Has anyone seen this lameness in hind end? - Page 2
   

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Has anyone seen this lameness in hind end?

This is a discussion on Has anyone seen this lameness in hind end? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Stifle pain caused by farrier holding back legs too high
  • What causes a horse to lock up in the hind end while turning at full speed

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    01-23-2013, 01:34 PM
  #11
Green Broke
First, I am siding with the farrier because I see two things in this horse that my horse with the fractured sacrum has/does:

1. There's a big puffy section of inflammation right in the sacrum area.

1.1 His chiro is on prenancy leave. For now I use this pad on him every day and it has reduced the swelling/inflammation lump by 45%. http://www.backontrackproducts.com/H...-Pad-p289.html I really wanted the sheet but it was too expensive and I needed something for this horse five minutes ago. This pad performs miracles, if you're dealing with old back issues; which I think you are.

2. She is always holding her tail out, or slightly up, and I saw her slightly flick it once. That is an indicator of pain somewhere up there. And, by now, as thin as she is, that pain may very well have caused ulcers; ask me how I know that:(

Second: "dressagekid4" may very well be onto something.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dressagekid4    
Hi there, I don't think this is a lameness. I think your farrier is on a good track. It looks to me as though her pelvis has been rotated (perhaps from a fall?) and is simply holding her in that position. This is not common, but it does happen and is very much a possibility. I would recommend Structural Integration or Rolfing sessions for her. They are not too hard to find for horses, and it works somewhat like a mixture of chiropractic/massage, with the horse's connective tissue. I have seen this issue fixed (literally, fixed) with this technique. I hope this helps you! Best regards, dressagekid4
Third: I am sorry, you may have had three chiropractors out but they ALL need to go back to school IMHO --- ALL of them--------------.

Whether or not you've run out of chiro options within your driving distance, I really would take "dressagekid4's" advice and locate someone experienced in Strutural Integration or Rolfing. I'm betting they will at least be able to figure out what is wrong with her, somewhere up in the rump.

Even if you're riding her lightly, it's in her best interest to not ride her at all, until you can figure out precisely what is wrong. I wouldn't work her in the pen either - no lunging, backing, nothing. Let her do, at liberty, what she is comfortable doing
     
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    01-23-2013, 03:08 PM
  #12
Foal
No trot videos right now... But from what I can see it is only her walk that is affected. Then if she is at a gallop it is a little bit hard for her to stop.... I may have videos from her riding evaluation. We didn't know her background when I got her but from her issues we know she has definitely been abused. My vet and one of the chiropractors I have used said it was ok to ride her, but not to push it. So I only ride her like once or twice a month for now. She loves to run while turned out and while riding. Lol! And another issue she has is she will NOT tie. PERIOD. She has actually pulled back and literally flipped over not wanting to tie. It's not random either. It's ONLY when you walk her up to something you can potentially tie her to .i.e. A hitching post, a gate, a patience pole, etc. if she thinks you are about to tie her, she doesn't wait.... She drags you backwards at a speed equivalent to that of a canter and doesn't stop for 300-400 ft if there is space there! It's crazy how a horse with a lameness in her back end can do this! Looking for videos now! ;) sorry got off track!
     
    01-23-2013, 03:50 PM
  #13
Foal
Here are a few videos of her being ridden 3 weeks after I first got her. We didnt even know if she was trained! We were told it was her feet making her limp since her feet were sooooooo long they we splayed out in a V formation. This was before we knew it was something in her hip. She was being a little hard headed in the round pen too. LOL. All the head nodding is due to the bit. She hates bits! You couldn't touch her head with out trying to rear on you. She rides in a Hackamore now. I don't ride her at all like this since I found out it was a possible rear end injury and not her feet. She had her feet done the day before these videos were taken. =)




Like I said these videos were taken back in September. I have had many different people come look at her since then. Even had an equine massage therapist out to rub her down. I got Ginger for free. She was locked... LITTERALLY locked in a 8x8 stall. Master lock to open it. I went to look at her and said talked them down from 500 to free since they had basically been neglecting her. I even called animal control since she was in the same conditons as many of the other horses. They fed her a half a flake of cheap hay a day. She now gets 3 flakes of alfalfa/grass mix twice a day and a pound of Purina Ultium Pellets once a day.... 1/2 a pound at each feeding.
     
    01-23-2013, 04:25 PM
  #14
Weanling
Only watched vids and read up to dressagekids post and I highly suggest Structural Integration, also commonly known as Myofascial Release. Combined with chiropractic it will help most any alignment issue.

Think of it this way: if the joint pops out and the muscles reset around the now out-of-alignment joint, when the joint goes back in, because the fascia has literally moved (the fascial tissue is a thin layer of tissue that basically holds everything together), the joint isn't going to stay put. It's like trying to keep juice in a bottle with the lid off. Put the lid back on and it will stay put!

If all else fails, xrays and ultrasounds. I would guess it is an SI or stifle issue. Her stifle looks almost locked, but hind leg problems are so incredibly hard to figure out. Could also be her Psoas muscle has locked and unfortunately it is too deep to be reached by any human hands. I don't remember how that is fixes but should be easy to research.

Best of luck!
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ETA: Info for you on Psoas muscle:
Picture of location (as you can see, it runs through the back and stifle area down the leg: a damages or otherwise disturbed muscle could cause a strange gait) http://sreinhold.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/horse_anatomy.jpg (possibly similar to sciatica, though that is a nerve)
Nice blog explaining a lot about placement, use, disfunction, etc: http://sreinhold.wordpress.com/2010/02/16/what-lies-beneath-the-riders-seat-the-horses-psoas-muscles/
     
    01-23-2013, 06:09 PM
  #15
Weanling
Had a chance to watch the round pen video: She drags her visibly stiff right hind as well as the left. You can see her hoof dragging a bunch of sand as she moves and she swings her whole leg out, the right far more than the left.

My guesses are:
- Psoas muscle/s
- Sacroiliac injury, misalignment, tightness, etc
- Pelvic fracture
- All of the above

She clearly has problems in the spinal area. Pinpointing will be the key. If it doesn't show up through palpitations or xrays, get an ultrasound as it could be the psoas. If it is a fracture, stay off of her. If it is a misalignment, stay off of her. If it is a muscle problem, be gentle. She came from an 8x8 stall: she needs a LOT of gentle progress to build up her muscles. Imagine standing in one spot all day and then trying to go for a jog; your hips and knees would be very stiff! Give her time, and per medical advice to work her, do a LOT of ground poles, cavaletti, and stretching. Build her topline up so she can carry herself and use her body properly, even if she is only a trail horse.
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    01-23-2013, 07:54 PM
  #16
Super Moderator
I'm guessing hip or pelvis. Are you thinking this is an old injury? It old take a year to heal an injury like that. I would definitely look into some arthritis type joint supplements. I'd even consider having her blocked to rule out stifle and positively pinpoint the back.
     
    01-23-2013, 07:56 PM
  #17
Green Broke
I would wonder about broken bone in hip I think...

And stringhalt will, when turning horse sharply to one or other side, make the affected leg jerk up like a Nazi soldier did.
     
    01-23-2013, 10:04 PM
  #18
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunSlideStop    
Had a chance to watch the round pen video: She drags her visibly stiff right hind as well as the left. You can see her hoof dragging a bunch of sand as she moves and she swings her whole leg out, the right far more than the left.

My guesses are:
- Psoas muscle/s
- Sacroiliac injury, misalignment, tightness, etc
- Pelvic fracture
- All of the above

She clearly has problems in the spinal area. Pinpointing will be the key. If it doesn't show up through palpitations or xrays, get an ultrasound as it could be the psoas. If it is a fracture, stay off of her. If it is a misalignment, stay off of her. If it is a muscle problem, be gentle. She came from an 8x8 stall: she needs a LOT of gentle progress to build up her muscles. Imagine standing in one spot all day and then trying to go for a jog; your hips and knees would be very stiff! Give her time, and per medical advice to work her, do a LOT of ground poles, cavaletti, and stretching. Build her topline up so she can carry herself and use her body properly, even if she is only a trail horse.
Posted via Mobile Device
I'm going to get a chiropractor out here that I was just recommended by a few more people. And my farrier actually recommended him too. His name is Dr. Phillip Pinto in Newhall, CA. Maybe he will be better for my girl. He practices on equines, canines, and people too! Everything I've read about him seems good! I hope he can figure it out! I'd love to work her a little bit instead of keeping her as a pasture pet. But whatever she needs now will get done. She's too sweet of a horse to just let her go to waste. Lol! I have other options to ride though so she's cool. She gets turned out of her 12x36 ft stall every other day in a paddock to do what she wants. It's amazing how far she has come. When I first got her, it took HOURS and I mean hours to catch her. She would pin you in a stall trying to kick you. Wouldn't come anywhere near you to even get petted. Now she puts her head in her halter for you, walks up to you for petting and brushing (or course treats too) and its just nuts!
     
    01-23-2013, 10:26 PM
  #19
Yearling
Show us her back feet. Take pictures from the ground on concrete or a mat. Make sure the feet are very clean. Also, stand her up square on the concrete and take pictures above her from the back looking up her spine towards her head and her confo from the back (tie up her tail) and a side confo shot. Make sure she is square and standing how she is comfortable and on a level surface.
     
    01-24-2013, 02:41 AM
  #20
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trinity3205    
Show us her back feet. Take pictures from the ground on concrete or a mat. Make sure the feet are very clean. Also, stand her up square on the concrete and take pictures above her from the back looking up her spine towards her head and her confo from the back (tie up her tail) and a side confo shot. Make sure she is square and standing how she is comfortable and on a level surface.
I've only got a couple photos of her backs right now. I will take some new ones later. I will post the ones I have in just a sec ;)
     

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