founder?Q help a little worryed
 
 

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founder?Q help a little worryed

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  • What horse breeds are more resistant to ems
  • Main horse breeds prone to founder

 
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    04-22-2009, 12:27 AM
  #1
Banned
Question founder?Q help a little worryed

Hi, I have a mare and she has a crest but some one told me that it means she'll founder is this true? I know some horses that r fat and have one but hers seems to be muscle and she is strong and quiet fit, she could tone up a little but its just that she was so fat and I've got her into shape. Is it just her shape cause she is a bit bulky like a QH but even more or could she get founder? Please help Ireland heres a pic might help she has lost weight since heaps of weight.
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    04-22-2009, 05:47 AM
  #2
Weanling
She is heavy. I can't see her crest too well because of her mane. A heavy crest means a horse has a higher chance of foundering.

You can see some fat pads forming on her shoulder etc.

Remember to take weight off slowly and make all feed changes slowly. If she's on grain I would back that way down.

Also if you start working her again start slow. Like humans they have to work up to it if they have been idle
     
    04-22-2009, 06:08 AM
  #3
Weanling
What breed is she? That can make a difference as some breeds are more prone to this type of founder. They usually distribute the fat in particular areas like the crest.

She doesn't look the typical candiate. Not to say that she won't. But getting some weight off her would help like weefoal mentioned.

Here is a good article about EMS. The website is a great source on health information.

The Horse: Managing the Easy Keeper
     
    04-22-2009, 08:22 AM
  #4
Yearling
I'd be more concerned with Cushings with a fatter horse than founder.
     
    04-22-2009, 10:38 AM
  #5
Showing
Almost all of my horses have crests (have had for years) and I have never had an issue with founder. I think it is more important what type of food you are feeding. Keep a close eye that you are not overdosing her with high sugar content foods like grain and don't let her go overboard on fresh grass. Also, watch her carb intake. My horses get no grain at all, only a mix of grass hay and alfalfa (they self moderate as they have constant access to feed).
     
    04-22-2009, 09:40 PM
  #6
Trained
In this pic, I would say she is well overweight also. Do you have a more recent picture? I have never heard of a crest = founder. I agree with wee-foal -- get rid of or drastically reduce any grain if she's getting any and keep her working. If you're concerned about founder, keep an eye on her feet -- get to know her regular body controls -- heat at coronary band, digital pulse, regular pulse, colour of her gums, breathing rate. And keep her feet up to date.
     
    04-23-2009, 05:03 AM
  #7
Banned
As I said she has lost so much weight since then and she's pretty fit I'll try find a better pic and she doesn't get fed any more cause we have so much grass but use cell grazing to stop over eating
     
    04-23-2009, 05:03 AM
  #8
Banned
It's just the crest is the same
     
    04-23-2009, 06:57 AM
  #9
Started
if the crest is not leaving I would think IR. Remove all grain products from her diet and offer a good vitamin/mineral supplement or rationbalancer in it's place..

what is her diet like now??
     
    04-23-2009, 06:35 PM
  #10
Weanling
EMS (Equine Metabolic Syndrome) associates a crest with founder. It is real similar to cushings. My friend had a morgan that would founder every year because of this and she was practically starving him trying to get weight off. They get resistant to insulin.


EMS is defined as a condition of: 1) obesity and/or patchy fat accumulation (crest), 2) insulin resistance, and 3) chronic laminitis in middle-aged horses (8- to 18-years-old).

Breeds especially prone to EMS include:
  • Morgans;
  • Saddlebreds;
  • Paso Finos;
  • Peruvian Pasos;
  • domesticated Spanish Mustangs;
  • certain warmblood lines;
  • some pony breeds.
Here is another article on it
http://www.thehorse.com/pdf/factshee...resistance.pdf
     

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