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Free to eat muzzle.. [cribbing]

This is a discussion on Free to eat muzzle.. [cribbing] within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • How to make a grazing muzzle out of baler twine
  • Why horse prefers hay over grass

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    11-09-2012, 05:16 PM
  #11
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsonsky    
i'm confused - did you buy it or no? Was it effective or no?
I bought it, but I haven't used it yet. There were lots of good reviews on it, but it was a bit too big for her throat latch.
     
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    11-09-2012, 05:40 PM
  #12
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jore    
I think it's mainly because she likes to crib while she eats.. however, in her stall, she doesn't have to worry about the other mares. Outside, she's usually lucky to be permitted near the hay. She really is at the bottom of the totem pole, so she's often told off. When she's inside her stall, we usually put it to the farthest corner so that it wouldn't be as convenient for her to walk over to her stall gate and crib.

However, with the hay feeder.. it's right there for her to crib on, whether she's eating the hay or not. Apparently all she does is crib all day on it, and never really ventures off.
There you have the reason. She is stressing because she cannot eat when she wants to.
Relieve the stress and she will stop cribbing. As easy as that.
One way to do that is make more hay available at different places, as far apart from each other as possible. Haynets come to mind. That might also help solve her weight problem.
I made a bunch of haynets out of baling twine. Not too big, for about 5 lbs of hay. Depending on how many horses share her pasture, some of these would solve more than just a cribbing problem. Ulcers, due to stress and not enough hay, is one.
Muzzles, cribbing straps and such don't solve the problem. Just make for some very PO'd horses......
     
    11-09-2012, 06:27 PM
  #13
Yearling
I'll suggest that to my instructor. It makes sense.. hopefully it'll work. She doesn't go anywhere else to crib besides that hay feeder so if she has piles of hay away from it, maybe that'll stop it, for the most part.
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    11-09-2012, 06:33 PM
  #14
Green Broke
There you go
I've known several TB cribbers who all stopped when kept as a normal horse, not a racing machine. Only one never recuperated...she was kept on little hay inside and none whatsoever in her drylot she spent the days in. Even after I convinced the owner to give hay, she never stopped. She looked and felt horrible. And we don't want that to happen with your Indie, right
     
    11-09-2012, 06:42 PM
  #15
Yearling
The one thing that confuses me is that she could easily just go eat grass but chooses not to half the time. I'll see if Laura will lay out a few piles of hay fof her, and no, not at all!
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    11-09-2012, 06:49 PM
  #16
Green Broke
Hay keeps her warm....their instincts tell them what to do. I've seen that a lot that horses prefer hay over grass.
     
    11-09-2012, 07:46 PM
  #17
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
There you go
I've known several TB cribbers who all stopped when kept as a normal horse, not a racing machine. Only one never recuperated...she was kept on little hay inside and none whatsoever in her drylot she spent the days in. Even after I convinced the owner to give hay, she never stopped. She looked and felt horrible. And we don't want that to happen with your Indie, right
i WISH that would work for my horse. Even with hay in front of him 24/7 he would crib. I'm moving him to a barn with actual grass pastures at the end of the month in the hopes that this will help more. But regardless, i'm 99% certain he'll try to crib when he comes into the barn at night. He's 17 so I don't know that he'll ever actually stop. :/
     
    11-09-2012, 08:00 PM
  #18
Yearling
Makes sense, thank you! Fingers crossed that it works!
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    11-09-2012, 11:22 PM
  #19
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsonsky    
i WISH that would work for my horse. Even with hay in front of him 24/7 he would crib. I'm moving him to a barn with actual grass pastures at the end of the month in the hopes that this will help more. But regardless, i'm 99% certain he'll try to crib when he comes into the barn at night. He's 17 so I don't know that he'll ever actually stop. :/
unfortunately I think you're right. Maybe if he could live in a herd, out 24/7, fixed herd structure......maybe........
     
    11-10-2012, 12:26 AM
  #20
Green Broke
I have both the Miracle and Dare collars for my horse. The Miracle collar would stop him, but it had to be so tight on him that it was leaving rubs even with the fleece covers; it also stretched out quite a bit over time and I had to keep moving to higher holes (which really confused some of the barn staff who didn't know which marking to use).

I originally got the Dare collar thinking I would swap between the two collars to keep any rubs from getting bad, but I haven't used the Miracle since I first swapped. The Dare hasn't left any rubs at all, and is easier to put on/off. I could leave it pretty loose at first, but then he figured out he could still crib if he tried hard enough. It probably also stretched a little, though not nearly as noticeably as the Miracle. Overall, I like it a lot more, and it's effective for my horse. Since you've already got it, you might as well give it a try.

If he's choosing to crib over eating, or cribs a lot while he's eating, it's a pretty sure sign of ulcers. I think I've already seen you post about that before (?) so I won't give you the rant on that

Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsonsky    
i'm moving to a new barn and they are concerned (even though it's been proven otherwise) that the horses in the barn with him will learn to crib from seeing him do it
It's pretty hard to convince people otherwise. One of the trainers at my barn has a TB mare who's 2 stalls down from a pony that cribs. Her horse recently found that she could pull on a loose piece of her feed tub and make a lot of noise; not cribbing, just playing with something with her mouth that makes a loud obnoxious sound. I overheard the trainer say that her horse better not be learning how to crib from the pony- mind you, her mare can't even see the pony, so she'd have to learn just by hearing him grunt. When I commented that studies haven't shown any evidence that horses learn to crib from observing other horses do it, she just dismissed it because I have a horse who cribs, and therefore I must be biased. It couldn't possibly be that I have a horse that cribs and therefore have a personal reason to really look into the latest research on causes, prevention and management of cribbers
     

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