Hanoverian and High ringbone
   

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Hanoverian and High ringbone

This is a discussion on Hanoverian and High ringbone within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Will horse with Ringbone pass vet

 
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    11-18-2013, 09:45 PM
  #1
Started
Hanoverian and High ringbone

Would you get a horse with mild high ringbone or pass and let what happens to him happen? He was free a few weeks ago on a fb group. The lady that got him for free said that he was sound and put him on another group for $8500. He was than traded to a lady for three horses and she knows his history and doesn't want to keep him. Has anyone dealt with a horse with mild ringbone? Is he worth getting for a trail horse or will I be throwing good money after bad?
     
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    11-18-2013, 09:56 PM
  #2
Banned
Why take on a horse with problems not worth it to many good ones without issues. I currently own a horse with hoof issues if someone was trying to give me, my current horse id pass on him.

Understand though I would NEVER get rid of him because of it iv owned him 10 years.
     
    11-18-2013, 10:10 PM
  #3
Foal
I have had 2 horses with ringbone. The first started out with a mild case. It is a progressive condition where the body continually lays down new calcium in an effort to increase the pastern bone density in reaction to stresses on the original bone. On an x-ray, it looks like the peaks in the meringue topping on lemon meringue pie. The tops of the peaks are sharp and as the tendon rubs over them with each step taken, it is like scraping over shards of glass.

In some cases if it involves the joint, eventually the joint can fuse and when that happens, most of the discomfort is relieved, however flexibility is also lost.

I used rounded shoes for easier/faster breakover but the horse was never completely sound. We went on many trail rides but had to mostly walk because it was painful to trot or canter more than a few steps at a time.

The first horse I had was my forever horse so I kept him until he passed on, but the second horse had it in all three pastern joints (P1, P2 and P3-coffin) so badly that I had to euthanize him. He was a Belgian/Qtr. Cross that matured out to have all Belgian body mass on Quarter horse legs, which were insufficient to support the weight.

It's not necessarily a death sentence and there is a wide range of degrees of severity so your experience may end up anywhere along the scale.

Best of luck in your decision.
     
    11-18-2013, 10:12 PM
  #4
Foal
I have had 2 horses with ringbone. The first started out with a mild case. It is a progressive condition where the body continually lays down new calcium in an effort to increase the pastern bone density in reaction to stresses on the original bone. On an x-ray, it looks like the peaks in the meringue topping on lemon meringue pie. The tops of the peaks are sharp and as the tendon rubs over them with each step taken, it is like scraping over shards of glass.

In some cases if it involves the joint, eventually the joint can fuse and when that happens, most of the discomfort is relieved, however flexibility is also lost.

I used rounded shoes for easier/faster breakover but the horse was never completely sound. We went on many trail rides but had to mostly walk because it was painful to trot or canter more than a few steps at a time.

The first horse I had was my forever horse so I kept him until he passed on, but the second horse had it in all three pastern joints (P1, P2 and P3-coffin) so badly that I had to euthanize him. He was a Belgian/Qtr. Cross that matured out to have all Belgian body mass on Quarter horse legs, which were insufficient to support the weight.

It's not necessarily a death sentence and there is a wide range of degrees of severity so your experience may end up anywhere along the scale.

Personally, I would do anything to avoid going down that road again. Best of luck in your decision.

Sorry for the duplication. Not sure how that happened.
     
    11-18-2013, 10:18 PM
  #5
Showing
Nope. You don't know when that horse is going to go dead lame.
     
    11-19-2013, 02:26 AM
  #6
Weanling
Do you have the resources to retire him if he goes lame? Are you okay with a horse that only can do light work?

A friend of mine takes in free horses all the time. They all have physical issues and are all over the age of 20. She just does light rides and brushes them daily. She says she doesn't want to have a horse that will outlive her. I don't think any of them are sound, but it is good for their minds to do at least some light riding.

Both my horses have lameness issues and I have health issues so I rarely ride. I miss having a horse I can canter and do faster stuff with, but with my health issues, I don't need to be pushing myself. One of my horses can only handle a 20 minute walking ride (just to help her arthritis as she gets stiff otherwise). My other horse can handle slow trail rides, but can't canter at all due to lameness issues. Both are super safe though, and to me that is the most important thing.

You could try a course of Pentosan injections which runs about $200 for a years worth for one horse. I can't afford joint injections, but do use the Pentosan and I think it helps for the arthritis. I keep bute on hand as well and use that before farrier visits or if the old mare seems more sore than usual.

I would suggest visiting the horse, see if he clicks with you, ride him, and see how he is. Plan to visit the day after riding, and see if he gets worse. Get a vet's opinion if you are really concerned.

You don't need to pump a ton of money into him- just try to keep him comfortable or pasture sound. Just be prepared to retire him at some point in the future.

Do you have pasture for him? Arthritic horses do very poorly when stalled. The other issue is can you ride him consistently?

My old mare does best if ridden at a walk for 20 minutes 3x a week. The vet thinks she has arthritis in every joint by now. Such is life when you are old, but she is happy.
     
    11-19-2013, 07:03 AM
  #7
Started
Well the horse would not be free to me but would be cheap. I can afford to board him and it would be pasture board with access to a stall as needed. He is far enough away one visit would be all there could be. Right now he is sound. He is 14 years old. I feel bad as he has been in three homes since Aug :(

Thanks for the advice. While I would love to bring him home and ride him occasionally. Those that said to many sound horses needed homes too makes the most sense. My heart just breaks for this guy and his being bounced around.
     

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