Frog Question
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Frog Question

This is a discussion on Frog Question within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Crooked frog
  • Frog on horse off center

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    04-18-2010, 08:13 PM
  #1
Yearling
Question Frog Question

Hi everyone!

I'm leasing a WONDERFUL little horse who's feet have been sorely neglected for a very long time.

What I was told was that he had a really awful shoeing job and then was switched to be barefoot with a new farrier. Unfortunately after that he got off schedule because no one wanted to pay for the farrier to come out and so his feet became very over grown.

They were trimmed about two weeks ago and he was VERY sore after wards, to the point of obviously limping. Today it was brought to my attention that he was acting lame and shouldn't be doing ground work.

I took a picture of his worst foot with an off-center frog. Called the vet and am waiting for a response and appointment but I wanted to get some opinions and advice while I wait.

I was told it was so bad that he shouldn't be let out of his stall to do so much as light ground work in a round pen. I'm going to do what the vet suggests but at the same time I want to be prepared with more opinions and the right questions to ask.

I hope this rambling makes sense, thank you so much for your time!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg back_right.jpg (47.0 KB, 142 views)
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    04-18-2010, 09:42 PM
  #2
Trained
OK, I'm not an expert; I do have some experience in this though. What I see is a lot of excess sole and trimming needed on the frog. As well, the heels seem high. On the face of it, none of this, in my opinion, would actually make him lame, but he may well have thrush hiding deep within which could be causing trouble. I think in general those feet need to be opened up. It actually looks like the sole has grown in to compensate for something, but maybe it's just still overgrowth that wasn't looked after.

To be expected that he would be sore if his feet were neglected for so long. Hard to say for sure though, since we can't see what his feet were like before. It would be nice if your trimmer was close by and could come every week for two or three weeks to take just a bit at a time. A horse should feel better after a trim, not worse. Subject to just simple tenderness that should go away in a day when in pasture only. Use boots for rough ground if needed.

Even this pic doesn't tell the whole story. Side, front, back and general confirmation give more infro.

And, welcome to the forum!
     
    04-18-2010, 09:54 PM
  #3
Yearling
Thank you SO much for responding!

I'll take some more photos when I am out next.

I have conflicting opinions given to me, one of which being that he is in desperate need of a new farrier and that they are making a mess of his feet.

It's hard for me to tell as I've only just recently begun leasing him and haven't seen the "progression" either.

It was explained to me that because the frog was offcenter he was walking as though his feet were twisted and putting strain and pain on his tendons
     
    04-18-2010, 10:42 PM
  #4
Foal
Please don't get confused about the frog being off center.
The frog is always the center of the actual load bearing part of the horse's leg.
A perfect normal conformation horse will wear and have the same amount of hoof on both sides of the frog.
A horse with a conformation defualt will have uneven amount of hoof on either side of the frog thus making it appear as the frog not being in the center.
The frog is still the center of the load bearing for that limb that is where you need to trim the hoof and balance it according to the frog as much as possible.
Now don't think you have a bad or unusable horse because your horse's hoofs are not perfect get a good trimmer or farrier to trim those hoofs correctly and you will have a happy and sound horse.
I really hope you can understand what I was triing to explain here and good luck.
     
    04-18-2010, 10:46 PM
  #5
Yearling
Thanks so very very much!

I'm hoping that this opinion that was expressed today was misplaced or exaggerated but since I have no experience in the matter I really couldn't argue one way or the other.

He sure didn't look lame or in pain to me at all but her claim was that that right hind foot and the crooked frog was causing him severe discomfort and he should not leave the stall.

Here is hoping that this is a correctable or conformation issue rather than something that contributes to him being lame and unworkable.

I really appreciate all the opinions and feedback!
     
    04-19-2010, 08:57 PM
  #6
Trained
Don't worry about the "crooked" frog. If you provide more pics, we can give more insight.

Is he indeed lame or is someone just telling you that he must be lame because of how his feet look? Free turnout is good for hoof-health. Stall lock-up is not. The more movement of the horse, the more movement of the hoof: expansion, contraction, hinge, compression, release... all this means more blood going through. Is there any heat? Any throbbing, excess pulse? If you don't see or feel any lameness, then he isn't. Just because some human thinks "it looks funny, therefore he must be in pain" doesn't make it so.

Still, his feet are due for another trim, but work closely with your trimmer. Tell him/her that last time he was sore and ask for more input about it.
     

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
This frog lilianaliliana Horse Health 10 03-20-2010 12:51 AM
A 'White Puss In Frog' Question... Anon A Moss Horse Health 8 03-11-2010 04:16 PM
Cut in the frog? jemulchia Horse Health 3 09-20-2009 10:49 PM
Frog Swelling? xx chico Horse Health 1 03-31-2009 10:20 AM
Oversized frog CrufflerSteve Horse Health 1 04-14-2008 07:23 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0