Grazing muzzles- thoughts on them?? for or against? - Page 3 - The Horse Forum
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post #21 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by SAsamone View Post
saying it right now- worst thing I ever did for my horse. it was suggested to me because my horse windsucks- it didn't stop him, he was able to do it right through the maliable rubber/plastic, and because he was underweight it stopped him from getting the "grass and hay" he was supposed to be able to get. It also made him pout lol. He would just stand there, and he looked pathetic. I use the collar now. I guess if you had a really fat horse, it would be okay, but a hole the size of a quarter isn't going to allow grass through; the muzzle just forces the grass down. I think they are stupid and pointless.
I think your issue should be with the person who suggested the wrong equipment for the job, not the piece of equipment. (Or maybe you did not understand their recommendation correctly, there are other types of muzzles designed to reduce cribbing.)

Do you hate screwdrivers because they can not hammer in a nail effectively?

Grazing muzzles are not meant to help with cribbing. They are meant to reduce the amount of grass intake of a horse. They do that job quite well, so they are far from stupid and pointless.
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post #22 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:00 PM
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Reducing the grass intake a horse gets should not even be considered. If a horse gets fat on grass and stays fat, then don't feed it anything else. I stand by my opinion. However, I will agree with you that the person who suggested it to stop the cribbing was rediculous lol :)
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post #23 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:06 PM
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Sasamone- Some horses can't handle all the grass they eat. My mini will colic very easily if she has constant access to grass, so we only turn her out for short periods of time. Now I'm considering a grazing muzzle though, because I would like her to have 24/7 turnout instead of being cooped in her stall.
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post #24 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:07 PM
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Originally Posted by SAsamone View Post
Reducing the grass intake a horse gets should not even be considered. If a horse gets fat on grass and stays fat, then don't feed it anything else.
LOL!

What if they get VERY obese on grass and get nothing else?

Which if I had to guess, is the reason why most people use them.


I personally prefer my horses to not founder because they are too fat. Since I would rather they be able to walk around all day instead of being closed in a tiny area a grazing muzzle keeps their weight in check and allows them the ability to freely interact with the herd.
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post #25 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:10 PM
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Agreed. A horse who gorges on grass, especially when its high in sugars is at risk for founder. It also can cause obesity in horses. It is an essential tool for people who have lush pastures.
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post #26 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:11 PM
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I'm sorry- I have to disagree, and mabye it's just because of where I live. In Florida, we have grass year round- it gets no richer one season than the other. So having a horse founder or get obese on grass is just ludicrous. And if you are that worried about your horse, and don't want them to be in a stall, then build a seperate paddock filled with dirt, and put another horse in there. There are other ways around sticking a muzzle on a horse. Muzzles are for dogs. Not to mention the fact that having ANYTHING on a horse, even a halter, while they are free in a pasture is very dangerous. Many horses in my area, including one of my own, have gotten injured, sometimes seriously, by getting caught on fencing or whatnot. Sorry, but that's my opinion and the thread did ask 'for or against.' I, clearly, am against.

After-thought: If grass is so bad for horses, why is that their diet naturally???
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post #27 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:13 PM
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People do keep horses in other parts of the country/world than Florida, maybe you did not realize that.
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post #28 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:15 PM
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LMAO really!?!? thanks for that. I simply meant to imply that where I am from influences my opinion. You don't see them down here.
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post #29 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by SAsamone View Post
After-thought: If grass is so bad for horses, why is that their diet naturally???

It is true, based on my experience, that horses that are turned out 24/7 do have a metabolism suited for eating grass. I always have to put muzzles on weeks after the horses that are in stalls, I agree on that. But we do not keep horses in the "natural environment" anymore. They are not meant to be in a stall. They are meant to be constantly moving and grazing. Which is why we give them hay.

Also, a lot of owners will lime their fields making them full of nutrients. The grass they are eating now is not the same grass they were eating years and years ago.
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post #30 of 52 Old 06-28-2011, 02:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SAsamone View Post
saying it right now- worst thing I ever did for my horse. it was suggested to me because my horse windsucks- it didn't stop him, he was able to do it right through the maliable rubber/plastic, and because he was underweight it stopped him from getting the "grass and hay" he was supposed to be able to get. It also made him pout lol. He would just stand there, and he looked pathetic. I use the collar now. I guess if you had a really fat horse, it would be okay, but a hole the size of a quarter isn't going to allow grass through; the muzzle just forces the grass down. I think they are stupid and pointless.
Unfortunately I think you had a bad experience based on some pretty woeful advice someone gave you. Whoever suggested it as a cure for windsucking is not a person you should EVER consult for advice again.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SAsamone View Post
I'm sorry- I have to disagree, and mabye it's just because of where I live. In Florida, we have grass year round- it gets no richer one season than the other. So having a horse founder or get obese on grass is just ludicrous. And if you are that worried about your horse, and don't want them to be in a stall, then build a seperate paddock filled with dirt, and put another horse in there. There are other ways around sticking a muzzle on a horse. Muzzles are for dogs. Not to mention the fact that having ANYTHING on a horse, even a halter, while they are free in a pasture is very dangerous. Many horses in my area, including one of my own, have gotten injured, sometimes seriously, by getting caught on fencing or whatnot. Sorry, but that's my opinion and the thread did ask 'for or against.' I, clearly, am against.

After-thought: If grass is so bad for horses, why is that their diet naturally???
I had a horse I had to lock up in a small, dirt yard every spring time so I could strictly feed him low sugar/starch hay. If left on pasture alone at that time of year he would suffer acute laminitis. If I had have left him to graze without restricting his grass intake, it would have been the end of him.

Not pointing this out to make you feel silly, just to illustrate one example of how a grazing muzzle, if used correctly, can be a very good tool for managing a horse's diet.

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