Help for Wobbler's Syndrome, Anti-inflammitories?
 
 

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Help for Wobbler's Syndrome, Anti-inflammitories?

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  • Antinflamitory drugs used for equine wobblers syndrome

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    08-21-2014, 12:25 AM
  #1
Foal
Help for Wobbler's Syndrome, Anti-inflammitories?

Well summer responded okay to the DMSO but seeing as it has worn off I am beginning to think long term for her and her back issues. I guess my vet doesn't think she has Lyme or had it in the past. Will find out more later when she calls me with the results. In the mean time I am trying to come up with solutions for my girl.

Farrier will be out Saturday to put shoes on her front. He said he can get 4 nails in so he'd have to reset her in a couple weeks but she was sound with them and he recommended it.

I was wondering what you would give your horse for such a thing. I believe she may need it for a very long time and I have looked up a few. Any suggestions?
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    08-21-2014, 09:42 AM
  #2
Green Broke
----
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blacklight    
Well summer responded okay to the DMSO but seeing as it has worn off I am beginning to think long term for her and her back issues. I guess my vet doesn't think she has Lyme or had it in the past. Will find out more later when she calls me with the results. In the mean time I am trying to come up with solutions for my girl. What back issues? Injured vertebra, sacrum issues?

You would have to be sure the horse does not have any sort of metabolic issues but, I use Acti-Flex 4000 on my 28 yr old Arab whom I rescued 21 years ago with an injured vertebra. It seems to work pretty good on him but know that nothing will ever make them move 100% sound when they've got life long back issues.

ACTI FLEX 4000 SOLUTION - PROMO- GAL PLUS FREE QUART-Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supply I pay $103 at my feed store so, this is REALLY cheap plus you get a free quart.

To reiterate, metabolic horses cannot have this due to the high amount of glucosamine and also the Yucca.

Find a quality equine chiropractor/massage therapist and keep the horse limber as needed. I have averaged 2 - 4 visits annually (for 21 years) for my Arab, to keep him moving. I can tell when he needs adjusted.

I use Lybrisyn HA on my metabolic horse with hock/ankle arthritis. Lybrisyn-HA is a joint lubricant, not an anti-inflammatory.

For anti-inflammatories on my metabolic horses, 99% pure MSM works just as well as anything. I know it does bang-up job keeping the edema out of one horse's back leg; I don't know how well it works on joints.

Farrier will be out Saturday to put shoes on her front. He said he can get 4 nails in so he'd have to reset her in a couple weeks but she was sound with them and he recommended it. "he said he can get 4 nails in". Is that because her hooves are poor, because she has arthritis in her fetlocks, or both?

What kind and how hard are you riding her? JMHO but, she might be better off wearing hoof boots but she would still need trimmed frequently to stay in her boots.

I was wondering what you would give your horse for such a thing. I believe she may need it for a very long time a
Nd I have looked up a few. Any suggestions?
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Without knowing the specific back issues, my best guess is above and none of that will ever go away - she will always need some sort of joint lubricant and/or anti-inflammatory.

Hope this helps
     
    08-21-2014, 11:48 AM
  #3
Green Broke
Yes, more details would be good. What kind of back pain is your horse having? What is the CAUSE?

Has your horse been examined by a chiropractor?

As far as her feet go, does she have a separate soundness issue with her feet? What feet are affected? Did you have a lameness eval done?
walkinthewalk and HagonNag like this.
     
    08-22-2014, 01:01 AM
  #4
Foal
Ok, sorry I wasn't specific enough. Summer is my mare who has wobblers. It is most likely due to a spinal cord injury that we can only guess happened when she did something really stupid, and although she showed no signs of neurological damage at the time, she has gotten a lot worse. I have been bugging the chiro to come but she will not call me back, which, mind you, is very frustrating, because I have read acupuncture can help.

The farrier can only get 4 nails in because of a trim that was done. She was bad before the trim but at least she could canter. Now, because she's lost so much control of her hind end, she can't do more than a short trot.

Like I said, she responded well to the dex, so now I am on the hunt for a potential long-term medicine to help with what we believe is swelling of her spinal cord.

I say we, as I speak of my vet and everyone else who is aware of my girl's issues.

Thank you for the input
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    08-22-2014, 08:31 AM
  #5
Green Broke
That could be a game changer for anything I said

Wobblers is often loosely used.

Along with spinal cord damage, it can also be caused by disease. I am not familiar with how disease might enter into it.

Hopefully someone whose had a horse with Wobbler's Syndrome will come in and be a lot more help than any of us of who haven't dealt with it.

Also:

1. Google "Wobbler's Syndrome" and research the credible sites, such as universities and vets.

This is a good link for starters Equine Wobbler Syndrome-Equine Wobblers Signs Symptoms

2. Here's the link to a equine Chinese herbalist in Ocala, FL. Only a vet that has taken his courses, can prescribe these herbs. Believe me they work.

https://www.tcvmherbal.com/


Key your zip code in the green bar on the left, to see if there is someone in your area that is qualified to sell these herbs.

I've seen them work on two of my horses, one of which who is seriously insulin resistant and would have had to have been put on Thyro-L had it not been for Dr. Xie's Hot Hoof l.

Good luck to you
     
    08-22-2014, 10:22 AM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blacklight    
Like I said, she responded well to the dex, so now I am on the hunt for a potential long-term medicine to help with what we believe is swelling of her spinal cord.
Long term? Surgery, potentially. What exact diagnostic work-up has your mare gone through for your vet to determine Wobber's and spinal cord swelling (rather than compression)? Myelogram? X-rays?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blacklight    

The farrier can only get 4 nails in because of a trim that was done. She was bad before the trim but at least she could canter. Now, because she's lost so much control of her hind end, she can't do more than a short trot.
Are you still riding her?

Or just trying to get her pasture sound?

There are other options including glue-on shoes and hoof boots.
     
    08-22-2014, 10:58 AM
  #7
Foal
Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159    
Long term? Surgery, potentially. What exact diagnostic work-up has your mare gone through for your vet to determine Wobber's and spinal cord swelling (rather than compression)? Myelogram? X-rays?



Are you still riding her?

Or just trying to get her pasture sound?

There are other options including glue-on shoes and hoof boots.
She has been worked up twice. The first time it was barely noticeable and she scored 1/5 on her front and 2/5 on her back end in June. Last week she was checked again and she is 2/5 front and 3/5 back.

I use wobblers because she is certainly wobbling. She has neurological damage as diagnosed by my vet. The lumbar region of her spine is what seems affected.

I am seeking a local chiro to see if that can help. If its only a pinched nerve and a few adjustments work, fantastic. I had also heard acupuncture may help too, if there is more going on.

I was lightly riding her in July but now she is to the point that riding her is not an option. If she does not improve or gets worse within a few months, my only option will be to put her down. I am doing everything in my power to see if she can be helped before that option is my only option.
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    08-23-2014, 10:06 PM
  #8
Trained
Afraid that while 'Wobblers' can be used to indicate other issues, it is generally a serious & untreatable neurological issue. It also often gets progressively worse. As such, the best you can do is palliative care and not riding her. But I'd be working closely with a vet & *qualified* vet chiro, and seriously considering whether it's fair to keep her going. Working with your vet, who knows the horse & problem personally, they will be the best to advise which if any anti inflams or other drugs may or may not be best.

Beg your pardon, just read your last response. Fingers x'd it's a minor, treatable issue. Good you're not riding. Why do you want her shod?
     
    08-23-2014, 11:10 PM
  #9
Foal
Unfortunately the decision has been made to put my Summer down. Her condition has only gotten worse and right now, the best thing for her is to let her go. She can run like horses are supposed to with the herds in the skies. It is much harder than I first thought it would be. I am more attached to her than I let myself believe. I do not understand why my dream animal that I have wanted since a child has to be taken so soon. I will always love her and will always remember her. She was my first horse and taught me so much in our short time.
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loosie likes this.
     
    08-24-2014, 12:17 AM
  #10
Trained
Very sorry to hear Backlight. Glad you're being realistic & responsible about it.
     

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