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Help with hooves please.

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  • Adm grostrong mintrate ingredients
  • Grostrong mintrates

 
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    03-13-2010, 07:56 AM
  #21
Started
WOW 3qta of Gro STrong??? Which one was she on?? THe Ultra or Minatrate??


I will leave the feet up to others, I will mention that the rings are each change made with her stress, feed changes, sickness, about everything will show as a ring

Instead of a hoof supplement look into the Gro STrong Minitrate supplement 1lb a day does better then most others and has more of what your horse will need :)
     
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    03-13-2010, 09:02 AM
  #22
Weanling
I'm pretty neutral on the barefoot vs shoes issue. I prefer to keep mine barefoot, but if we're heading to the trails (it is extremely rocky here) I'll put on shoes, and will shoe for temporary support issues if needed...

Per those pics, dump your farrier... that's AWFUL. When all else fails, google a CJF in your area. I'm not saying all Certified Farriers are great, but you have a better chance of a good job opposed to anyone that buys themselves some tools and calls themselves a farrier. Your horse will thank you :)

*I wanted to add, mother nature will correct a bad trim job to a point, can't with shoes
     
    03-13-2010, 09:06 AM
  #23
Foal
Quote:
What I see on the original poster's horse is high heels (notice the frogs come nowhere near to touching the ground when viewed from behind). Clinches that were never cut to a proper length (which, in my opinion, is very shoddy workmanship) and maybe the biggest thing that jumps out and grabs me (which has nothing to do with the farrier) is the growth rings in the feet. That can be a sign of low-grade laminitis. So that might be something to look into, especially if the horse is on grass or getting grain. You can have the best farrier or trimmer in the world, but if you have low-grade laminitis or metabolic issues, you will have a sore horse with less than optimal feet.

I am NOT one of those people that soaks their hay and denounces grain. I actually give my horses a little bit of sweet feed each evening as a treat. But I don't have grass and I've never had to maintain a horse on grass either. I'm sure I would be always worried about laminitis if I did. I just think the growth rings are note-worthy.

If I personally were shoeing this horse, I would bring the heels down AND bring the breakover back. Something like a Natural Balance shoe. Then the frogs would get stimulus from the ground and the horse would have some breakover.

As for barefoot, I have been on both sides and consider myself pretty neutral.

I took farrier science, learned everything I could, watched a lot of farriers and shod my own horses for probably 8 or more years.

Then I had some health problems and wasn't able to shoe for a while. I went on the Internet and discovered that a lot of people believed in barefoot and decided to try it for myself.

My Mustang, whom was shod for years when I bought him, transitioned GREAT from shod to barefoot. Maybe because he wears a size 2 shoe (nice, big healthy feet) and had a good barefoot start in life since he was feral.

My Paint, whom was in his 20's at the time, never did do well barefoot. I always had to ride him in boots. He's barefoot now, but that's because he's 30yrs. Old and no longer ride-able.

My Arab did really well barefoot for the most part.

Barefoot works GREAT if you don't have to ride on rocks. If you ride on rocks, it is still possible, but I find myself always worrying about the rocks even if my horse seems to handle it okay. I usually use boots if I think I will encounter tons of rocks on the trail. But my Mustang is basically able to go anywhere barefoot now, wether his Mommy worries about it or not! It did take over a year, maybe more like two years, for him to get really tough feet. In the meantime, Easyboot Epics were my best friends.

I am not convinced that all horses can get to the point of riding barefoot in the rocks without hoof boots. (on soft ground, yes). But even if I am not sure a horse will make it to that point, I plan to keep doing it because I do think it is healthier for the foot to be without shoes 99% of the time. And then if I am riding the horse in the rocks, I will use hoof boots. So I think I am barefoot to stay, even if it means booting the horse in rocky terrain.

I think keeping the horse on the terrain you plan to ride on is the key to getting good feet, but my pens simply aren't big enough to give them enough movement and keep them out of the mud in wintery weather. So probably some of my barefoot limitations are due to not having a big enough turnout area for the horses to move around in. I did try the pea gravel but most of it sunk to China!



Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/help-hooves-please-49932/page2/#ixzz0i3woCkUT
Thank you :) it was very informative. She is on grass during the day (but it is pretty much dead) and isn't on grain. This is also the first time she has been on grass in YEARS (at least 4 since I have had her for one year and the lady before me kept her at the same place, on a drylot) so I am worried about laminitis/founder.

I was told that her last owner had tried taking her shoes off and she was dead lame and her hooves wore off. I am not sure what type of transitioning they did.

I trail ride (hopefully a lot more once the mud isn't up to our knees) and there is a TON of gravel. I always worry as well

Sadly I board so I don't really have a say in what type of footing they have and if we tried to put anything down I think it would join your gravel in china :)

Quote:
WOW 3qta of Gro STrong??? Which one was she on?? THe Ultra or Minatrate??


I will leave the feet up to others, I will mention that the rings are each change made with her stress, feed changes, sickness, about everything will show as a ring

Instead of a hoof supplement look into the Gro STrong Minitrate supplement 1lb a day does better then most others and has more of what your horse will need :)
__________________



Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/help-hooves-please-49932/page3/#post575774#ixzz0i42RUxT3
I am pretty sure Ultra, she was getting one scoop morning and night (I just assumed it was 3 quarts...)

Thank you for more info on the rings :) I will be looking up more info on that.

She is now on a no grain diet,
6 flakes of (per day) and on pasture (almost everything is dead though) and 1/2 pound of beet pulp(to mix her her stuff in) 2x a day w/ her Grandvite and Cocosoya. The Grandvite I believe is similar to the Gro STrong Minitrate, I will go check what they both have in it and compare :) Thanks!

Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/help-hooves-please-49932/page2/#ixzz0i46DKDm8
     
    03-13-2010, 09:17 AM
  #24
Foal
Quote:
I'm pretty neutral on the barefoot vs shoes issue. I prefer to keep mine barefoot, but if we're heading to the trails (it is extremely rocky here) I'll put on shoes, and will shoe for temporary support issues if needed...

Per those pics, dump your farrier... that's AWFUL. When all else fails, google a CJF in your area. I'm not saying all Certified Farriers are great, but you have a better chance of a good job opposed to anyone that buys themselves some tools and calls themselves a farrier. Your horse will thank you :)

*I wanted to add, mother nature will correct a bad trim job to a point, can't with shoes

Read more: http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/help-hooves-please-49932/page3/#post575774#ixzz0i47wtt04
Now I just have to find a farrier over here who does a good job, that is neutral :P

I am going to start trail riding about once a week and the majority of the trails are gravel. So I wouldn't be able to put the shoes on and then pull them off :/

It's a sticky situation with the farrier (I am sure no one has had that happen :P) but I will do what is best for my horse.


After I finish replying here I will be googling farriers in my area and then I will go talk to some people I know at the feed store :) Thanks!
     
    03-13-2010, 09:43 AM
  #25
Foal
I really don't know what I am looking for....I will be going to the feed store in a little bit to see if they can shed some light, but in the meantime if anyone wants to take a stab at it?



This is the ingredients for the Gro Strong mintrate.
GUARANTEED ANALYSIS
Crude Protein, not less than .............................. 33.0%
Crude Fat, not less than ..................................... 2.00%
Crude Fiber, not more than .................................. 6.5%
Calcium (Ca), not less than ............................... .3.85%
Calcium (Ca), not more than ............................... 4.85%
Phosphorus (P), not less than ............................... 2.0%
Salt (NaCl), not less than...................................... 5.5%
Salt (NaCl), not more than..................................... 6.6%
Copper (Cu), not less than................................ 400 ppm
Selenium (Se), not less than............................ 6.00 ppm
Zinc (Zn), not less than.................................. 1,550 ppm
Vitamin A, not less than 55,000 ...............................IU/lb
Vitamin E, not less than 500 .... ...............................IU/lb
Vitamin D3, not less than 5,200 ...............................IU/lb

INSTRUCTIONS FOR FEEDING
MoorMan’s GROSTRONG Mintrate for Horses is not a complete feed – it must be fed with forage. GROSTRONG Mintrate can be fed alone, used as a top dress over other feed, or used as a mixer pellet for feed or grain mixes (see table below). The total Mintrate-feed/grain mixture should be fed at up to 3 lb per horse, per meal. All ration changes should be made gradually over a period of 7 to 10 days. Clean, fresh water should always be available.

For mature idle horses: Feed 0.5-1 lb of GROSTRONG Mintrate daily and 1.5 to 2.5 lb of
Good-quality forage per 100 lb of body weight daily.

For horses at work, pregnant mares, lactating mares and stallions in breeding season:
GROSTRONG Mintrate .......20%
Feed or Grain Mix* .............80%
Total ................................100%

Feed 1/4 to 1 lb of the above mixed feed per 100 lb of body weight daily. Amount of mixed feed will vary depending on amount of activity, stage of pregnancy, stage of lactation, condition of horse, forage quality, etc. Feed 2 to 3.5 lb of good quality forage per 100 lb body weight daily along with the GROSTRONG Mintrate-grain mix.

For long yearlings and two-year-olds:
GROSTRONG Mintrate ...............20%
Feed or Grain Mix* ......................80%
Total .........................................100%

Feed 1/2 to 1 lb of the above mixed feed per 100 lb of body weight daily. Amount of mixed feed will vary depending on amount of activity, condition of animal, forage quality, etc. Feed 1.5 to 2.5 lb of good quality forage per 100 lb of body weight daily along with the GROSTRONG Mintrate-grain mix.

For yearlings
GROSTRONG Mintrate.............. 25%
Feed or Grain Mix* ....................75%
Total ......................................100%

Feed 0.25 to 1 lb of the above mixed ration and 1 to 2 lb of good quality forage per 100 lb of body weight daily. Divide equally into at least 2 meals each day.

For weanlings:
GROSTRONG Mintrate ...............30%
Feed or Grain Mix* ......................70%
Total ........................................100%

Feed 0.5 to 1.5 lb of the above mixed ration and 1 to 1.5 lb of good quality forage per 100 lb of body weight daily. Divide equally into at least 2 meals each day.

For nursing foals (creep ration)
GROSTRONG Mintrate ..................35%
Feed or Grain Mix* ........................65%
Total ...........................................100%

Feed 0.25 to 0.75 lb of the above mixed ration per 100 lb of body weight daily along with mare’s milk and good-quality forage fed free-choice.

*Feed should be SENIORGLO or any other low-starch feed from ADM Alliance Nutrition. Grain mix should be predominantly oats, with 20% or less corn, as desired. Corn should be cracked or steam-flaked for growing horses. Oats may be fed whole, crimped or rolled. Grain mixes with higher digestible fiber and less starch (to minimize digestive disorders) are recommended, and can be made by replacing some of the oats and/or corn with alfalfa pellets and/or soybean hull pellets. For custom feeding suggestions, call 1 800-680-8254.

SALT: A basic level of salt is included in GROSTRONG Mintrate for Horses. However, the salt required by horses varies with level of activity and should be offered free-choice.


And this is the ingredients for Grandvite.
Declared Ingredients

IngredientPer ServingPer PoundTryptophan135 mg0.23%Proline590 mg1.04%Arginine790 mg1.39%Glycine485 mg0.85%Isoleucine540 mg0.95%Leucine895 mg1.57%Valine575 mg1.01%Tyrosine395 mg0.69%Cystine170 mg0.29%Glutamine2,045 mg3.6%Phenylalanine575 mg1.01%Threonine450 mg0.79%Alanine500 mg0.88%Histadine305 mg0.53%Omega 3 Fatty Acids1500 mg12,000 mgOmega 6 Fatty Acids420 mg3,360 mgCrude Protein min 25%Crude Fiber max 6.5%Crude Fat 6%Ash 24%Vitamin A22,500 iu180,000 iuVitamin D-32,660 iu21,300 iuVitamin E500 iu4,000 iuThiamine, B-148 mg384 mgRiboflavin, B-250 mg400 mgd Pantothenic Acid, B-542 mg336 mgVitamin B-618 mg144 mgVitamin B-12150 mcg1,200 mcgBiotin1.5 mg12 mgCholine275 mg2,200 mgNiacin125 mg1,000 mgFolic Acid60 mg480 mgVitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)500 mg4,000 mgBeta Carotene4 mg32 mgLysine1,500 mg12,020 mgMethionine335 mg2,676 mgCalcium (Ca) min1,870 mg3.3%Calcium (Ca) max2,495 mg4.4%Phosphorus (min)990 mg1.75%Salt min3,628 mg6.40%Manganese148 mg2,600 ppmCopper277 mg0.49%Iron250 mg4,419 ppmZinc200 mg3,527 ppmPotassium1,245 mg2.2 ppmMagnesium580 mg1.5%Sulfur79 mg1,395 mgIodine1 mg.0018%Selenium1 mg.0018%Cobalt1 mg.0018%Lipase 40 units
Back to Top Other Ingredients

Soy Grits, Yeast Culture Dehydrated, Dried Cane Molasses, Sodium Selenite, Ascorbic Acid, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate, Vitamin E Supplement, Magnesium Oxide, Iron Proteinate, l-Lysine, Minderal Oil, Yucca Schidegera Extract, Choline Chloride, Manganous Oxide, Copper Proteinate, Zinc Methionine Complex, Magnesium Sulfate, Potassium Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Niacin Supplement, Artificial Flavoring, Calcium Carbonate, Biotin, Folic Acid, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin Supplement, Monocalcium Phosphate, Dicalcium Phosphate, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Cobalt Sulfate, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide.

Product Label Facts
Product Label Facts

2006 Grand Meadows Manufactured



     
    03-13-2010, 10:06 AM
  #26
Started
With theh Gro STrong you are getting more of the levels they need

Grand vit is "ok" if you are feeding another fortified feed but I am not impressed with it alone.
     
    03-13-2010, 10:20 AM
  #27
Foal
Darn it :/ I still have a lot of the Grandvite left (I bought in bulk O.o I still have about 180 days left) and sadly I am on a pretty strict budget ( haha bet you never heard that one)...Do you have any suggestions? Thanks!
     
    03-13-2010, 03:30 PM
  #28
Started
Let me work some numbers ... I hate adding too much to the ration balancers without testing the hay
     
    03-13-2010, 11:07 PM
  #29
Foal
Thank you! My head is almost mush from all the research I have been doing o.O
I will ask tomorrow and see about the hay testing. Thanks!
     
    03-13-2010, 11:44 PM
  #30
Green Broke
Dump your farrier deary, that shoe job looks terrible and very much unprofessional (most likely a self taught or a dad taught(( had one growing up , I hated it and knew they were terrible but mom didn't have a clue, his jobs looked much like that)). Here is a great barefoot site if you want to look at some photos and read up a little http://www.barefoothorse.com/
     

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