Cushings (sp?) disease
   

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Cushings (sp?) disease

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    07-03-2008, 09:03 PM
  #1
Foal
Cushings (sp?) disease

Hi guys,

Can anyone tell me about Cushings disease? I know nothing about it and haven't found much info that is of any help.

My friend (with the big appy I ride) got a phone call for a guy who she had given 2 horses to 4 years ago. The deal was that both horses would be ridden by the kids and grandkids.
The guy rang because both horses were sick and he didn't want them any more. Anyway, she goes to pick them up and unfortunately nothing could be done for the big horse (i don't know the details and it upsets her to talk about it, sorry guys), but the pony is still on her feet (sort of).
Anyway, it seems that Paddy has foundered. She's about 11 hands, smokey chestnut with flaxen mane and tail. She is absolute skin and bone. (ive never seen this horse skinny, she was always overweight).
Anyway Paddy is in a really bad way. She doesn't want to walk and her hooves are like clogs (toes are that long). So she gets her home, gets the farrier out to clean up her feet and then gets the vet out. The vet said that she has definitely foundered, may have a protein deficiency and is likely to have cushings (sp?) disease and they want to take blood tests.
Does anyone know if cushings can be cured? Will the mare recover enough to have a happy life? Can she ever be ridden again? (she was supposed to be used for my kids to learn on as she is extremely quiet).
Any info would be greatly appreciated, or if you can point me in the right direction.
Thanks in advance guys
Bdna
     
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    07-03-2008, 09:06 PM
  #2
Banned
Cushings, from what I know of, can not be cured

Has the pony been checked for worms? Having worms will cause weightloss and such.
     
    07-04-2008, 06:01 AM
  #3
Foal
Finally got in touch with her owner this evening.
Vet has done blood tests and has confirmed that it is cushings. She now needs to stay on medication for the rest of her life (daily apparently) which is a little expensive. (she can't afford it at the moment so i've had it put on my bill at the vets lol) but word has it that Paddy will be a lot better soon.
She has been wormed, and apparently due to the infestation, required another dose, but i'm not sure if this has been done or not yet.
Will give you another update as soon as I get one.
Thanks guys
     
    07-04-2008, 11:46 AM
  #4
Yearling
From what I've read Cushings is basically a hormonal imbalance of some kind. It causes excessive sweating, they usually don't shed out their winter coats easily, they can get fairly chubby, and can't be worked as hard.

Between that and the founder you need to make sure she is on a low sugar low starch diet. No fresh green grass in spring and early fall...no sweet feed...no corn. I HIGHLY reccomend Triple Crown Low Starch feed. It is fantastic! There is also a new Purina WellSolve Low Starch...but I haven't tried that and I've heard it is super expensive. Stay away from Safe Choice and Acco Safe and Sound...they are gimmicks...and are only low fat...NOT low starch/sugar (no matter what the feed salesman tries to tell you). You need to make sure that the feed has a low NSC %...non-structured carbohydrate.

Cushings also increases the risk for osteoarthritis so you may want to think about a basic joint supplement.

A good friend of mine has a horse with Cushings...his treatment includes some sort of homeopathic drops that are just put on his food with an eye-dropper every morning...not sure what it is though? But it was much cheaper and safer than the Peroglide stuff that is usually prescribed.

Cushings horses also can't be stressed out to much or they will have a cortisol induced stress reaction (because their hormones are all mixed up anyway). So I would just make sure that your kids understand that...and tell them that screaming and/or the always fun racing friends on horseback is probably out of the question on this particular horse.

Other than that you just need to make sure she stays groomed because the excessive sweating will cause salt build up.

That friend of mine I mentioned...her horse was diagnosed with Cushings last year and now he is back in light riding and even doing some halter classes at small local shows with her husband this year. So don't get to depressed...there is always hope...just problems like this are labor intensive.
     
    07-05-2008, 01:08 AM
  #5
Foal
Thank you so much for your reply.
I've actually printed out your post and given it to Paddy's owner.
As for my kids, they will have to learn lots before they get to climb onto Paddy. They understand to remain calm and quiet around horses (and animals in general) and know that the best that they can hope for for a while at least is to be riding her bareback at a walk, until they get their balance.
I'm borrowing my mums appy at the moment for the kids as she is incredibly quiet and I consider safe. Put it this way, if she cracks it with you, instead of bucking or bolting or kicking or anything like that, she just stops and stands there. She will NOT move a muscle until you apologise to her for whatever you have done or asked, and then she will move off at a snails pace until she is satisfied that you are aware that she is doing this because YOU asked nicely lol I love her to bits.
Actually, the best thing about her is when you canter her bareback, if feels like your sitting in a beanbag lmao
Thanks again guys
     
    07-05-2008, 02:16 PM
  #6
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by bdna
Thank you so much for your reply.
I've actually printed out your post and given it to Paddy's owner.
As for my kids, they will have to learn lots before they get to climb onto Paddy. They understand to remain calm and quiet around horses (and animals in general) and know that the best that they can hope for for a while at least is to be riding her bareback at a walk, until they get their balance.
I'm borrowing my mums appy at the moment for the kids as she is incredibly quiet and I consider safe. Put it this way, if she cracks it with you, instead of bucking or bolting or kicking or anything like that, she just stops and stands there. She will NOT move a muscle until you apologise to her for whatever you have done or asked, and then she will move off at a snails pace until she is satisfied that you are aware that she is doing this because YOU asked nicely lol I love her to bits.
Actually, the best thing about her is when you canter her bareback, if feels like your sitting in a beanbag lmao
Thanks again guys
My horse is the same way. The first time I put my husband (who has zero horse experience) up on him...the horse just kind of looked around at me like "you've got to be kidding right?"

Sounds like your kids are going to be great on horses
     
    07-05-2008, 09:34 PM
  #7
Foal
Was going to post something here, but rather than going OT i'll post in another thread.
And yes, I think my kids will do great with the horses!
     
    07-06-2008, 10:40 PM
  #8
Yearling
Cushing's is a metabolic disease that is caused by a tumor in the pituitary gland.

You can find lots of good articles on in at www.thehorse.com. But here is one that covers lots about it and the related issue of insulin resistance.

www.thehorse.com/pdf/aaep/obese.pdf
     
    07-07-2008, 12:03 AM
  #9
Foal
Thank you for that.
I'm going there now to have a look and hopefully print some stuff out for Paddy's owners.
Thanks again guys
Bdna
     

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