Help for mild lameness
 
 

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Help for mild lameness

This is a discussion on Help for mild lameness within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Can sore hocks results in slight lameness in front hooves
  • Heat in horses burned quarter crack

 
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    07-09-2010, 09:48 PM
  #1
Foal
Help for mild lameness

Hello! I'm waiting for a call back from either my vet or my farrier -- either would do -- but no luck so far! I need to move to a horsier area!

In the meantime, I'm wondering what might be causing my ten-year-old Thoroughbred-cross gelding's mystery lameness, and how to ease his discomfort until help arrives.

The details: He is barefoot because his hooves tend to crack around horseshoe nails. He has dry hoof walls all around and a developing quarter crack in his right fore; in the past, he has had to have cracks burned to stop them from spreading. We might need to do that again. I'm currently rubbing hoof conditioner into his hoof walls daily.

He also has chronic thrush, which is flaring up at the moment. I use a bleach solution to scrub the thrush out of his feet. And before you ask, yes, the stall is sparkling clean, and yes, I clean his feet several times a day. The thrush has always been a problem, and I'd love any advice for getting rid of it for good.

These factors don't usually make him lame, but I'm assuming they are at least playing a part in his current, mild lameness, which has been going on for about four days now. He is sore and ouchy, not limping dramatically, just reluctant to move, and I've caught him a couple of times resting front feet. There is no heat in his feet, and he does not seem to be in distress. (He's bright-eyed, eating fine, spooking randomly at the box fan as usual, lol.) What can I do to ease his discomfort till I can drag some type of professional out to help us?
     
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    07-09-2010, 10:36 PM
  #2
Weanling
Is he on pasture? Is he leaning back to rest his fronts? Could he be in a founder stance? We are seeing a lot of it here in MN this summer with the wet and very warm weather.
     
    07-09-2010, 10:39 PM
  #3
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chella    
Is he on pasture? Is he leaning back to rest his fronts? Could he be in a founder stance? We are seeing a lot of it here in MN this summer with the wet and very warm weather.
My first thought was founder, but there's no heat in the feet, and he's not in founder stance. He's just lifting one front foot to rest and then the other, and only occasionally. Mostly he's standing square, but walking ... funny. Not exactly limping, just not quite right. I took him off grain just in case. He's on thin pasture at night, not as lush as the one he just came from (we just moved), and he's in a stall during the day.
     
    07-09-2010, 10:46 PM
  #4
Weanling
Heat doesn't always show up Odd I know? Does he walk with his head down , up or normal? Bigger horses can show mild signs of it. The ponys of the world once you see signs of founder they are usually pretty bad off. How about an abcess? Do you see anywhere one would have burst out? The rocking back and forth on the fronts seems like a laminitic attack. Maybe keep him off grass and grain till the vet comes.
     
    07-09-2010, 10:51 PM
  #5
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chella    
Heat doesn't always show up Odd I know? Does he walk with his head down , up or normal? Bigger horses can show mild signs of it. The ponys of the world once you see signs of founder they are usually pretty bad off. How about an abcess? Do you see anywhere one would have burst out? The rocking back and forth on the fronts seems like a laminitic attack. Maybe keep him off grass and grain till the vet comes.
Ooh, I didn't know it could be laminitis if there's no heat. I really wish my vet was accessible. He's carrying his head at a normal height except when he refuses to go forward, and he tosses his head high as part of his skid-to-a-halt-and-refuse-to-budge routine.

No sign of abcess that I can see. The thrush is ridiculously bad in one rear hoof, but it seems like the front that he's most sore on.

Poor boy with his awful feet. Too wet on the bottom, too dry on the top, and too sore all-around. Is there a supplement or something I ought to be feeding for his dismal feet?
     
    07-09-2010, 11:11 PM
  #6
Weanling
Barefoot trimmer, Not just a regular farrier that trims with no shoes. Look up Pete Ramey on google. It will blow you away. There is Devils claw which has a natural ingredients for pain if you don't want to bute him. There is another product called remission that I have given to my horse when he had laminitis which I think helped a little. The thrush could be that the hoof is not functioning right. The grove along the frog should not be deep and natural trims with a mustang roll that decontracts the hoofs can really help.
     
    07-09-2010, 11:16 PM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chella    
Barefoot trimmer, Not just a regular farrier that trims with no shoes. Look up Pete Ramey on google. It will blow you away. There is Devils claw which has a natural ingredients for pain if you don't want to bute him. There is another product called remission that I have given to my horse when he had laminitis which I think helped a little. The thrush could be that the hoof is not functioning right. The grove along the frog should not be deep and natural trims with a mustang roll that decontracts the hoofs can really help.
That definitely sounds interesting! Thanks for the lead! Yeah, the grooves along his frog are very deep, and his frog is soft and flaky and not in good health.
     
    07-09-2010, 11:16 PM
  #8
Foal
Might be something as simple as an abscess. My mare just blew one out about a month ago and we had no idea where her lameness was coming from either. No heat, no obvious signs, just limpy lame. Just another possibility. A gram of Bute am/pm will ease the pain untill an expert can see.
     
    07-10-2010, 12:27 AM
  #9
Foal
Thanks for the help!
     
    07-11-2010, 01:21 AM
  #10
Yearling
I would use a hoof moisturizer! I use Rain Maker on my guy and saw great results:

It helps keep the hoof soft and moisturized which also can help deal with your chronic thrush issue.

Rain Maker from SmartPak Equine
     

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