Gelding decided to indulge in all you can eat buffet
   

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Gelding decided to indulge in all you can eat buffet

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    11-11-2012, 12:43 PM
  #1
Foal
Gelding decided to indulge in all you can eat buffet

I went out to the barn this morning and found my 28 year old gelding loose in the barn with his head buried in the grain barrel. I caught him and turned him back out and put out their hay. For 28 years old he is generally in really good health. I don't think he was loose for long since there wasnt any poop in the barn isle but I can't be for sure. If this causes problems what type of signs am I looking for to signal that I need to get a vet involved? Stomach kicking, rolling, laying down? Is there anything specific I can do to keep this from turning into an issue?


I think I'm going to buy pad locks and log chains for my feed barrel.....
     
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    11-11-2012, 12:44 PM
  #2
Green Broke
What kind of "grain" is it? How much do you estimate he ate - simple comparison of what was in it the last time you opened the bin to what is in there now?
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    11-11-2012, 12:46 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by themacpack    
What kind of "grain" is it? How much do you estimate he ate - simple comparison of what was in it the last time you opened the bin to what is in there now?

I'm sorry...I feed Purina Strategy..its a pelleted feed. I'm not sure how much he ate..a couple days worth Id say
     
    11-11-2012, 12:49 PM
  #4
Yearling
Make sure he gets lots of water, watch for colic for sure, and possibly founder. Maybe call your vet, just in case and ask their opinion, better to be safe than sorry.
     
    11-11-2012, 12:53 PM
  #5
Weanling
Yikes! That's a lot of grain for a short period of time. I would call your vet and let them know so they can advise you what to watch for or do.
     
    11-11-2012, 12:53 PM
  #6
Trained
" a couple of days worth" in my case would be 5 lbs, in other people's case it might be 16lbs....big difference!
No grain for today and only a handful tomorrow, exercise, if possible, and watch for signs if colic or laminitis. How is his condition, plump or rather lean?
     
    11-11-2012, 12:57 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
" a couple of days worth" in my case would be 5 lbs, in other people's case it might be 16lbs....big difference!
No grain for today and only a handful tomorrow, exercise, if possible, and watch for signs if colic or laminitis. How is his condition, plump or rather lean?
I would say he is about right at the moment. He was kind of chubby last spring and going into summer but we got him down some and he's looking good now. I would say he probably ate 3x what he would get in one feeding.

We didnt grain him today (for obvious reasons lol) As of yet, he isnt acting any different.
     
    11-11-2012, 01:09 PM
  #8
Trained
Good, a little less risk then. You can salt his hay to get him to drink more and maybe exercise him a bit.
I had a fellow boarder's horse get out and happily munch half a bag of Omolene......he was longed and just wouldn't quit running, which is not normal for him. He came out of it just fine.
Watch him today, maybe, as suggested, a "just in case" call to the vet for opinion might be a good idea.
     
    11-11-2012, 01:12 PM
  #9
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
Good, a little less risk then. You can salt his hay to get him to drink more and maybe exercise him a bit.
I had a fellow boarder's horse get out and happily munch half a bag of Omolene......he was longed and just wouldn't quit running, which is not normal for him. He came out of it just fine.
Watch him today, maybe, as suggested, a "just in case" call to the vet for opinion might be a good idea.
I will definitely. Keep an eye on him. If it had been my mare I don't think I would be as worried but I get pretty paranoid with cody just because of his age. We have only had him about three years but he's never given us any heath issues and is still in great shape considering that he is 28 years old now.
     
    11-11-2012, 01:39 PM
  #10
Showing
Truthfully, I would be much less concerned about colic than I would with founder. Just to be on the safe side, I would go ahead and get a vet involved. They will know how to spot the really early signs of colic or founder and the earlier you catch them, the earlier you can treat them and the less damage there ends up being done.

With a horse that age, one bad founder or colic could very well kill him.
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