Fatal Equine Disease - 12 Dead in Nebraska - The Horse Forum
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post #1 of 23 Old 07-15-2013, 04:28 PM Thread Starter
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Fatal Equine Disease - 12 Dead in Nebraska

Twelve cases of a fatal equine disease have been confirmed by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture.

According to the department, equine infectious anemia was found in one horse herd in northwestern Nebraska.

State Veterinarian Dr. Dennis Hughes says EIA only affects horses, mules and donkeys and is usually fatal. Other animals and humans are unable to become infected with this disease.

Hughes says there are no treatment options currently available for infected horses.

Symptoms of EIA include: fever, depression, weight loss, swelling and anemia. Producers with horses, donkeys or mules that exhibit these symptoms are urged to contact their veterinarian immediately.

EIA is a blood borne disease that is typically transmitted by biting insects such as horseflies and deer flies, in addition to transmission through infected needles.

Horse owners are being encouraged to take biosecurity precautions to reduce the risk of infection in their herd. Such precautions include: implementing control measures such as husbandry practices that reduce biting insects, not sharing needles between horses and giving a Coggins test before allowing equine intermingling.

For more information, go to Nebraska Department of Agriculture.

Equine Disease Hits Herd in Northwestern Nebraska - KHGI-TV/KWNB-TV/KHGI-CD-Grand Island, Kearney, Hastings

This disease is incurable and most horses infected are under state protocol to be euthanised and disposed of properly.
Anyone in the area who hasn't gotten this vaccine yet, I would highly suggest it.
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post #2 of 23 Old 07-15-2013, 04:41 PM
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There is vaccine for EIA as far as I know.
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post #3 of 23 Old 07-15-2013, 04:46 PM
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EQUINE INFECTIOUS ANEMIA: The Only Protection is Prevention - AAEP
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THE ONLY PROTECTION IS PREVENTION

There is no effective treatment for EIA. There is no vaccine to prevent it. There is no cure. However, good management can reduce the potential of infection. The following guidelines will help:

  • Use disposable needles and syringes (one per horse) when administering vaccines and medications.
  • Sterilize dental tools and other instruments before using them on another horse.
  • Test all horses for EIA at least annually.
  • Test horses at the time of purchase examination.
  • Stable owners, horse show and event managers should require and verify current negative Coggins certificates for all horses entering the premises.
  • New horses should be quarantined for 45 days and observed for any signs of illness, including elevated temperatures, before introducing them to the herd. They should be retested if exposure to EIA is suspected at a 45-day interval.
  • All stable areas should be kept clean, dry and waste-free. Good pasture management techniques should also be practiced. Remove manure and provide adequate drainage to discourage breeding sites for pests.
  • Horses that are at greater risk (such as animals who are in frequent contact with outside horses or who live or travel in geographic regions known for EIA outbreaks) should be tested more frequently, ideally every four to six months.
USDA - APHIS - Animal Health - Equine Infectious Anemia
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There is no vaccine or treatment for the disease.
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post #4 of 23 Old 07-15-2013, 04:52 PM
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Not that this has anything to do with this but...
We had a small bout of Herpes in some of the race horses around here. It started in Ontario and spread to Nova Scotia and Quebec.

And no, there is no vaccine for EIA, but a blood test is pulled. Called a 'Coggins'

Horses are scared of two things... Things that move and things that don't.
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post #5 of 23 Old 07-16-2013, 12:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Ray MacDonald View Post
<snip> And no, there is no vaccine for EIA, but a blood test is pulled. Called a 'Coggins' <snip>
And since there is no vaccine, a clean Coggins is a useless piece of paper. All it does is make the owner feel good. Since there is no vaccine to offer protection, there is no way to say the horse is still clear just moments after the blood is drawn.

If there were a vaccine, then your piece of paper would mean, once you got the test and the vaccine, that your horse could not be positive. Then it would actually be useful.

Right now, all we can do is keep our ears and eyes open and keep ourselves informed and aware.

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post #6 of 23 Old 07-16-2013, 12:09 AM
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Sorry, Faydesmom, but Coggins testing is a proven way to reduce incidence of the disease.

Everyone, in all regions, should get their horses tested for EIA yearly, and ones who travel to compete year round, should get it twice yearly. Yes, as soon as the blood is drawn it is possible for the horse to get infected and for it not to be detected until the next test. However, if we create a culture of doing regular tests then we can catch any budding outbreaks sooner and have carriers of the disease put down sooner, before infecting more horses.

The same argument can be said for pap smears and mammograms - and yet most women still go through with these tests at an interval recommended by their doctor.

It is about population health, especially with any communicable disease. Can you imagine if no one tested regularly for AIDS??

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahss/e...info_sheet.pdf

There is a small fact sheet, there is also a larger, more recent study done with a map of EIA cases detected by year versus # of horses tested that I can't find..

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post #7 of 23 Old 07-16-2013, 12:24 AM
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Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~ View Post
Sorry, Faydesmom, but Coggins testing is a proven way to reduce incidence of the disease.

Everyone, in all regions, should get their horses tested for EIA yearly, and ones who travel to compete year round, should get it twice yearly. Yes, as soon as the blood is drawn it is possible for the horse to get infected and for it not to be detected until the next test. However, if we create a culture of doing regular tests then we can catch any budding outbreaks sooner and have carriers of the disease put down sooner, before infecting more horses.

The same argument can be said for pap smears and mammograms - and yet most women still go through with these tests at an interval recommended by their doctor.

It is about population health, especially with any communicable disease. Can you imagine if no one tested regularly for AIDS??

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahss/e...info_sheet.pdf

There is a small fact sheet, there is also a larger, more recent study done with a map of EIA cases detected by year versus # of horses tested that I can't find..
I didn't say NOT to test, I said the piece of paper you hold is useless.

Big difference.

Piece of paper or not, there is nothing we can do except keep aware and alert about what's going on around us.

Live well, laugh often, love deeply...An' it harm none.
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post #8 of 23 Old 07-16-2013, 12:27 AM
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Originally Posted by FaydesMom View Post
I didn't say NOT to test, I said the piece of paper you hold is useless.

Big difference.

Piece of paper or not, there is nothing we can do except keep aware and alert about what's going on around us.
Unfortunately that's not enough.

I personally refuse to attend events during the buggy seasons where a Coggins test is not required.

Demanding testing is the only way to ensure eradication of the disease. If people around you are not in the habit of testing, there could be an outbreak down the road and you would not know until your own horses were sick. Same with group trail rides, shows, clinics, etc..
Testing is the only way to ensure your horses, and the horses of others are not sick.

They say money doesn't buy happiness -- well happiness doesn't buy horses!
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post #9 of 23 Old 07-16-2013, 12:34 AM
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Is it in arizona? What can you do IF your horse has it?
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post #10 of 23 Old 07-16-2013, 12:34 AM
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That piece of paper is not useless, it indicates that you've tested......and by testing you are avoiding the possibility of transmitting EIA to other non-positive horses and being able to implement quarantines and divert an outbreak.

An ounce of prevent is worth a pound of cure.....and there is no cure, so all we can do is prevent transmission as best we can.
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