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extreme weightloss

This is a discussion on extreme weightloss within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

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        01-30-2012, 07:51 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    He looked very bad last week, it seems to me like he's maybe filling out a bit, or maybe he just feels better. Last week his coat was very dull and flat, it should be noted that Phoenix was an easy keeper, he was fat; over the last few years he's been dieting and losing weight with exercise, he was a blimp only 2 years ago.

    I think the fact that he looks so skinny now just freaks me out, plus he did drop a lot of weight with his illness, he still had a cresty neck and fat on his butt which is completely gone now. He went from a horse that was just touching his weight loss goal to a skinny awful looking horse in less than a month. Put it this way, he lost so much muscle/weight from his back that his saddle doesn't fit at all now.

    I can't decide what type of hay he's fed, I also can't provide hay myself for him. (barn rules)
         
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        01-30-2012, 07:58 PM
      #12
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by CLaPorte432    
    Chances are, he is going to end up sick again. I'm sure his immune system is still low and recovering from the illness in December. If he's exposed to it again, chances are he's going to end up getting sick again.

    The sooner he gets moved the better. He may not pull through it next time without a healthy immune system to start. :(

    I hope you find someplace affordable. And fast. If you do, make sure to let the new place know about his illness and quarantine him for 4 weeks instead of 2. Just to be on the safe side.

    Great job pulling him through. Horses are very difficult to deal with when they get so sick. He still looks pretty miserable in that picture you posted.
    I know. He was coughing up all kinds of nasty stuff and has some pretty decent injections of antibiotics. He's definitely not 100% yet, esp since he's so skinny and still feeling the effects of the illness. He seemed to get a lot sicker than the other horse that came into the barn and brought the flu with him.

    I'm keeping a close eye on him and might take him up to a barn I know for a while to get him pulled through and well again. I would definitely tell a new BO that he was sick and would expect him to be quarantined. The problem was that a new horse came in and wasn't qt'd properly and he's spread this illness around.

    He's not liking the mud I can tell you, he did enjoy running around the arena, which is what he did just before I took the photo. He's perked up a bit in the last week. I'll keep a close eye on him and make sure he's removed from the herd if he even looks the slightest bit ill again.

    I feel bad for the other horses, we have some pretty old guys, a few are over 30 and 1 is blind and very prone to infections, he gets them in his eyes a lot. I just hope none of the old timers get ill.
         
        01-30-2012, 08:09 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Is he maybe not eating all the hay if its been tossed in the mud? And I don't think 24/7 outside is good for a sick or just sick horse...maybe see about bringing him in at night and giving him hay for the night to have? I havent read through the whole form...but that's just my suggestion.
    And I absolutely agree with trying to find him a new stable to be at, and best of luck with him getting better! <3
         
        01-30-2012, 08:14 PM
      #14
    Trained
    Is there anyway you could get him into a pen by himself and let him free choice feed?
         
        01-31-2012, 03:58 PM
      #15
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by daaybreak    
    Is he maybe not eating all the hay if its been tossed in the mud? And I don't think 24/7 outside is good for a sick or just sick horse...maybe see about bringing him in at night and giving him hay for the night to have? I havent read through the whole form...but that's just my suggestion.
    And I absolutely agree with trying to find him a new stable to be at, and best of luck with him getting better! <3
    If it's in the mud then they're probably not eating all of it. I could see about maybe having them keep him in at night to feed him more.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by WSArabians    
    Is there anyway you could get him into a pen by himself and let him free choice feed?

    He had this while he was sick and they didn't throw enough to keep him eating all day. They probably wouldn't if I asked again.
         
        01-31-2012, 04:00 PM
      #16
    Yearling
    Where do you live? Maybe someone on here knows a decent barn in your area, or someone who'd be willing to board him at their house. It seems to me that your #1 priority should be finding a new place to board – and fast!
         
        02-01-2012, 03:19 AM
      #17
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by phoenix    
    He looked very bad last week, it seems to me like he's maybe filling out a bit, or maybe he just feels better. Last week his coat was very dull and flat, it should be noted that Phoenix was an easy keeper, he was fat; over the last few years he's been dieting and losing weight with exercise, he was a blimp only 2 years ago.

    I think the fact that he looks so skinny now just freaks me out, plus he did drop a lot of weight with his illness, he still had a cresty neck and fat on his butt which is completely gone now. He went from a horse that was just touching his weight loss goal to a skinny awful looking horse in less than a month. Put it this way, he lost so much muscle/weight from his back that his saddle doesn't fit at all now.

    I can't decide what type of hay he's fed, I also can't provide hay myself for him. (barn rules)
    If he's been long term obese, is it possible that he's not really thin but you're just too used to seeing him fat? If he still had a crest & fat deposits on him bum despite being thin elsewhere, it sounds like he could possibly be insulin resistant, which could also be effecting the weight & in which case I'd be very hesitant to feed him any grain or high starch and I'd be inclined to speak to an equine nutritionist or such. Katy Watts | Safergrass.org is one good site for some more info on the subject.

    But seriously, even if he's not too thin now, esp considering other health issues & you have no control over him even getting enough hay, it's likely to become more of a problem for him, so hopefully you've started your search for a better place for him.
         
        02-01-2012, 05:41 AM
      #18
    Yearling
    A few ideas. First, I agree with others that you need to move him. When a horse has been ill they are probably going to require some extra TLC to get back to normal once the illnes shas passed. The owner/manager of that barn seems to want to do very little in that way and it would definitely throw up some red flags if a barn manager wouldn't let me supply my own hay/grain etc for my own horse as a supplement to what was already being fed. On that note:

    Antibiotics play nasty games with digestion anyway as it kills off the good "bugs" and as a horse loses weight (not excess as in overweight but like this situation) it can throw off the proper absorption of nutrients which plays agasint you if you are trying to get the horse to gain weight.

    Thehorse I just bought is underweight though not excessivley so and lacks muscle; he was an OTTB who was pastured for two years before being sold off at auction again. I spoke with an equine nutritionist who indicated a supplement that has both prebiotics and probiotics is a good start to get the digestive system back in line. I use the Smartpak SmartDigest Ultra for that though another one recommended was LifeForce from Alltech, Inc. The other thing that was recommended and I implemented was adding Rice Bran pellets to the feed. This has increased fat to help with weight gain without adding the extra protein that can cause a horse to get hot. If you go that route, feed it in gradually. I started with 2 cups a day for a week and then upped it to 4. The max amount is 8 cups per day and recommended time for adjustment is a month.

    Since my horse is in work and needed muscle I also added a muscle build supplement which also contains a small amount of rice bran. He's been on the additions for just under two weeks so I can't make a definitive statement that things are working but he is active, eating just like a horse :), happy and interested in eveything that is going on..which is an improvement from when I first saw him. He wasn't unhealthy but the sense I got was that he wasn't interested in things...if that makes sense.
         

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