Foundering/Cushings
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Foundering/Cushings

This is a discussion on Foundering/Cushings within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Equine cushings chat room
  • Ration balancer for cushings

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    07-20-2011, 12:01 PM
  #1
Yearling
Unhappy Foundering/Cushings

Farrier came out about two weeks ago and Rosie has been lame since. Called a vet out and she has foundered, possibly as a result of Cushings :(. She has been gaining weight because we have to feed her when we feed Paradise but she hasn't been being worked daily even though she eats grain daily. Does anyone have information on Cushings? I am doing a thorough search of the web but I thought people on here would have some info too. I researched it a couple of months ago when I though Jake could have it but I really only remember the symptoms. Thank you anyone who can offer some insight!
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    07-20-2011, 04:00 PM
  #2
Foal
Some of the symptoms: heavy, thick, and/or wavy hair in the winter and the horse will have trouble shedding it in the summer, easy keeper, laminitis (and founder I'm guessing). Some horses are said to suffer from respiratory disease, skin infections, parasite infections, foot abscesses, mouth ulcers, and periodontal or dental disease because of Cushing's.

My old horse had Cushing's disease and he always became like a wavy Wooly mammoth in the winter. Thankfully, he wasn't an easy keeper and we never had lameness issues with him.

And I'm 99.99% sure that Cushing's disease cannot be cured.
     
    07-20-2011, 04:04 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Did the vet suggest doing the ACTH blood test for cushings? If he didn't, you need to ask him to do that before the horse starts "gathering" her winter coat and storing winter fat.

Don't let him do the Dex test (dexamethasone), because it can bring on founder in some horses.

Did the vet suggest a feed plan? I'm not surprised if he/she didn't. While some vets are up-to-speed on cushings and metabolic issues, most are not.

Sooooo get that horse OFF grain five minutes ago. Put a grazing muzzle on her to send her out to pasture, or dry lot her with measured amounts of hay.

By measured, I mean on a scale. She should be fed 1.5% - 2% of her DESIRED body weight, not her current weight.

Some bagged feeds are good for these types horses, most are not. Triple Crown Lite is the best by far, if you have access to Triple Crown.

Otherwise a good quality ration balancer would work.

Cushings affects the pituitary gland, which is why you might see the term PPID used; that stands for Pituitary Pars Intermedia Disfunction.

Pergolide works on these cushings horses but it is not recommended if the horse has metabolic issues such as insulin resistance or equine metabolic syndrome.

A separate blood test to determine insulin level would settle that question.

A horse CAN INDEED, be both cushings and insulin resistant and in that case Pergolide is still needed. My friend's 22 yo Paso Fino is cushings and IR and he is on .5 mg of Pergolide but the dosage needs upped.

I have two horses formally diagnosed as insulin resistant. These are the reasons why I know this much and believe me, I wish I didn't.

It is also critical to know the sugar/starch value in your hay. If you can't store up a lot of hay and buy from different sources, instead of sending it out for testing, just know that you have to cold-soak all the hay this horse eats for 30 minutes minimum forever after.

If the horse does start to get the Yak-looking coat, it will have to be body clipped. My friend is up to clipping her Paso twice during the warm months and he grows that hair back faster with each passing year.

In summary:

1. NO GRAIN
2. Put on a high quality bagged feed for these types horses or a ration balancer. I would prefer a ration balancer that is vit/min fortified.
3. Grazing muzzle for turnout or put in a dry lot with weight-measured hay (that would be dry before you soak it).
3.1 If dry-lotted, scatter the hay around so she has to move because she needs exercise.

This Southern States link talks about feeding insulin resistant horses, but it's the same game plan for a cushings horse.

Feeding the Insulin Resistant Horse - Southern States

Cushings/founder is really serious business. I hope your vet was a lot more concerned that what you saying because I would like to take him/her to the Woodshed for a Come-to-Jesus-Meeting, if he isn't.

I don't mean that against anything you said but I am curious just how concerned (or not) the vet seemed to be.
     
    07-20-2011, 04:09 PM
  #4
Green Broke
Cushings can not be cured. It is progressive, but when caught early enough, it can be managed for usually a reasonably long life span with medication (your vet should be able to prescribe what is needed) and CAREFUL diet management. Feeding her out of convenience due to who she is pastured with must absolutely go out the window. You will need to carefully monitor all her intake.

Some of the meds are on the pricey end, but do make a very big difference. Just be aware that going forward, caring for a cushing's horse means a complete lifestyle change in how you care for your horses, you will have to be much more vigilant, and much more careful.

Good luck with her, and so sorry about the Dx.

ETA, Walkinthewalk posted while I was still typing, but she provides excellent information, listen to her! :)
     
    07-21-2011, 10:46 AM
  #5
Banned
I agree.....no grain.

With metabolic disorders like cushing's disease, you really need to sit down with your vet and come up with a strict feeding plan. It is not something you should do on your own, nor do a trial and error feeding plan ..... With a Cushing's horse, their feeding regimen leaves very very little room for error....
     
    07-21-2011, 03:07 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beauseant    
I agree.....no grain.

With metabolic disorders like cushing's disease, you really need to sit down with your vet and come up with a strict feeding plan. It is not something you should do on your own, nor do a trial and error feeding plan ..... With a Cushing's horse, their feeding regimen leaves very very little room for error....
Or, if your vet is of no help, like mine was four years ago, consult a degreed equine nutritionist - one that hangs out at a university in your area.

All my vet and the vet in the next county said was "watch what he eats" but couldn't tell me what that should be

Were it not for two, degreed, equine nutritionists helping me devise a diet, I would have been in big trouble and my horse in bigger trouble.

A new vet has since come into my county and thankfully is much more up-to-speed on metabolic issues.
     
    07-21-2011, 04:45 PM
  #7
Foal
My neighbors 20 plus old mare had cushings and was foundered...he knew she was foundered but had no idea what cushings was (still feeding sweet feed etc). So after much reading, switched to pretty much no grain other than a small pellet version (purina makes one now for cushings/IR horses also), and started ensuring she only had access to grazing during the day, and put her up in the evening (prior to that 24/7 grazing) which was a major portion of the problem. ALso put her on 2 tsps of chasteberry (natural supplement/inexpensive) and it was amazing just what doing that did for her. The only reason he gave her some grain was to mix the chasteberry with it.
     
    07-21-2011, 07:48 PM
  #8
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by hhadavis    
ALso put her on 2 tsps of chasteberry (natural supplement/inexpensive) and it was amazing just what doing that did for her. The only reason he gave her some grain was to mix the chasteberry with it.
Don't be afraid to up the chasteberry. I have been feeding it to my senior IR horse (23-1/2 now) for four years

He weighs 1,000 lbs and gets 1/8th measuring cup twice daily during green grass season.

When winter gets here I cut it back to 1/8th cup daily.
     
    07-22-2011, 01:45 AM
  #9
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by walkinthewalk    
.

All my vet and the vet in the next county said was "watch what he eats" but couldn't tell me what that should be

Ummm...you're kidding, right?

That is downright scary. My vet is not held in high esteem by me at this moment.....but that is cause she said Epona was fat. Lol Luckily she does get her point across ..... a statement like your vets above said leaves an awful lot of room for translation.
     
    07-22-2011, 03:42 AM
  #10
Foal
[QUOTE=walkinthewalk;1104907]

In summary:

1. NO GRAIN
2. Put on a high quality bagged feed for these types horses or a ration balancer. I would prefer a ration balancer that is vit/min fortified.
3. Grazing muzzle for turnout or put in a dry lot with weight-measured hay (that would be dry before you soak it).
3.1 If dry-lotted, scatter the hay around so she has to move because she needs exercise.

This Southern States link talks about feeding insulin resistant horses, but it's the same game plan for a cushings horse.

Feeding the Insulin Resistant Horse - Southern States


I must respectfully disagree, cushings horses do not follow the same game plan as insulin resistant horses. My horse has been diagnosed with and treated for cushings for the last 7 years. He gets grain every day, in fact he is given cob and a mix of equine senior. He is also fed ten lbs of alfalfa hay twice a day. This would probably do great harm to a truly metabolic horse, however cushings is in a sense a whole different animal. The best plan for you would probably to have some tests done perhaps by a vet who is well read in the syndrome. They can give you a much better feel for the correct feeding plan.
It is of upmost importance that your horse is diagnosed with the correct disorder, cushings is no joke and your horse should be treated right away, my horse has been on Pergolide for 7 years, he is now 28 and has never looked better, no joke people can't even fathom he is as old as he is. I have also seen metabolic horses be prescribed this drug, and it was very effective.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Is there a good supplement for foundering? beau159 Horse Health 8 10-18-2010 09:41 PM
How to keep your horse from foundering Alicia Horse Health 5 10-28-2009 01:58 AM
Foundering HELP!!! i've never dealt with it before :S HollyBubbles Horse Health 4 08-09-2009 04:23 AM
Update on foundering horse! horses_r_life9 Horse Health 3 11-07-2008 06:47 AM
Foundering horse PLZ READ horses_r_life9 Horse Health 22 08-27-2008 01:17 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0