diagnosed with.....Navicular :(
 
 

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diagnosed with.....Navicular :(

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  • Equine diagnosed with navicular incorrectly
  • What is navicular and how is it dignosed

 
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    05-21-2009, 11:03 AM
  #1
Foal
diagnosed with.....Navicular :(

Hey there. I took my horse to the vet yesterday and the x-rays and nerve block said that he has navicular. That word has such a baggage behind it, so I was sooo frustrated and sad when she said that. She recomends shoes but he is currently barefoot and likes barefoot. When he has shoes on his feet were really bad, they were very contracted and oval. Not anymore. But he does have underrun heels. Does anybody have suggestions for anything I can do to make him sound or keep him comfortable?
Thanks!
     
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    05-21-2009, 11:06 AM
  #2
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by ticklytiger12    
Hey there. I took my horse to the vet yesterday and the x-rays and nerve block said that he has navicular. That word has such a baggage behind it, so I was sooo frustrated and sad when she said that. She recomends shoes but he is currently barefoot and likes barefoot. When he has shoes on his feet were really bad, they were very contracted and oval. Not anymore. But he does have underrun heels. Does anybody have suggestions for anything I can do to make him sound or keep him comfortable?
Thanks!
Pete Ramey writes about white line disease thrush navicular disease hoof balance

DO NOT LET THEM PUT SHOES ON HER! Find a "natural barefoot trimmer." You can look it up on hoofrehab.com
     
    05-21-2009, 12:30 PM
  #3
Foal
Make sure you find a blacksmith that understands the disease and show him the x-rays so he can trim your horse correctly barefoot or with shoes, whichever you choose.
     
    05-21-2009, 12:46 PM
  #4
Started
What did the xrays show??

Navicular is a catch all term for heel pain..

Our old morgan mare had roatation and was still sound with the RIGHT farrier... you do not want one that is all shoes OR all Barefoot... you want one that will do what is best for each horse each leg each hoof...

Make sure they are moving the breakover point back and relieving as much heel pressure as possible...

There is no catch all way for all horse with navicular and you need a farrier that is willing to step outside the box if need be to fix the problem ..
     
    05-21-2009, 02:22 PM
  #5
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by ticklytiger12    
Does anybody have suggestions for anything I can do to make him sound or keep him comfortable?
Your vet and farrier can review the x-rays and work out a plan. If you want to stay barefoot, ask your vet for farriers you can consult with.
     
    05-21-2009, 03:00 PM
  #6
Foal
Well...the x-rays showed that along the navicular bone he has a wavey bone coming out of it. It is suppose to be smooth. But what is weird is when she did the hoof testers, he didnt not even FLINCH when she tested him in the frog and heels. But when she tested his sole he wasent having it! It hurt alot. So what im thinking is he is probly mostly lame from the sole because he has very sensitive soles. He even lands heel first all of the time. (rarely dosent) So I was thinking about getting a pair of Simple Boots because I have heard good things about them and they are recomended for horses with thin and tender soles and navicular. Worth a try! But also, I realy didnt like the vet. When she was holding him, he was acting up because he was just nerve blocked and the needle hurt so he was bouncing aournd so she culdnt do it again. So she took him and jerked EXTREMELY hard severl times. I have never poped him in my life. He was so caught of gaurd. And when she3 hoof tested him on the sole he was seriously trying to get away and she said 'oh it dosent hurt that bad!'. COME ON! If it didnt he woulnt be moving! But it's over now. So what do you think of my idea?? You can suggest some more of yours!!!
     
    05-21-2009, 04:40 PM
  #7
Yearling
GO GET A 2ND OPINION! Sounds like that vet was a crack pot and you wasted your money...no offense. Go to an equine specialist if you have one. Get digital xrays...the old fashioned kind really just don't show anything compared to the digital stuff.
     
    05-21-2009, 06:07 PM
  #8
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotreddun    
GO GET A 2ND OPINION! Sounds like that vet was a crack pot and you wasted your money...no offense. Go to an equine specialist if you have one. Get digital xrays...the old fashioned kind really just don't show anything compared to the digital stuff.
I second this one!! That does NOT sound like navicular at all
     
    05-21-2009, 07:34 PM
  #9
Yearling
As for underrun heels, don't you need shoes to correct this? Just curious, but I thought there was a shoe that made up for lack of heel and made the horse more comfortable until the heel (correct me if I'm wrong) grew back.
     
    05-21-2009, 07:44 PM
  #10
Started
That vet does sound kind of odd. I definitely think you should get a second opinion. I found an online article that might help as well and I've highlighted the parts I thought might be important for you:

>> Characterized by gradually increasing intermittent lameness often of both front feet, navicular disease is one diagnosis no horse owner wants to hear. This disease is often associated with hard work, and is incurable.
Affected horses will shorten their stride, most noticeably when going downhill, and can be reluctant to turn. Sometimes the lameness can seem to 'switch' from one side to the other. This is due to the disease affecting both front feet to different degrees. However, some veterinarians feel that navicular disease (or as it is sometimes called, navicular syndrome) is overdiagnosed. Knowing more can help you decide what to do if your horse is diagnosed with navicular disease.

First of all, what is navicular disease? This disorder is caused by a gradual deterioration of the navicular bone at the back of the horse's foot, near the heel. Some veterinarians will diagnose navicular syndrome, using the term to broadly include all the soft tissue surrounding the navicular bone.

Veterinarians aren't sure exactly what causes the bone to deteriorate, but most feel that navicular disease is a degenerative condition like arthritis. Frequently, navicular disease strikes horses that perform hard work, often on hard surfaces. Once thought to be an extremely common condition, many veterinarians now think that it is less common than was once believed.

Foot problems are the leading cause of lameness. However, before accepting a diagnosis of navicular disease, there are other factors that the veterinarian should consider.

While there are certain people who believe the shape of the hoof can indicate that a horse is at greater risk for navicular disease--such as horses with upright, small hooves, or horses with large, platter-like hooves--there is not much evidence that hoof shape is a very important risk factor. However, some risk factors are proven, such as performance horses that spend more time running hard, and in whom the condition is most bothersome. Also, age is a factor, with navicular disease most often striking horses between seven and eleven years of age.

The signs of true navicular disease can be identical with those of sore heels, which can complicate the diagnostic process. "Pointing," which refers to a horse standing with its front feet far in front of its body, is a common symptom of both navicular disease and sore or bruised heels. Also, riders may notice the horse is reluctant to turn, another shared symptom.

Many diseases can mimic navicular disease besides sore or bruised heels. Chronic heel collapse is another, as is a torn deep flexor tendon at the point where it inserts into the coffin bone. Simple stress and strain from overwork can result in a horse showing the symptoms of navicular disease. The soft tissues around the navicular bone can also be strained, such as the impar ligament or the suspensory ligaments surrounding the bone. The coffin joint can also become inflamed. The list is long and this is not a complete list of things which share the symptoms of navicular disease, which is why it is important that the veterinarian not jump to this diagnosis without more tests.

No one test can definitively diagnose true navicular disease. A diagnosis is made by performing a series of tests--hoof tests, nerve blocks, x-rays, stress tests, bone scans--and reviewing all the results to find the most likely cause of the horse's lameness. Studies are progressing regarding the use of ultrasound or MRI to help veterinarians to determine what is going on inside the foot.

Many veterinarians will not diagnose navicular disease until the horse has failed to respond to any treatment for at least ninety days. Keeping all this in mind might help if your veterinarian diagnoses navicular disease after only a cursory examination.

In the case of true navicular disease, caused by the deterioration of the horse's navicular bone, there is no cure. However, horses affected by navicular disease can be made more comfortable in a variety of ways. New shoeing and trimming techniques can relieve stress on the bone, and pain-relieving and anti-inflammatory medications can also help. In horses that are more severely affected, the only effective treatment may be to remove the nerves to the area via a surgical neurectomy. While this does give relief from the heel pain, it is only a temporary solution.

Surgical neurectomies can produce occasional side effects. Most commonly (but still only rarely seen) are neuromas. These painful lumps are caused when the ends of the severed nerves grow back together in a large ball, forming a lump which can be felt under the skin. Very rarely, a horse may experience a complication which could necessitate the amputation of the foot, but this is extremely uncommon.

More commonly, horses will have bad results if they receive a neurectomy when they do not have true navicular disease. For example, if the horse's lameness is due to a deep flexor tendon problem rather than the navicular bone, the horse can severely damage that tendon because it will be unable to feel the pain from the injury.

If your veterinarian diagnoses navicular disease, it is therefore prudent to seek a second opinion. Presenting a second veterinarian with the films from the bone scan and x-rays can allow him to give an opinion without putting your horse--and your wallet!--through another round of tests. Taking the time to do this can prevent a costly and painful misdiagnosis. <<

From http://www.horses-and-horse-informat...lsuspect.shtml


Maybe your horse doesn't have navicular after all!
     

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