Has this ever happened to you? - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 19 Old 05-09-2010, 02:14 AM
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A horse's stomach contents also leave the stomach and go down into the intestines about 15 minutes after entering the stomach. So if they were to throw up it's a very narrow window of opportunity.
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post #12 of 19 Old 05-09-2010, 02:16 AM
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Originally Posted by roro View Post
I've heard from multiple horsemen that vomiting is a very rare occurrence .... I would need a video from you and some way to validate that it came from the stomach and not the esophagus as I trust your words as much as you trust mine.
Yep, good to be skeptical, huh? Couldn't give you a vid, as I'd have to go back in time to do it. I didn't know what was happening the first time & didn't believe it either, based on common belief. But three different vets asserted to me that horses *could* vomit - as explained, it's just very difficult & therefore rare for them. Now I appreciate that even 'experts' are not always right either tho... That's why I am interested in any scientific sources that may prove either or.
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post #13 of 19 Old 05-09-2010, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
But three different vets asserted to me that horses *could* vomit - as explained, it's just very difficult & therefore rare for them.
I think what is causing debate here is technical terms. Vomiting actually has a very specific definition which is different from regurgitating. Vomiting implies a distinct set of steps and involves contents of the stomach and sometimes small intestine refluxing back up into the esophagus and out the mouth. If the contents have not yet passed into the stomach, they can be regurgitated out of the esophagus and hence not "technically" vomited but most vets will refer to it as such. So, you're both right!

to the OP though, feed aversion can be a sign of something wrong with the grain (as another poster said). It can be mixing error or a mycotoxin, any number of things. To be safe, what I would do is ditch the grain and get a new bag. Yes, it's throwing money away but could save you a ton down the road, even the lives of your horses!!
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post #14 of 19 Old 05-09-2010, 09:36 PM
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Originally Posted by loosie View Post
Yep, good to be skeptical, huh? Couldn't give you a vid, as I'd have to go back in time to do it. I didn't know what was happening the first time & didn't believe it either, based on common belief. But three different vets asserted to me that horses *could* vomit - as explained, it's just very difficult & therefore rare for them. Now I appreciate that even 'experts' are not always right either tho... That's why I am interested in any scientific sources that may prove either or.
Did you notice that I said very rare occurrence, not impossible? What are you even trying to argue now? I've heard 'my way' from multiple people, you've heard 'your way' from multiple people. I have no reason to provide links for you when you have your own internet to satiate your own curiosity.

"The trouble with the world is that the stupid are certain and the intelligent are full of doubt"
-Bertrand Russel

Last edited by roro; 05-09-2010 at 09:41 PM.
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post #15 of 19 Old 05-09-2010, 10:16 PM
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I think the biggest thing here is to understand that vomiting in horses IS extremely rare, and that it means there is something seriously wrong with your horse, and to get in contact with a vet, because even if he seems fine afterward, he may not be...the vomiting could cause the stomach and the valve to the stomach to rupture. Plain and simple...

"The ideal horseman has the courage of a lion, the patience of a saint, and the hands of a woman..."
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post #16 of 19 Old 05-10-2010, 04:05 AM
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Originally Posted by roro View Post
Did you notice that I said very rare occurrence, not impossible? What are you even trying to argue now? .... I have no reason to provide links for you when you have your own internet to satiate your own curiosity.
I don't get what bit of my reply to you you are taking as argument?? I know you 'have no reason', unless the fact that I requested it is reason enough. As I said, I'm interested to learn more, that's all. Aren't these forums for providing people with info even tho they can find it elsewhere?

BTW, thanks Tealamutt for clarifying that point.
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post #17 of 19 Old 05-10-2010, 01:34 PM
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Originally Posted by mom2pride View Post
I think the biggest thing here is to understand that vomiting in horses IS extremely rare, and that it means there is something seriously wrong with your horse, and to get in contact with a vet, because even if he seems fine afterward, he may not be...the vomiting could cause the stomach and the valve to the stomach to rupture. Plain and simple...

yes, thanks mom2pride, let's stick with the issue at hand- these horses should be seen by a vet or at least you should be consulting with one!
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post #18 of 19 Old 05-11-2010, 10:48 AM Thread Starter
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Thank you for all your concern. I am happy to report that my horses are both doing very well, and have been eating, pooping, and doing all the things good healthy horses should do . I didn't intend to create such a debate, and didn't want anybody to get offended. I think it is important to note that if a horse is seen or is suspected of having anything come back out the wrong end, being vomit or regurgitation, they should be monitored and a vet should most possibly be consulted. Thank you all for your replys!
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post #19 of 19 Old 05-11-2010, 12:12 PM
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If I am not mistaken, feed coming out of the mouth and nose of the horse are signs of choke. In many cases the food block will pass on its own (with help from the horse through coughing and why there is regurgitated food on the horses nose and mouth). But it still might be necessary to get a vet out in case all the food particles have not passed. In this case, it can lead to aspiration and perhaps a lung infection.
Also, to address the "vomiting" topic. A horse can NOT vomit. Due to the steep angle at which the esophagus enters the stomach as well as muscle movement, vomiting is impossible. The only time one will see true vomiting is when a horses stomach ruptures and pressure forces digestive material back up the esophagus. It is possible, however, for food that has not yet left the esophagus to be regurgitated.


Last edited by ALottaTrot; 05-11-2010 at 12:13 PM. Reason: Add picture
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