Fatal Equine Disease - 12 Dead in Nebraska - Page 2
   

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Fatal Equine Disease - 12 Dead in Nebraska

This is a discussion on Fatal Equine Disease - 12 Dead in Nebraska within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Fatal disease quotes
  • EIA-positive horse sanctuary

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    07-16-2013, 12:57 AM
  #11
Trained
When I lived in Italy there was an outbreak in Siena. ALL horses were tested, by law. Very few positive horses were found country wide, later on it was said it was transmitted by a contaminated transfusion imported from Romania. Big scare, and yearly mandatory testing. A horse sanctuary took some positive horses in, they live out, in a herd, far away from other equines, and ALL horses are still alive. This caused a huge discussion about what danger the disease actually is. I don't know what the current status of the herd is, there were no laws in place as to what needs to be done with positive horses other than quarantine them for life at least 2 kilometers away from other equines or stalled in screened box stalls. I'll have to do some research, I guess.....
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    07-16-2013, 12:57 AM
  #12
Weanling
Quote:
Testing is the only way to ensure your horses, and the horses of others are not sick.
Quote:
by testing you are avoiding the possibility of transmitting EIA to other non-positive horses and being able to implement quarantines and divert an outbreak
Again, I did NOT say testing is useless, everybody needs to test. I said the piece of paper is useless the moment the blood is drawn.

I'm sorry, but too many people think their little piece of paper means their horse is disease free and safe until it expires. Horses are NEVER safe from this disease. Too many people think that just because they have that piece of paper, they don't have to do anything else to prevent infection. Piece of paper or not, we must be aware of what's going on around us and do our utmost to prevent transmission.
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    07-16-2013, 01:03 AM
  #13
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by FaydesMom    
Again, I did NOT say testing is useless, everybody needs to test. I said the piece of paper is useless the moment the blood is drawn.

I'm sorry, but too many people think their little piece of paper means their horse is disease free and safe until it expires. Horses are NEVER safe from this disease. Too many people think that just because they have that piece of paper, they don't have to do anything else to prevent infection. Piece of paper or not, we must be aware of what's going on around us and do our utmost to prevent transmission.
Nope, I didn't say you said testing was useless. But the piece of paper is a means to keep people accountable for testing and it is also a means for biocontrol when there is an outbreak, a tracking system of where and when horses were tested to identify the source of initial transmission.
     
    07-16-2013, 01:06 AM
  #14
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by KigerQueen    
Is it in arizona? What can you do IF your horse has it?
Nothing, your horse will be killed unless you can keep it away from all other horses or in a screened stall- for life. Your horse may never be sick or infect others but a positive test is basically a death sentence.
The disease itself is not always fatal but a positive test always is.

Testing is not done in all States & in most of those that test it is not mandatory.
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    07-17-2013, 07:54 PM
  #15
Green Broke
The piece of paper is important... It is documentation that when the blood was drawn, your horse was neg.
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    07-17-2013, 08:55 PM
  #16
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
When I lived in Italy there was an outbreak in Siena. ALL horses were tested, by law. Very few positive horses were found country wide, later on it was said it was transmitted by a contaminated transfusion imported from Romania. Big scare, and yearly mandatory testing. A horse sanctuary took some positive horses in, they live out, in a herd, far away from other equines, and ALL horses are still alive. This caused a huge discussion about what danger the disease actually is. I don't know what the current status of the herd is, there were no laws in place as to what needs to be done with positive horses other than quarantine them for life at least 2 kilometers away from other equines or stalled in screened box stalls. I'll have to do some research, I guess.....
Along those lines, I remember reading there an outbreak of "swamp fever" (as it used to be commonly referred to) amongst the Chincoteague (sp?) island horses. There was an expectation of a wiped out herd but in the end only a few head perished.

I sometimes wonder about the testing method. As I understand it the test looks for antibodies in the horse rather than the virus itself. If that is the case, does it mean in each and every instance a horse is carrying the antibody also carries the virus (and thus capable of passing it on) or does it mean a horse has been exposed but does not actually have the disease (similar to being vaccinated for west nile, for example - you would see the antibodies obviously but the virus is not present)?
     
    07-17-2013, 09:02 PM
  #17
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by WSArabians    
Anyone in the area who hasn't gotten this vaccine yet, I would highly suggest it.

Unfortunately, there is no vaccine available.
     
    07-17-2013, 09:48 PM
  #18
Green Broke
This outbreak happened quite a bit ago. Actually last month they found another EIA positive horse in MN. So it is moving. Especially concerning now since the bugs are so horrible.
     
    07-17-2013, 09:49 PM
  #19
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chevaux    
Along those lines, I remember reading there an outbreak of "swamp fever" (as it used to be commonly referred to) amongst the Chincoteague (sp?) island horses. There was an expectation of a wiped out herd but in the end only a few head perished.

I sometimes wonder about the testing method. As I understand it the test looks for antibodies in the horse rather than the virus itself. If that is the case, does it mean in each and every instance a horse is carrying the antibody also carries the virus (and thus capable of passing it on) or does it mean a horse has been exposed but does not actually have the disease (similar to being vaccinated for west nile, for example - you would see the antibodies obviously but the virus is not present)?
I'm wondering the same thing. As far as I know none of the horses in that herd ever got sick.
     
    07-18-2013, 09:10 AM
  #20
Super Moderator
It is confirmed that the Chinese have actually created a vaccine that works on EIA but as its a 'live vaccine' the US have concerns that it could actually spread the disease or a mutated form of it so are currently not allowing it into the country.
Large outbreaks like this one could do something to pressure increased research on producing something acceptable. These things can only be taken up by the big Pharma companies as they cost millions from start to end and sadly they will only do it if they see a justifiable profit
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