Help with Colic
 
 

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Help with Colic

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  • Gelding a stallion help reduce colic?
  • CAN FEEDING HORSES YOGURT HELP WITH COLIC

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    08-07-2013, 11:09 PM
  #1
Banned
Help with Colic

I have a 9 year old gaited horse gelding. Who keeps showing signs of colic, depression, head down, flipping up his top lip, kicking or bitting at his stomach, straining, coughing, but not rolling or sweating. He has done this 3 times in a month that I know of. They only last for 30 minutes to an hour.

I have recently moved to a new barn in late june and am able to feed him grain. Since he was on 180 acres pasture and nothing else. Could the grain be making him do this?

I do not know if this is being caused by the feed or if he needs his teeth floated because he eats very slow.

I have also heard of horses choking and making the same sounds.

I think I have attached a picture of him throwing his top lip up.

Any input or advice is very much appreciated.

Thanks in advance!!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg colic.jpg (17.6 KB, 116 views)
     
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    08-08-2013, 12:37 AM
  #2
Super Moderator
Does he have a good appetite? Is he pooping regularly? Drinking? Can you hear gut sounds when you put your ear to his belly? Both sides?

How is his breathing? Slow as normal, or faster and shallower? Is he sensitive if you put your hand on his gut and press a bit?

Those would be signs of colic.
     
    08-08-2013, 11:49 AM
  #3
Weanling
First, if you can, have a bottle or a pre-filled syringe, of banamine. IF it is colic or if it gets worse, the banamine will help relieve the pain till you can call a vet. I have a bottle of it as the last colic we had on our farm, it was bad and we ended up giving almost the whole bottle to our draft mare by morning before making the decision to rush her to the emergency clinic.

That being said, his over all body looks thin. What do you feed him? Has he had any health issues lately that you have had to treat him for? What do you do use him for? Riding? Trail? Showing?

Have you thought about giving him probiotics? We did that for a good 60 days with our mare till she was back on track. It does help if their stomach is upset or they just need help with the good flora in their gut, which also helps with digestion and better absorption of food. If you can't afford the probiotics, see if he will eat flavored yogurt in his grain, ours love strawberry.

If it continues, I really urge you to contact your veterinarian and have them do a complete check up on him, teeth, coat, and see what they say. Good luck.
     
    08-08-2013, 11:28 PM
  #4
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyliny    
does he have a good appetite? Is he pooping regularly? Drinking? Can you hear gut sounds when you put your ear to his belly? Both sides?

How is his breathing? Slow as normal, or faster and shallower? Is he sensitive if you put your hand on his gut and press a bit?

Those would be signs of colic.
he always has a great appetite. He poops regular. Drinks good. His stomach does not make many sounds at all. His breathing is normal except for when he is having a "colic moment" then it gets shallower. He is not sensitive.
     
    08-08-2013, 11:36 PM
  #5
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreySorrel    
First, if you can, have a bottle or a pre-filled syringe, of banamine. IF it is colic or if it gets worse, the banamine will help relieve the pain till you can call a vet. I have a bottle of it as the last colic we had on our farm, it was bad and we ended up giving almost the whole bottle to our draft mare by morning before making the decision to rush her to the emergency clinic.

That being said, his over all body looks thin. What do you feed him? Has he had any health issues lately that you have had to treat him for? What do you do use him for? Riding? Trail? Showing?

Have you thought about giving him probiotics? We did that for a good 60 days with our mare till she was back on track. It does help if their stomach is upset or they just need help with the good flora in their gut, which also helps with digestion and better absorption of food. If you can't afford the probiotics, see if he will eat flavored yogurt in his grain, ours love strawberry.

If it continues, I really urge you to contact your veterinarian and have them do a complete check up on him, teeth, coat, and see what they say. Good luck.
he stays kind of thin. He gets a 1/2 scoop of the brown bag feed from the co-op, which is where they make their own (?). He has never had any health issues except for once when he had a fixated patella. But that's it. We do everything with him. He may get rode once a week, but he trail rides and shows when I find a local show.

I have never thought about the probiotics. I was thinking of changing grain to the equus lifestyles I think is what it is called. It doesnt have as much molasses as the grain im using now.

I have contacted the vet. She just told me to give him some bute and wait 15-30 minutes. Not the best advice I have received but when I told her all the symptoms she said it was just a mild case of colic. But it is happening more and more.

When I had his coggins pulled in March 2013 the vet said he could use a floating but he was only ramping up a little bit and it could probably wait until next year. So I decided to wait since we was at a show. But now I am thinking that might have something to do with what is happening. But I will probably start I with changing grain and adding yogurt or if I can find some probiotics.
     
    09-06-2013, 10:51 PM
  #6
Banned
I have ruled this to possibly being choke. Has anyone else had this problem? If so what did you do help correct the problem? I know putting smooth stones in the bottom of the fed pan, mixing water in with his feed, possibly having his teeth floated and moving him to another area during feeding time since he does eat next to another gelding. They are about 15 yards from each other.
     
    09-06-2013, 11:15 PM
  #7
Trained
If he's seriously choking, some chewed up feed should come out of his nose. How does he eat hay, slow also, or only the grain?
Without seeing what he does, we all can only guess, of course, but it sounds like either colic or a pretty good toothache, which can literally take them off their feet. Points on the teeth cause sores inside the mouth, think craters, and that hurts.
He could also be colicking from tapeworms, or the feed change. Or even have ulcers.

I'd start with finding him a pelleted feed and soak it before feeding, until you get his teeth checked and done. That should also avoid choking.
     
    09-06-2013, 11:18 PM
  #8
Weanling
Have you checked for an ulcer?
     
    09-07-2013, 10:10 PM
  #9
Banned
That was another thought. He ate moldy hay for over a year could this have caused an ulcer?
     
    09-07-2013, 10:28 PM
  #10
Banned
Why in the world would you knowingly feed moldy hay to your horse for over a year? No wonder he's having problems.
     

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