Foal Help...
 
 

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Foal Help...

This is a discussion on Foal Help... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Vaccination and worming schedule for 6 month old colt
  • Praziquantil for colts

 
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    01-05-2010, 09:35 PM
  #1
Weanling
Foal Help...

My colt needs his first set of shots (he is 6 months old), I will be calling the vet monday but was wondering what I should ask for/expect?

Also, I KNOW the little guy needs to be dewormed big time (I will also talk to the vet), what dewormer and schedule do you recomend to help him get rid of everything safely and properly?

He also needs a coggins and if I decide to move him to a new barn I'd like to have the deworming started/finished (If we move we will be moving March 1st) before he is stressed even more! (potential barn owner knows about the worming concerns though incase it takes longer than a month to get him healthy)

Thanks in advance!
     
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    01-05-2010, 09:55 PM
  #2
Foal
When you call the vet tell them that you have a colt that needs his first shots and that he needs to be wormed. Usually older horses can be on a couple of different schedules. Most are on a paste which is every 3 months which works pretty good you just need to make sure that you change brands every time so that they don't get used to it. Colts can also be different but most that I have dealt with is once every month then on a regular schedule after that. It is kinda up to you what is easiest and works best for the barn that you move him to. With him being a colt if you are going to have him gelded know would be the perfect time. Remember that once gelded they are still fertile for 30 days after. Some barns have to make special arrangments for colts. GOOD LUCK.
     
    01-05-2010, 10:44 PM
  #3
Yearling
Yep, tell your vet that you have a 6 month old colt that needs to be vaccinated. He will likely ask you about whether or not your mare was vaccinated while pregnant. Likely he will recommend EEE, WEE, WNV, Tetanus, Strangles, Influenza, EHV and Rabies. Boosters will need to be given in about a month too. Then vaccinations again at 1 year of age.

Deworming should have been started on this guy months ago. Your vet will likely again ask about what kind of deworming program your mare is on and what kind of situation the foal is in. But it's likely that he will recommend a monthly or every other month deworming program until your colt is 1 year of age. But be sure to ask him about the parasite resistance issues with fenbendazole, pyrantel and ivermectin to ensure that you are not missing either ascarids or strongyles. Ascarids are showing resistance to both pyrantel and ivermectin and strongyles are resistant to fenbendazole in 90+% of the areas tested in the US (and the world) and to pyrantel in about 50% of areas tested.

Once your colt is over 1 year of age, you need to assess the situation via reviewing management practices at the stable where you keep him and have a fecal egg count performed well after the spring deworming to see what kind of parasite egg shedding he does. Based on that information, you and your vet can plan an appropriate deworming program.

Between now and then I would highly recommend that you read the articles archives on www.thehorse.com about parasites and deworming and then watch the webinar with the newest deworming recommendations that was posted in June 2009. The old every 2-3 months rotating dewormers is no longer recommended by the people who specialize in studying GI parasites of horses. That type of deworming program isn't effective any longer and will only lead to heavier parasite burdens and faster development of resistance to all the deworming drugs.
     
    01-06-2010, 07:51 AM
  #4
Weanling
Thanks!

Heres hoping we can see the vet ASAP .
     
    01-06-2010, 07:54 AM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jesredneck98    
Remember that once gelded they are still fertile for 30 days after. Some barns have to make special arrangments for colts. GOOD LUCK.
Yep, thanks.

If I move barns there is a colt the same age that (with a little luck) they get along and they can live together outside most of the time! (he also will be a gelding) Plus, the barn owner has expereince with colts and stallions and the whole gelding process so I'm sure she will be a HUGE help when the time comes!
     
    01-06-2010, 09:51 AM
  #6
mls
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryle    
Between now and then I would highly recommend that you read the articles archives on www.thehorse.com about parasites and deworming and then watch the webinar with the newest deworming recommendations that was posted in June 2009. The old every 2-3 months rotating dewormers is no longer recommended by the people who specialize in studying GI parasites of horses. That type of deworming program isn't effective any longer and will only lead to heavier parasite burdens and faster development of resistance to all the deworming drugs.
100% dependent on what the fecal count shows. For horses that shed over 500 or are in high risk situations, it is still recommended to perform a more frequent rotational worming.

I just dug out my issue of 06/09 Stable Managment this morning to show to a new boarder.
     
    01-06-2010, 10:05 AM
  #7
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
100% dependent on what the fecal count shows. For horses that shed over 500 or are in high risk situations, it is still recommended to perform a more frequent rotational worming.

I just dug out my issue of 06/09 Stable Managment this morning to show to a new boarder.
Yes, it is dependant on the fecal egg count, they do still recommend more frequent deworming for heavy shedders but not the "just do it very 2 months" program. The experts recommend 4 times a year in that situation focusing on the time of year when you have moderate weather and still discontinuing the dewormings when you have extremes of temperature. (For the south that means not deworming during the summer and for the north that means not deworming during the winter.) And being sure that you are deworming at appropriate time based upon the activity of the last drug used. For example, you would deworm in spring with moxidectin/praziquantel. Then in 3 months with pyrantel. Then a month later with ivermectin and again 2 months later with ivermectin/praziquantel for your final deworming before the weather conditions become too extreme for parasite reinfection rates to be a problem.

In these high shedding horses you don't want to use moxidectin and then deworm again in 8 weeks with fenbendazole or pyrantel becuase you aren't going to be doing anything. And you don't want to wait a full 8 weeks after using either fenbendazole or pyrantel because that is going to leave this horse shedding eggs for a full month before you deworm again, thus continuing the cycle of contamination for pastures.

The "just deworm every 2-3 months rotating dewormers" simply isn't a good way to do it. The plan needs to take into account weather, pasture/stable management, the horse's own resistance to parasites and the way that each drug works.

This is per the experts in the field of equine parasitology. I wrote a veterinary medical assoc. Approved article on this topic this past summer. ;)
     
    01-06-2010, 10:10 AM
  #8
Started
My vet only gave my little guy three way, botulism and influenza, he's getting three installments over three months. He started at 10 months.

He got wormed around the time he was weaned. When I got him we gave him a deworming treatment, as the vet thought he had worms. Since, he just gets the regular rotation with my mare. He'll be a year in March. I just got an egg count, and it looks like he will need to be dewormed 2-4x a year, and get regular retesting.
     
    01-06-2010, 10:33 AM
  #9
Weanling
Thank you Ryle.

This is very good information. I'd like to trust my vet 100% and go with what they tell me but I found it never hurts to be well informed; there is so much new and updated information to learn and study. I like to know the what and why plus understand exactly what my vet is talking about.

Thanks again for the information.

The vet I am using is a Quakertown Veterinary Clinic here in Pa. They are also the big-name horse emergency hospital for horses in the area as well as the routine care so I hope they will guide me in the right direction!
     
    01-06-2010, 10:40 AM
  #10
Started
Im not a big fan of quakertown, for various reasons.
I use Blauner for emergencies and diagnosis, and Seybolt for shots and routine stuff.
     

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