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post #1 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 04:56 PM Thread Starter
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This thread was copied from an existing thread. Original discussion was left in the Horse pictures section: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-pictures/apollo-field-dandelions-192498/#post2512290

Discussion subject is regarding the toxicity of dandelions and horses.


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Im not tryin to be rude- but you know dandilions are toxic to horses right?


His weight is good. He needs more muscles but will gain that with more rides.. handsom guy!

Last edited by farmpony84; 05-14-2013 at 02:41 PM.
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post #2 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 05:17 PM
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perhaps you are thinking of buttercups.
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post #3 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 05:25 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by tinyliny View Post
perhaps you are thinking of buttercups.

I was reading about how flatweed and dandelion filled pastures were known to cause austrailan stringhalt.. not to be confused with 'regular' stringhalt.
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post #4 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 05:32 PM
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Our field is full of dandelions. All different kinds of horses are on it all summer. Different breed, sizes, ages, even new foal and broodmares. Never heard about them being toxic or had a problem.
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post #5 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 05:44 PM
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Just shows you are never to old to larn, dandelions are toxic to horses

I have been so lucky for the last 40 years.
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post #6 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 05:45 PM
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Spring De-Tox

Dandelion & Nettles in the Horse Diet

The Dandelion ~ Taraxacum officinalis comes into flower in Spring, bringing forth flowers from April to November. The dandelion is a storehouse of minerals especially iron, copper and potash. Copper being especially important as an activator of zinc in the body. Zinc being necessary for wound healing, fertility and white blood cell production. Dandelion also contains more vitamin A & C than most other vegetables and fruit.
Traditionally in Spring, the young leaves have been used in salads to stimulate and cleanse the digestive system, the blood and the kidneys. The leaves have a proven reputation in relieving fluid retention whether due to heart oedema or an excess of sodium and therefore can help to relieve high blood pressure. The high iron content of both leaves and root helps to combat anaemia. The root is used as a liver remedy especially useful in relieving bilious disorders.
Encourage the dandelion to flourish in your pastures; it is non-poisonous and entirely beneficial. A few leaves shredded into a mash feed can only improve your horse’s health.
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post #7 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 05:51 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post
Spring De-Tox

Dandelion & Nettles in the Horse Diet

The Dandelion ~ Taraxacum officinalis comes into flower in Spring, bringing forth flowers from April to November. The dandelion is a storehouse of minerals especially iron, copper and potash. Copper being especially important as an activator of zinc in the body. Zinc being necessary for wound healing, fertility and white blood cell production. Dandelion also contains more vitamin A & C than most other vegetables and fruit.
Traditionally in Spring, the young leaves have been used in salads to stimulate and cleanse the digestive system, the blood and the kidneys. The leaves have a proven reputation in relieving fluid retention whether due to heart oedema or an excess of sodium and therefore can help to relieve high blood pressure. The high iron content of both leaves and root helps to combat anaemia. The root is used as a liver remedy especially useful in relieving bilious disorders.
Encourage the dandelion to flourish in your pastures; it is non-poisonous and entirely beneficial. A few leaves shredded into a mash feed can only improve your horse’s health.

Quote:
Taraxacum officinale Dandelion When infected with a toxic mold that grows on it, the plant has been linked to outbreaks of Australian stringhalt.
If I could copy from my pdf file id paste where it says that grazing on a pasture full of castor, flatweed, and dandelion- horses will show symptoms of 'goose stepping' called 'Australia stringhold'
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post #8 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 05:57 PM
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Well I'll take my years of in the flesh experience over your PDF file I'm afraid.

I am not closed minded to new things, but honestly I don't think I have ever had pastures without dandelions, so on this occasion I'm not going to rein them in

Oh and further research (a couple of random clicks of my mouse)
Quote:



With summer upon us we must be mindful of the likely occurrence of Australian Stringhalt (AS) which occurs in horses grazing drier pastures with poorer soil types and weeds.


Horses severely affected with Stringhalt walk with exaggerated flexion of the hind limbs, often contacting the belly and moving forward with a peculiar bunny hopping gait.
Although the condition is usually not life-threatening, recovery tends to be prolonged often between 6 to 18 months. Muscle wastage can be quite severe.
Although it is recommended that horses be removed from the paddocks they had been grazing, care must be taken that they be moved to a safe area free of obstacles or topographic challenges (like steep hills with dams at the bottom).
One weed that has a particular association with cases of AS is a yellow flowered plant known variously as False Dandelion, Flatweed and Catsear. The botanical name is Hypochoeris radicata (H. Radicata).
Also Illinois is a long way from Aussie land
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post #9 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 06:17 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Golden Horse View Post
Well I'll take my years of in the flesh experience over your PDF file I'm afraid.

I am not closed minded to new things, but honestly I don't think I have ever had pastures without dandelions, so on this occasion I'm not going to rein them in

Oh and further research (a couple of random clicks of my mouse)


Also Illinois is a long way from Aussie land

Lol, dandelion is a flatweed! Its not the actual plant its the mold that grows in the 'flatweed' plants that is toxic and especially in large numbers.. if flatweed is growing in your pastures the soil is not doing well.. the pdf file was only so I could show the actual study of how it causes AS.

Dandelions and other flatweeds grow here too and there are cases of australian stringhalt here in US! I believe that site is a bit outdated..


Ask your veterinarian- make sure he's not a french model, lol.


Quote:
Australian stringhalt was first reported in Australia in the mid-1800s,it has also been seen in New Zealand and the United States. Although Australian stringhalt is idiopathic,it is thought to be induced by toxic plants or fungi and possibly deficiencies in nutrients.
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post #10 of 47 Old 05-13-2013, 06:25 PM
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Aren't Dandelion's what they call "Greens" in the south?? That they just love??

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