dying breed? - Page 3
 
 

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dying breed?

This is a discussion on dying breed? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

     
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        03-07-2011, 05:35 PM
      #21
    Foal
    Update!

    So update on our new lesson girls. We are coming up on two months with our new students and out of the 12 that went through last clinic two quit entirely at our barn and moved their horses to a "better facility" (in other words they moved to a new barn that would let them show up and climb on their already saddled mount ride and then throw said mount still tacked back into the cross ties and go home leaving someone to handle pesky details like untacking and cooling out and what not).

    Of the other 10 that we have managed to keep with us about 7 are showing some real improvement. They are really interested in learn about their horses health care and seem to be picking up what we cover very easily. The other three are learning the material that is given to them but they are still struggling to see how feeding scheduals and shoeing scheduals and cleaning stalls is anyone's business but their grooms (which is not a service we offer but they seem to think that we should). Still they are sticking with it and putting in the effort and that's the important part.

    I am very pleased with the majority of our new girls and my trainer has set me up with a weekly 2 hour mini clinic on saturdays so that these girls (and of course anyone else in the barn who wants to attend) can come and spend some extra time with the horses and learning more horsemanship skills if they want to and most show up almost every saturday which is very good to see.

    I agree with you guys that as horse owners no one can be expected to know everything about every horse subject and I don't think that anyone should have to know every aspect about their horses at the drop of a hat BUT I think that we as horse people are responsible for atleast getting resources in place to help us be it an older more experienced horse person in our lives, a trainer, lesson instructor, books or even an internet forum like this one. I don't fault people for their lack of knowledge BUT I do feel that you CAN/SHOULD be held accountable for you lack of interest or effort in aquiring RELEVENT INFO about your horse. As in if you feed hay you should know WHAT hay you do feed or what grain you are on, etc. even if you don't know the specific names or brands I do think people should know what looks normal for their horse and what is not normal. I am so pleased that we kept the majority of our new students but I still think that more people, more instructors need to look a little farther than the saddle when considering their students horse educations and I would love to see more people set up clinics or atleast add more basic info into their everyday lessons. Its a little extra work BUT sometimes the effort is more than worth the rewards.....
         
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        03-07-2011, 06:32 PM
      #22
    Trained
    Part of the reason I take such pride in my horse and my riding is because I manage him myself. I have assembled a team which works together with him and me to create an athlete.
    When we compete my vet tries to come watch as as often as possible because he also takes pride in the horse.
    My farrier often re-arranges her whole schedule to come to do just my one horse at our barn because he is on a four week schedule because she takes pride in the horse.
    Etc..

    I really think equine management is the key to success in competition. Understanding how nutrition, healthcare, farriery, etc.. all combines to make an athlete is what gets you that extra 5% in the dressage arena, shaves off those last few seconds in the jumper ring, etc.. As much as riding is very important and represents the bulk of competetive success, knowing your horse is what is going to get you to the very tip top.

    I really like how your stable runs!! I have to go out and PAY for courses like that, I would kill to have a barn provide that for me!!
         
        03-07-2011, 06:54 PM
      #23
    Weanling
    I know a lot about general horse care, but unfortunately I do not know much about feed. I have never been to a barn (only one that I only was at 3 times for a week each) that taught me about it, or a barn that even had enough options to teach me about it (save for the barn in the last set of parentheses). But, based on my previous knowledge, I could probably make some educated guesses. Like alfalfa has a certain smell to it. It smells hay-y. THAT I would know.
         
        03-07-2011, 07:13 PM
      #24
    Foal
    Anebel- I like it too we are very lucky to have such a nice barn in our area. I do have to drive about 45 min to get there and its not cheap but I love the dedication to education and I love my trainer. I agree with you as well I think that horse care and management helps bond you and your horse and gives you that extra edge that people who don't know their horses as well don't have. You are extremely lucky to have a shoer and vet who work so well with you. I wish I could find a decent reliable shoer. Mine retired a year ago due to health issues and now we are having a devil of a time replacing him.....

    Its so true what you hear these days "good help is hard to find".....
         
        03-07-2011, 07:19 PM
      #25
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by luvsmygirls    
    Anebel- I like it too we are very lucky to have such a nice barn in our area. I do have to drive about 45 min to get there and its not cheap but I love the dedication to education and I love my trainer. I agree with you as well I think that horse care and management helps bond you and your horse and gives you that extra edge that people who don't know their horses as well don't have. You are extremely lucky to have a shoer and vet who work so well with you. I wish I could find a decent reliable shoer. Mine retired a year ago due to health issues and now we are having a devil of a time replacing him.....

    Its so true what you hear these days "good help is hard to find".....
    Mine is actually quite young and is just fresh out of school - all of the techniques are still very fresh in her head, however she is not always sure how to manage things. I actually started working with her because my vet had been using her and I was in a similar farrier dilemma. In the beginning it was a bit rocky but my vet and I worked together to get her "on the program". Since then it has been a really great relationship and she works really well with my vet, who supervises every second or third shoeing.
    I also have a massage therapist for Ro who really helps me find his weak spots and alerts me to things which may become an issue - he also loves his massages. Finally I try to do as much work on nutrition as I can with some help from my vet. I have done tons of research into what ratios to maintain and which minerals to feed. I am really lucky that there is a feed company in my area that developed a feed very specific to my needs, so I mostly feed that. And the barn I am at has wonderful hay!!!
         
        03-07-2011, 07:34 PM
      #26
    Yearling
    I'm a farm-raised child so I know alot of this, and I'm the main person who takes care of all of the animals on my parents farm. I know what they get fed, when they get shod, how much these expenses are and what not. Don't pay the money because I don't have it, but I do take care of everyone.

    When I'm in agriculture class I have zero hope for those students. They don't know anything about agriculture. We are in Wisconsin, too. A very farmed part of Wisconsin where you can't drive to far without seeing a farm. Even the simpliest of things they can't even understand the slightest. They hardly knew what pollination was. -.-

    And this is the same for everything. And defiantely some things should just be common knowledge. Like for people who own a dog should know the difference between a choke chain and a flat-buckle collar. Just like someone who has a horse should know something about the care of there horse! They obviously can't have a connection with these animals if all they are is a pet that they can play with, but doesn't eat/poop/drink or get their hooves/teeth done and need veterinary check-ups, shots along with needing to be prepared for riding. This is just plain irresponsibility and someone who does not have to take care of their animals as a child and doesn't have responsibilities as a child isn't going to do very well as an adult. So, they can ride a horse, but can they even take care of themselves or others?

    Rediculous. Things like this just anger me.
         
        03-07-2011, 08:52 PM
      #27
    Banned
    Luvsmygirls, sounds like you have lucked out and found a wonderful barn. The majority of barns that I have known, don't even offer something like this, so it doesn't surprise me that the new girls didn't know that stuff at all, and really that's not their fault.

    It's good news that a couple of them moved on to somewhere else as there lack of interest will not affect the others.

    Keep doing what you do, sounds like you are doing wonderfully.
         

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