Cut Grass - Page 2
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Cut Grass

This is a discussion on Cut Grass within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horses
  • How to compact cut grass

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    06-03-2009, 03:15 PM
  #11
amy
Foal
^^
Its not the machine, its mostly the plant
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    06-03-2009, 04:07 PM
  #12
Showing
Grass cut for hay is different in that it lays and "cures" or drys for days.
Its cut and swathed/raked or sort of rolled into windrows so the air can circulate and dry it. When its dried properly its baled.
Grass that is cut from a mower is left more compact so it pretty much starts to compress and ferment immediately.
Think of the difference in length of the plant cuttings. Grass cut for hay is usually long and easily "fluffed" for drying.
Grass clippings from a mower are short and dense. Its going to just lay there.
I feed some of my grass clippings to my chickens. They eat rotten tomatoes and old lettuce too. I'd never feed that sort of thing to my horses.

ETA I think if you really wanted to give your horse grass clippings, you could immediately after its cut rake and evenly spread it onto a concrete driveway so it could dry properly you could probably feed it to your horse....but who is going to do that?
     
    06-03-2009, 04:25 PM
  #13
Yearling
The first part of a horses digestive system is it's teeth , alfalfa has to be chewed by the horse and can only be consumed slowly . Grass cuttings can be swallowed at a rate faster than the horses stomach can digest it properly . If you are cutting along a fenceline the horse still has to work to get it's food , you are not leaving a pile of grass that it can stuff it's face on.
Also part of your question is answered by yourself - alfalfa is dried and turned.

I would re-iterate that feeding grass cuttings from a mower is extremly dangerous.
     
    06-03-2009, 04:31 PM
  #14
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nutty Saddler    
The first part of a horses digestive system is it's teeth , alfalfa has to be chewed by the horse and can only be consumed slowly . Grass cuttings can be swallowed at a rate faster than the horses stomach can digest it properly . If you are cutting along a fenceline the horse still has to work to get it's food , you are not leaving a pile of grass that it can stuff it's face on.
Also part of your question is answered by yourself - alfalfa is dried and turned.

I would re-iterate that feeding grass cuttings from a mower is extremly dangerous.
I never thought about them possibly gorging themselves. Never mind about the drying it on your driveway part in my last post
     
    06-03-2009, 06:22 PM
  #15
Foal
I was just talking to somebody the other day about how their neighbors were throwing over the grass clippings to this guys horse without him knowing. His horse ended up colicing and he had to pay thousands of dollars in emergency vet bills to save the horse. Definitely do not feed it to your horses.
     
    06-03-2009, 08:01 PM
  #16
Trained
Grass cut for baling is normally a preselected mixture of specific grasses and other plants. At least it is here in Aus. It doesn’t have as many weeds as normal grass areas, and as Vida mentioned, cutting is timed so that there are at least a few days of hot, dry weather to let it ‘cure’ before baling.

Horses are a lot more ‘delicate’ than say, cows. Cows are fed Silage, which is grass that is put in a pit to ferment and then baled. It stinks to high heaven, but has a lot of nutrients cows can use. However I would NOT feed silage to horses.
     
    06-04-2009, 10:36 PM
  #17
Started
Get one of the old fashioned hand mowers, I have one and they work wonderful!
     
    06-04-2009, 11:03 PM
  #18
Green Broke
It's the way the combine cuts it. It lays it down in "sheaves" which are thin and breathable. If you have long long grass, take an old fashioned scythe to it and THAT grass would be suitable for feeding your horses. The mower clumps and churns grass, and spits it out into little fermenting balls of doom. Because they're so thick, the air can't circulate into them and they immediately begin rotting from all the sugars and juices that have been churned into a pulp within the clumbs. A combine lays the crop down flat and even, without destroying the nutrients.

And again, as already said, almost all hay is very different from the typical grass our horses eat.

But yeah, if you're hand cutting the grass and preventing it from clumping, that is safe. The biggest issue with mowers is how badly they mangle the grass. Think about a cherry - if you live it in the sun intact, off the tree, it fairs a lot longer then a squished cherry which begins decomposing almost immediately due to all the sugars being exposed to the elements.

Hope that helped everyone! Personally, I use my grass clippings as smudge piles, I find it's a fantastic way to get rid of them, and still serves a purpose for the horse. A nifty idea is to take an old freezer and completely strip it of all insulation, etc. and just leave a big metal box. Fill it with old straw, clippings, etc. and just let it smolder with the lid barely cracked. The horses can't get to it, can't lit themselves on fire, and the design of it offers so little oxygen, it will do exactly that - smolder. Our horses love it when mosquotes get crazy bad.
     
    06-05-2009, 08:34 AM
  #19
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vidaloco    
Grass cut for hay is different in that it lays and "cures" or drys for days.
Its cut and swathed/raked or sort of rolled into windrows so the air can circulate and dry it. When its dried properly its baled.
Grass that is cut from a mower is left more compact so it pretty much starts to compress and ferment immediately.
Think of the difference in length of the plant cuttings. Grass cut for hay is usually long and easily "fluffed" for drying.
Grass clippings from a mower are short and dense. Its going to just lay there.
I feed some of my grass clippings to my chickens. They eat rotten tomatoes and old lettuce too. I'd never feed that sort of thing to my horses.

ETA I think if you really wanted to give your horse grass clippings, you could immediately after its cut rake and evenly spread it onto a concrete driveway so it could dry properly you could probably feed it to your horse....but who is going to do that?
Thanks, Vida! It makes sense. I do NOT feed my horses mower clippings (and don't plan to :) ), but still was wondering...
     
    06-05-2009, 12:03 PM
  #20
Showing
No problem
It helps that I've been baling hay since my legs where long enough to reach the clutch on the tractor
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

« swellings | Lump? »
Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
greeeeen grass Lizz Horse Pictures 4 05-14-2009 08:21 AM
Grass Founder ansci Horse Health 4 04-09-2009 12:15 AM
Wow! GREEN grass! RedHawk Horse Pictures 7 03-22-2009 06:10 PM
Grass carriedenaee Horse Talk 4 04-24-2008 01:21 PM
rye grass futolympeventer327 Horse Health 0 07-21-2007 03:20 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:00 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0