Fatigue signs
 
 

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Fatigue signs

This is a discussion on Fatigue signs within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • the signs of a young horse getting overheated acts real tired
  • Signs of horses not taken care of?

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    04-17-2012, 01:32 PM
  #1
Foal
Fatigue signs

Hey board.

I've been reading this board for a while and finally decided to sign up.
I'm new to horse riding, actually just made my first ride some six months ago, thanks to my sister. I'm thinking of joining this club and practice more but I'm worried about how horses are treated and does everyone give them the affection they need ? Last time I went with my sister I saw people jumping on horses back like they jumped on a motorbike I guess the question I'm trying to ask is can you have a real relation to horses, do they recognize you, and how do you know when a horse is tired and you gotta give him some rest ?

Thanks in advance
     
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    04-17-2012, 10:15 PM
  #2
Foal
Horses can definitely recognize a person and remember who treated them well. I've had my horse for 14 years and we have a very strong bond. He recognizes me and usually will come when he's called, but sometimes he just would rather continue eating :)

As far as signs of fatigue it really depends on the horse. Some horses are more laid back and will seem more tired than a more spirited breed of horse. Some signs of fatigue can be hanging their head, not wanting to move forward, falling asleep. I haven't boarded at a barn with lesson horses for many years, but it can be a concern that the horses are being used too much and/or not being cared for properly. There are also a lot of excellent barns that have people that are genuinely concerned with the care of the horses and I remember being a horse crazy teenager spending hours at the barn grooming the lesson horses. I hope you decide to give the club a try. I'm sure the horses would appreciate having a rider that's concerned with how they're feeling.
94broncoxlt likes this.
     
    04-18-2012, 01:18 AM
  #3
Foal
You have to know the horse. A reputable club/barn will not overwork their horses. Actually, they may have older lesson horses that are slow and cranky, but it is a disadvantage for club/barn owners to overwork their horses - because they will make less money off that horse in the long run. If you were getting into horse racing, THAT would be a place where you would see truly overworked horses. Please remember that horses have gone thousands of years working for and with humans, there is a difference in a tired school horse that is capable and not mistreated...and a horse that has been run into the ground. Some horses will go go go until it seems they will keel over, and some act like riding for 10 minutes is too much. It depends on the breed, riding, personality, physical capabilites, etc. Try the club! If you despise it, try a different barn!
     
    04-18-2012, 05:27 AM
  #4
Started
In addition to the other two posts, please remember that horses aren't like a house pet. They don't need as much affection as most think. Them being so large is another reason they must respect you.
     
    04-18-2012, 06:25 AM
  #5
Yearling
Horses don't need affection as we know it but more they need to be treated kindly and with respect. Of course, those of us bitten by the terminal horse bug will show affection but a scratch on the neck or a nice face rub is probably appreciated more by the horse than a kiss on the nose :) After all, that is how momma horse shows her "affection" to her baby...by nuzzling and rubbing. Has been pointed out, horses do learn to recognize people and they have their favorites :) One horse I leased about 15 years or so back had been a well loved mare for a few years before her young teenage owner got interested in boys; the mare was neglected in that manner though the general maintenance for full board left a lot to be desired. When I found this mare she was 200 pounds underweight and the only word I can call it is depressed..she had no interest in people or the goings on in the barn. A month of daily visits had her perking her ears and calling when she heard my car pull up; it took three months to get the weight back on her (self-care barn so she was on MY feeding program :) ). When her "owner" visited, which was only three times in the year I had her, the mare would tolerate the girl but there was no bond.

People who do what you are describing, just hop on like they would on a motorbike, don't have and will never have, the bond that can develop between a horse and rider..they ride..but they aren't "riders". That is up to the club/barn management to take them aside and let them know about some basic etiquette when it comes to the horses.

At the barn I ride at, this is paramount. Potential boarders are interviewed and screened to make sure they will be a positive addition to the barn...not everyone that has requested to board has been accepted, even if there a bunch of stalls open. Some of it is financial related, past issues with paying board, however, in many cases, it was attitude and general lack of respect that denied them a stall. All of the boarders and people who take lessons know what is expected in regards to caring for the horses on property and the manager and staff are all very careful to keep an eye on the school horses to make sure they are comfortable and healthy. If there is any doubt, any horse at any point in time may be removed from lessons until such a time as they are vet cleared to return to work. Several of the school horses are in their early to mid-20s and are only used in leadline classes.

One major thing I do when moving barns (I was active military so did quite a bit of moving) is I walk into the barns and take a deep breath. It may sound strange but if my eyes start to water from the reek of poorly cleaned stalls, I walk back out and don't return. This is the most basic of care. If the barn staff/manager won't clean the stalls properly, chances are the horses are not being looked after properly either. Caveat..there is a difference between the normal stall cleanliness when horses are in and out. Stalls cleaned regularly, ie daily, may have manure or have a wet spot but they don't reek. What I am referring to are stalls that are cleaned, maybe, every few days and horses are standing in wet and/or manure piled stalls.
     
    04-19-2012, 07:55 PM
  #6
Foal
Ho my god, so many answers ! Thanks to all of you for these long messages

I'm happy to hear horses all have a different way to express the fact they are running out of energy. Then I guess I'll have to ask for riding always the same horse so I'll know how to please him and not push him when he feels down. One could argue an absolute beginner like me will be given different horses on first lessons, but now that you guys told me respectable barns are well aware of how to maintain horses well being I won't be worry that much about it. Ok I'll try that club.

Few things I need to clear out though :

@Jumanji321,

You said :

"They don't need as much affection as most think. Them being so large is another reason they must respect you."

Does that mean you also have to be authoritative to them time to time so they don't go play around when you need them ?

@tlkng1

You said :

"A month of daily visits had her perking her ears and calling when she heard my car pull up"

By calling do you mean she was making sounds like scraping the floor or neighing ? Good job and helping that mare.

Thank you very much guys for your replies, the hourse community sounds like people with a passion.
     
    04-19-2012, 08:08 PM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by elumar    
Ho my god, so many answers ! Thanks to all of you for these long messages

@tlkng1

You said :

"A month of daily visits had her perking her ears and calling when she heard my car pull up"

By calling do you mean she was making sounds like scraping the floor or neighing ? Good job and helping that mare.

.
She would whinny, paw at the floor, stick her head out of her stall and watch me as I walked down the aisle..her stall was the third one down so she was close to the barn door. Of course, I helped all this "affection" by always having a gummy bear at the ready..she loved the things :)
     
    04-20-2012, 05:19 AM
  #8
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by elumar    

Few things I need to clear out though :

@Jumanji321,

You said :

"They don't need as much affection as most think. Them being so large is another reason they must respect you."

Does that mean you also have to be authoritative to them time to time so they don't go play around when you need them ?
Yes that is what I mean. Horses must respect you and any misbegaviour must be corrected as many small habits, can become serious and dangerous habits if they are not taken care of.
     
    04-20-2012, 07:11 AM
  #9
Showing
Welcome to the forum!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jumanji321    
Horses must respect you and any misbegaviour must be corrected as many small habits, can become serious and dangerous habits if they are not taken care of.
ANY sign of disrespect from your horse must be handled immediately - within seconds - each and every time, without exception. Once a horse learns (and they will) that they can get away with something, it will escalate.

There is an old saying that says Any time you are in contact with a horse, you are training him.

Not all horses will show signs of pleasure when you are near them, so don't be disappointed if a horse doesn't paw or neigh when they see you. Like humans, each horse will show emotions differently. I have one mare that I've been riding for some time and she is not a "people horse". She will tolerate you if she likes you but will walk away from you if she doesn't. I just got another horse will wants to be everyone's best friend and acts more like a Labrador Retriever. Just different personalities.
     
    04-25-2012, 07:06 AM
  #10
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by iridehorses    
ANY sign of disrespect from your horse must be handled immediately - within seconds - each and every time, without exception. Once a horse learns (and they will) that they can get away with something, it will escalate.
Hi and thanks for your answer however I would like to ask : To handle any signs of disrespect from the horse, is it ok to raise your voice or do you just have to pull on the briddle ? Is there a danger the horse gets affraid of you ?
     

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