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Do you see lameness? (video)

This is a discussion on Do you see lameness? (video) within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        10-14-2011, 12:48 AM
      #21
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Horsesdontlie    
    Thank you. I've been considering putting him barefoot (As I've heard that helps with horses having issues with sidebone...) After the vet looks at him I'll consider it more.
    Yeah, just try to educate yourself as much as possible & you'll be better able to make appropriate decisions for your horse in his situation & know how to make it work. The thread in my signature link has some more links & info to help get you started.

    Quote:
    I've always had my horses shod and not sure how to transition into barefoot and what kind of care would be needed to help transition?
    With him, you might not be 'transitioning' to bare, but using boots instead of shoes. How old is he by the way? Initially at least, it appears to me this horse will not be comfortable on his feet and has little effective 'armour', so he'll need protection/support. His feet will get gradually stronger as he's able to use them comfortably & correctly and may become quite healthy & strong. Depending on diet, environment, etc, then I may start to 'transition' him to going bare. *But* realistically, I don't think you can 'turn the clock back' and create fantastic 'rock crunching' feet from a long term damaged set. You can improve, but not always 'fix'. Also depending on his management, it may not be conducive to his developing strong enough feet to go everywhere bare. Therefore you could be looking at always having to boot him on some surfaces at least. Not meaning to put a dampener on it - I'm all for shoeless, esp for 'problem feet', but I don't think it helps to go into it with rose coloured glasses either.

    Quote:
    One horse we had that I tried went lame because he was barefoot, another had his hoof constantly chipping and wearing down too fast. I've heard of supplements can help build stronger hooves...
    That one horse may have had thin soles, 'sub clinical' laminitis, his feet weren't conditioned to rough surfaces, etc. Learning to know what you're dealing with & providing adequate protection when necessary is so important I reckon. Constant chipping can be due to incorrect/imbalanced trimming, leaving walls too long, infection or metabolic/nutritional probs causing the walls to be extra weak. Wearing down too fast can be due to weakness too, but I find it's not overly common but is often perception - people are used to seeing peripherally loaded hooves - soles jacked up off the ground, either by shoes or long walls and when they see walls worn down to sole level they panic. Also depends on the environment I reckon as to whether walls should be level or longer than the outer sole.

    Yes, diet & nutrition are very important to growing healthy, strong feet. In that thread you should find some relevant links on that subject, but safergrass.org & feedxl.com are 2 goodies.

    Quote:
    I know of a barefoot trimmer that already comes to our stables. If I want to switch I know she specializes in barefoot and shaping the hoof up well. I'm just tired of switching farriers because of bad work!
    Yeah I'd tend to err on the side of finding a good barefoot trimmer rather than a traditional farrier myself, but there are bad, ignorant & ill-informed BFT's abounding out there(not to mention a few different approaches), just as there are bad farriers, so do your homework & learn what to look for, & if you find a good farrier, they should do just as good a job as a BFT. Just that IMO they either don't tend to know, or at least don't impart much on issues of diet, nutrition, management, etc which can also be vital parts of the 'puzzle'.
         
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        10-14-2011, 01:10 AM
      #22
    Yearling
    Loosie - that's what I've been trying to do, just get as much info as possible. Then on top of that trying to find valid information is harder. I've actually started looking for books with information on shoeing to learn more myself. I would love to be able to spot a good/bad farrier job as I can only spot out minimal things.

    He is older we are guessing around 20-22. I know that we have almost always had him shod. He went one winter barefoot and did fine, but that was when I wasn't riding. I've seen horses with boots and they seem rather large and clunky, is that only something a horse can walk in?

    I know his issue could be anything but if it is a hoof problem like this, am I looking at semi-retirement? Ideally I would hope that some lay off and corrective shoeing would make him sound. But what kind of soundness am I looking at? Will he be stuck as a low level dressage and trail horse or do others become sound enough for harder work? Ideally I would love to be able to jump him again and maybe do low level eventing. Though I am not willing to put his health on the line or give him up because he can't. I would just like to know what to expect. If he becomes unrideable or only a minimal walk/trot horse he has a 2 acre pasture waiting for him to happily retire on for the remainder of his life.

    As you see from the pictures I have posted, both on the sidebone thread and then here, is my farrier starting to improve on his feet as is? Or should I be looking for another farrier?

    Thank you so much btw. I'm just eating up this information. I'll look into the links you have provided too.
         
        10-14-2011, 03:37 AM
      #23
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Horsesdontlie    
    Loosie - that's what I've been trying to do, just get as much info as possible. Then on top of that trying to find valid information is harder.
    :roll: I feel your pain! Good for you for making the effort. I think all we can do is try to gather info from a variety of sources, objective if possible, look at the principles behind different approaches and weight up the pros & cons & arguments. We all can only do the best we can according to the knowledge that we have at the time.

    Quote:
    I know his issue could be anything but if it is a hoof problem like this, am I looking at semi-retirement? ...I would just like to know what to expect.
    Wouldn't we all! Sorry, but there's so much hypothetical about this and so many factors to consider that may influence the outcome *assuming it is only his feet* that 'who knows' is the only answer. He may be a horse that requires boots for any work, which depending on local rules may restrict you from dressage comps... until they change that silly rule:roll:, and boots can also sometimes be problematic for jumping, but otherwise, they shouldn't slow you down.

    Quote:
    is my farrier starting to improve on his feet as is? Or should I be looking for another farrier?
    Again, can't say. In the first pics on other thread, they're not nice looking, but without more info, couldn't begin to assume it was the farrier's fault necessarily. Also only have that one angle. In your pics in this thread, I don't like the shoe job personally, for reasons I've given.
         
        10-14-2011, 03:51 AM
      #24
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by loosie    
    :roll: I feel your pain! Good for you for making the effort. I think all we can do is try to gather info from a variety of sources, objective if possible, look at the principles behind different approaches and weight up the pros & cons & arguments. We all can only do the best we can according to the knowledge that we have at the time.



    Wouldn't we all! Sorry, but there's so much hypothetical about this and so many factors to consider that may influence the outcome *assuming it is only his feet* that 'who knows' is the only answer. He may be a horse that requires boots for any work, which depending on local rules may restrict you from dressage comps... until they change that silly rule:roll:, and boots can also sometimes be problematic for jumping, but otherwise, they shouldn't slow you down.



    Again, can't say. In the first pics on other thread, they're not nice looking, but without more info, couldn't begin to assume it was the farrier's fault necessarily. Also only have that one angle. In your pics in this thread, I don't like the shoe job personally, for reasons I've given.
    I kind of thought so! Its all just a guessing game, well you have given me tons of information to sift through while I am still waiting for the vet to call me back. (I'm close to trying to call another one!) I'll post an update when I get a vet out. Thanks again.
         

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