This has been killing me.... - Page 4
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

This has been killing me....

This is a discussion on This has been killing me.... within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Horses shut up inhaling amonia

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    11-07-2009, 06:05 PM
  #31
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by New_image    
Welcome! Glad to see some who have common seance.

In this case I would assume the extent of the damage was done because of the concrete floors, that said I agree - Stalling is a cruel and unusual punishment to any horse. (With the exception of medically requiring a stall, however a small paddock outside would be by far my choice of confinement)
My 22 year old QH mare would cripple right up if stalled even for 12 hours with 12 hour turnouts. Its un-natural. I do not care if your stalls are bedded with $100 bills and feather pillows offering fans, AC/Heat and automatic water tanks lined in gold. I do not care if the horse is a $500,000 show stallion or a $50 flea bitten pony A horse is a horse is a horse. Horses were meant to roam, they do not stall themselves in the wild. I cannot be convinced that any horse wants to be stalled. Its been trained to be stalled. A horse who has been stalled is fed in its stall. Its groomed, praised, loved, cared for, grained, fed and all other goodness in its stall, hence it thinks stall = "Let me in!" A brand new foal will not pop out of the womb thinking "Hmm, two acre pasture to play in and nibble on grass or a wooden box to stand around in.... WOODEN BOX! Yippie!"
Stalling instills bad behavior. It creates bored horses who paw, chew wood, crib, pace, weave and otherwise go out of there minds. Then people by candy lik it toys and busy balls in attempt to give the poor animal a piece of mind rather than -God forbid- Letting the horse out?!
Being confined in even a well vented barn causes respiratory issues. Your tack gets covered in dust, every thing in the barn is coated in the same wonderful dust and people choose to have the horse breath this every day for a period of time, then wonder why the barn yearly has the snots going around?
Has anyone noticed its the stalled horses who turn up lame after a good romp in the pasture? Read stories and pay attention the catch is "I was on my way to bring the horses in and I noticed Wildfire limping...."

If someone can give me a list of reasons why a horse should be kept in a box I could use the laugh....
I certainly don't believe that all horses should be stalled, period. But some should. And you seem to be suggesting that all horses should be in pasture.
I leave it up to my horses. I observe where they're healthier as well as happier- in a pasture 24/7 or in a stall with bedding and daily turnout with a buddy. My last horse, my pony, preferred pasture, so I let him live there. If he lived in a stall, he would be antsy and if kept there for a long time, would probably have developed stall vices.
My current horse, however, is much happier and healthier in a stall. He's around other horses, but they can't beat him up and take his food as was happening before I bought him (which caused him to be nervous and grossly underweight, as no one was doing anything about the problem)
When I put him in a stall, he became happier, less nervous, and definitely much healthier. He gets plenty of exercise and is very healthy.
Maybe- possibly he would do well if he could live only with other extremely timid horses, but this would be hard to achieve. Why bother? He does great where he is.
That's just my experience. Nothing is 100% either way.
People should just listen to their horses.
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    11-07-2009, 11:01 PM
  #32
Foal
Can someone tell me why its so horrible to stall a horse at night and be let out in the AM? Whats so cruel about that? Horses rather be warm and dry than out in wind rain or cold. I mean yes if its nice out by all means keep them out, but what is wrong with bringing them in, in crappy weather my horses stand by the door when they know its time to come in. Its NOT Cruel!!!! Im not dragging my horses into their stalls. They walk into there own stall freely, I don't ever lead them. We train horses TO DO EVERYTHING!!!!!!! so why is it different to train a horse to be stalled Vs. Training them to be ridden?


Please tell me if im wrong!!!!!!!???????!!!!!!!!
     
    11-07-2009, 11:23 PM
  #33
Weanling
Why not let the horse choose when he/she wants to be in or out of the rain? Why not have a shelter provided where they can go in and out as they please? I mean, I guess I understand if some ppl board they don't have the choice, but I just personally don't believe in stalling a horse except for injury, etc. I do believe in providing them shelter that they can go into at their own time and leave whenever they want.

But just because I don't believe in something, doesn't mean it is cruel. This is all my opinion and I respect other ppl's opinions that do stall as well. :)
     
    11-07-2009, 11:43 PM
  #34
Started
Can someone tell me why its so horrible to stall a horse at night and be let out in the AM? We train horses TO DO EVERYTHING!!!!!!!
Can I train you to enjoy prison? You must agree prison isn't what it used to be, its quite the cushy living now all things considered. So for the next 24 years of your life you can live in a 8x10 cell, alone, for 14 hours a day. But don't worry on nice sunny days when laundry is done we'll let you play basket ball in the court under supervision for a few hours!

Be realistic, its a horse. They weren't created to be boxed up and theres no other way to spin that. I suppose it isn't the end of the world but I've worked in barns and seen stalled horses. In fact, I just went to a nice & quite frankly gorgeous fancy show barn the other day to look at a mare. It was 30 degrees and raining so the horses were -of course- stalled all weekend. This was a Sunday morning, no one cleans stalls on Sundays and the horses had been in since Friday night. Given the fact that it was 30 and chilly the barn was shut up tight and heated to 50 degrees. Great for humans, bad for horses - especially the poor souls who were blanketed in addition! Horses were screaming, kicking stalls, pacing, nickering frantically. The smell ALONE was enough to give me a nauseating head ache, 20+ stalls of horse pee baked at 50 degreese and spun into the ground mixed with the dust. There they sat, hoping someone would let them out in the rain for just a minute to get a fresh breath of air.
You know, I bet your right. I bet that those twenty or so stalled horses on there pine bedding, blanketed with the heat running were much happier than my poor unfortunate souls who were standing out in the rain, 30 degree temps, no blankets, rollin' in mud, not using run-ins.

No, that's what humans like to see. A clean, dry, toasty horse. That does not mean the horses are happy nor does it make it better for them to stand locked up breathing ammonia and dust. If your horse is so happy to be dry and great full to you that you've locked him up so he can stay warm and dry as you put it, why not just let him have run in access? If he SO loves a stall, a barn, a roof over his head and a bed of shavings... Why not let him have a nice dry well bedded run-in? .......Because 96% of horses WONT use them and humans look outside to see a "poor wet horse". Conclusion, he doesn't appreciate the prison cell as much as you think.

I agree there are exceptions. However most horses have, as I said, been trained to like there stalls. Its what makes there owners happy, its where they are fed, its a routine and they get used to it, creatures of habit.

You ask whats so wrong about it.... (Read my posts, bad behavior, boredom, un natural, bad for heath both respiratory and legs/joints etc) I say give me a list of reasons WHY a healthy average horse should be stalled regularly?

That's all I'm saying, JMHO :)
     
    11-07-2009, 11:59 PM
  #35
Weanling
^ love it and so agree

At the most I would love LOVE to have a yard or round pen to put charli in with some hay for a few hours a day in winter, cause it can get to icky and muddy. I disagree with constant stalling
     
    11-08-2009, 12:13 AM
  #36
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by juneau    
horses rather be warm and dry than out in wind rain or cold.
My horse is out 24/7 and has a shelter he can go into. Only a few times have I seen him in it, mostly for shade, he much prefers to be huddled naturally with herdmates in bad weather than alone in a stall.

Sometimes though, when I am grooming him outside I feel he wants to go into the barn (usually when it's very hot and/or sunny) and sometimes when we're in the barn he wants to go outside.

To answer the OP, I think stalling is very harmful to a horse in just about every way. It removes them from just about every naturally occurring element in their life and dulls their instincts down to nothing.

Just today, I went to the farm and noticed a new horse in the gelding paddock. I saw right away that he was very thin - a standardbred, probably a race horse. The Canadiens had beaten him to a pulp. He has no herd instincts because at his old stable he was stalled 24/7 unless he was racing, so he doesn't make any moves to defend himself he just runs away. His new owners love him very much and they're moving him across the street to the individual paddocks.

Normally, I'm all for herds and turnout, and natural life, but then I meet a horse like that who, through no fault of his own, can't even defend himself from a two-year-old half his size, and I acknowledge that since that that his all he knows, putting him out is the thing that becomes cruel.

By stalling horses people mess with their very nature. Riding, you change his behavior for a short time but he can go back out with the herd and there won't be any difference between him and a completely untrained, unhandled horse. Stalling you interrupt his way of life down to the very core, he can't feel the safety of his companions near his flank while he sleeps, on a rainy day he can't stand near another and scratch each other's withers, and saddest of all, he can't feel a fresh breeze come in from the North, lift his soul and fill him with a joy that sends him into a wild gallop, kicking at the wind and racing his companions across the field.
     
    11-08-2009, 12:17 AM
  #37
Started
My horses back home have 24 hour turnout with access to their stalls. I just leave them open during the day. They are sand, then mats, then shavings. They also have an overhang they like to hang out under. My mare is arthritic and being turned out is essential for her health and happiness. They are also much more willing to come in - because the know they aren't going to be cooped up forever.

The barn where I teach lessons offers pasture board as well as full board, but their stalls are dirt, mats, and shavings with HUGE paddock/runs connected to each stall. Each full board horse gets 12 hours of pasture turnout each day as well.
     
    11-08-2009, 12:21 AM
  #38
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by New_image    
Can someone tell me why its so horrible to stall a horse at night and be let out in the AM? We train horses TO DO EVERYTHING!!!!!!!
Can I train you to enjoy prison? You must agree prison isn't what it used to be, its quite the cushy living now all things considered. So for the next 24 years of your life you can live in a 8x10 cell, alone, for 14 hours a day. But don't worry on nice sunny days when laundry is done we'll let you play basket ball in the court under supervision for a few hours!

Be realistic, its a horse. They weren't created to be boxed up and theres no other way to spin that. I suppose it isn't the end of the world but I've worked in barns and seen stalled horses. In fact, I just went to a nice & quite frankly gorgeous fancy show barn the other day to look at a mare. It was 30 degrees and raining so the horses were -of course- stalled all weekend. This was a Sunday morning, no one cleans stalls on Sundays and the horses had been in since Friday night. Given the fact that it was 30 and chilly the barn was shut up tight and heated to 50 degrees. Great for humans, bad for horses - especially the poor souls who were blanketed in addition! Horses were screaming, kicking stalls, pacing, nickering frantically. The smell ALONE was enough to give me a nauseating head ache, 20+ stalls of horse pee baked at 50 degreese and spun into the ground mixed with the dust. There they sat, hoping someone would let them out in the rain for just a minute to get a fresh breath of air.
You know, I bet your right. I bet that those twenty or so stalled horses on there pine bedding, blanketed with the heat running were much happier than my poor unfortunate souls who were standing out in the rain, 30 degree temps, no blankets, rollin' in mud, not using run-ins.

No, that's what humans like to see. A clean, dry, toasty horse. That does not mean the horses are happy nor does it make it better for them to stand locked up breathing ammonia and dust. If your horse is so happy to be dry and great full to you that you've locked him up so he can stay warm and dry as you put it, why not just let him have run in access? If he SO loves a stall, a barn, a roof over his head and a bed of shavings... Why not let him have a nice dry well bedded run-in? .......Because 96% of horses WONT use them and humans look outside to see a "poor wet horse". Conclusion, he doesn't appreciate the prison cell as much as you think.

I agree there are exceptions. However most horses have, as I said, been trained to like there stalls. Its what makes there owners happy, its where they are fed, its a routine and they get used to it, creatures of habit.

You ask whats so wrong about it.... (Read my posts, bad behavior, boredom, un natural, bad for heath both respiratory and legs/joints etc) I say give me a list of reasons WHY a healthy average horse should be stalled regularly?

That's all I'm saying, JMHO :)
I have to agree 100% of what you say. You explain it like it is and I LOVE that. Thank you for such a great post.
     
    11-08-2009, 12:38 AM
  #39
Green Broke
My horses will RUN to the gate if you go out to get them in the rain, they WANT to go where it's dry and warm. I don't drag them in they don't refuse, and I havn't trained them to like their stalls. I'm not doing ANYTHING to harm them, our stalls stay imaculatly clean, so does our barn, it never smells of amonia, it is never overly dusty unless in stirring up said dust, My horses are alot happier inside when it's cold and raining than outside.
New_image, if it was 30 degrees it wouldn't be raining, it would freeze on contact to the ground.
     
    11-08-2009, 12:53 AM
  #40
Trained
Eesh, I'd allow my horse to kick my ass if I ever stalled them in that condition.
I have just one gelding who's a barn baby because he was such a chicken (When he was a three year old the bushes by his pen stopped from going towards that end of the pasture because the wind would shake them, and he was for certain something was going to bound out and eat him) but he's much better now.
I have some horses that don't like to be in a stall, and those that absolutely detest it.
I raise my horses in a "range free" type of enviroment - they have 160 acres to roam on, but because I'm out there everyday, they get lots of human interaction and come around super quick to people.
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hay cost is killing me loric Horse Health 8 09-01-2009 01:29 PM
Killing gnats?? Joshie General Off Topic Discussion 12 01-14-2009 07:08 PM
Killing my trees Vidaloco Horse Health 23 02-28-2008 01:46 AM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0