so if your horse's situation is anything like mine he might still be able to do barrels..
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        07-19-2013, 10:50 PM
      #15
    Green Broke
    Trinity: Well you said this other person is more UTD than most vets, I guess I wanted to explain that my vet is very UTD.

    AR: Yes, I am hoping we can figure out a solution for him too.


    Well good news! Rode him tonight for the first time in 13 days. (Shoes have been on for 8 days, and today was the last day for the bute). And he felt GREAT! I was so happy. Now I realize the bute is still in his system, but its encouraging nonetheless. I didn't feel one off step the whole ride.

    So we'll see how the week turns out and if he stays sound.
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        07-19-2013, 10:59 PM
      #16
    Showing
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by tlkng1    
    The navicular changes I can see are minor. I just went through, well, 7 months ago, the whole navicular x-ray game; I don't think navicular is the issue. Given the crookedness the corrective shoeing may help. I can see the farrier trimming slightly higher on the inside (If that is what is to the left in that first film) to raise that area in order to straighten up the angle, or maybe just add a wedge pad..I am not a pro farrier by any stretch of the imagination but I went through several variations of corrective shoeing for the navicular. Hopefully the shoeing corrects the issue.
    A friend of mine had a horse with severe navicular and this looks like a minor change on X-ray to that of a horse with navicular. I do think something could be help is as posted above with corrective shoeing, but you will need a very good farrier for that.
         
        07-20-2013, 12:17 AM
      #17
    Yearling
    When it comes to farriery work, there is up to date traditional farriery and then there is up to date with the newest lines of learning that are not following the old ways so much and have proven much of it wrong even. I have found these two be two very seperate types of thinking and treatment plans and end results in many cases. All the same I wish you well. Just be aware that wedging only can go so high and then what? Hopefully they plan to get hin out of wedges. So many navicular horses go in wedges much to the detriment of the hoof. They just keep taking them higher and higher till nothing helps ignoring some obvious problems in the trim under the wedge. The best farriers do this even under direction of good vets. Many horses end up euthed early from what started as a fixable problem. Its frusterating once you know.
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        07-21-2013, 09:17 PM
      #18
    Green Broke
    Our goal is to NOT have him permanently in shoes his whole life. I do know that my farrier has extensive experience with issues like this, where some horses you were able to pull the shoes after a few months and they were fine, and others you had to leave them on.

    No, I don't think we have any plans to ever increase the wedge. He's got too much heel for that. If anything, we want to just start off with this wedge, and see if we can get him into a regular shoe, or no shoe at all.
         
        07-23-2013, 09:33 AM
      #19
    Green Broke
    More good news! Took Red to a horse show on Saturday. Felt GREAT all day.

    Gave him the day off on Sunday.

    And rode him pretty good last night. Still felt GREAT.

    I'm keeping my fingers crossed.....
         

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