Hoof Experts? Any idea on the problem? - Page 2
   

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Hoof Experts? Any idea on the problem?

This is a discussion on Hoof Experts? Any idea on the problem? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category

    Like Tree2Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        06-09-2013, 12:37 AM
      #11
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
    Hoof growth rate is very individual and depends on nutrition, type of ground the horse lives on, work and type of year.
    And it's not only about growth, but also wear. A horse with some conformational flaws will most likely wear his hooves unevenly and therefore needs correcting more.
    I bought a yearling once who was so correct that my farrier refused to touch his feet. They were and wore perfect until he was three and we had a very wet winter which made a little rasping necessary. Another needed trimming every three weeks, otherwise his toes would become too long, the heels underrun. He was pidgeon- toed.
    So, until we see these pics...........
    Please, if you read this before arrival of the farrier, take BEFORE trim pictures.
    Well, I didn't read this before his trimming was finished, 3ds isn't letting me post his pictures... However when he was getting his front feet trimmed the front left gave him the most trouble since it was the longest out of the other 3, his feet are trimmed he's feeling ALOT better. But as for his founder problem, that's going to take 2 hours of walking 3 times a day just for the fun of it with the extra hour. Then he grazes on the small field grass for an hour or 2 then into the pre-stalls for the same amount if not a lil longer of grazing while he has a full bucket of water and a hay bag only enough to keep him from cribbing which I will break him of. He wasn't looking forward to the 2nd hour walk before 9pm he was throwing a tantrum but knew I wasn't going to let him get away with it and followed quietly even if irritated. His first 1 hour walk he was so tired within a few hours he basked in the sunlight sleeping for a few, came back from the Texico up the road called out to him he practically jumped up giving me a happy nicker even if looking sleepy. He and his stall buddy are stalled up for tonight so there not grazing ALL night long, the foundering starts from the growing hooves then goes up to there neck making it really hard where it should be smooth and flexible, this is also from eating to much grass, being on the heavy side and lack of exercise. If the foundering gets bad enough it can block there airway and could kill them. I was fortunate to of called Judy the trimmer out when I did. She knew Ninit would ever give her so much trouble if it wasn't for the front hooves. After a few days when his feet are less "tender" like a human foot blister in a way. I'm going to saddle him up and were going to go on our nice long trail rides again. Soft hoof paddings should be helpful too, the grass isn't hard, wet, its normal with green grass. But with 2 horses in the 1 paddock it should keep them well occupied every few hours. (especially ninit)
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        06-09-2013, 01:03 AM
      #12
    Trained
    Founder doesn't block the airways and kill them. It also doesn't make the neck stiff.
    But, overweight, too much grass, too much grain, bad hoofcare, all of the above causes founder.
    I hope he has hay for the night?
    A slowfeeder would be good for when he's not on pasture. His hay will last longer, he doesn't run out, and having always a little to nibble on will avoid ulcers, and blood sugar spikes, which, just like in people with diabetes, cause metabolic problems which lead to laminitis/founder.
    Check out Slow Feeding Horses on Paddock Paradise Tracks - Paddock Paradise Wiki for different types of slowfeeders, most of them DIY even
         
        06-09-2013, 06:07 PM
      #13
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by deserthorsewoman    
    Founder doesn't block the airways and kill them. It also doesn't make the neck stiff.
    But, overweight, too much grass, too much grain, bad hoofcare, all of the above causes founder.
    I hope he has hay for the night?
    A slowfeeder would be good for when he's not on pasture. His hay will last longer, he doesn't run out, and having always a little to nibble on will avoid ulcers, and blood sugar spikes, which, just like in people with diabetes, cause metabolic problems which lead to laminitis/founder.
    Check out Slow Feeding Horses on Paddock Paradise Tracks - Paddock Paradise Wiki for different types of slowfeeders, most of them DIY even
    Foundering DOES start from the hooves and then goes to the neck after so much weight, lack of exercise, nutrition, etc. It CAN block there airways making it harder for them to breathe. And yes, Ninit and Bunny both have hay every night, not full but just 1 clump each night in there hay bags beside there water buckets. They now have shavings in there so they got a soft bedding to stand/lay in and its re-arranged to be big enough for the horses to walk around in so they won't get stoved up. Shavings for horse stalls took 10$, hay costed about the same, and there getting lunges 3 times a day to help with the weight reduce and feeling better on the foot for Ninit, when Ninit is back into shape he's going to need a smaller belly strap, right now its about the size set for a thoroughbred on races or a draft horse. Between his lunging circle area and his trail we've made in an oval of walking 3 times a day for 2 days so far it'll be a nice little paddock for breezing them out in when he starts feeling better, then after awhile its straight to gaming practice then onto the gaming events themselves. Daily hoof heal is starting to seal up the small crack he had in his left foot too. Our field is all pasture, its quite grassy so there's no other place to put them and I'm not paying to rent out a stall with its own different pasturing. He's given a salt block out in the field to help him try to not graze 24/7 as before. His apperance should look like my neighbours pure Arabian's, with a non foundered neck and better body weight. His lounges are about 30-1hr exercises between a walk, trot, and canter. These 2 horses prefer grass over hay which is why they're times are being switched between paddock time and stall time.
         
        06-09-2013, 07:13 PM
      #14
    Banned
    Founder doesn't go up to the neck it only effects hoofs you need to do some research about founder. Educate yourself on hoofs you have no clue as to what your talking about.

    To fat a horse makes for a cresty neck and cresty necked horses can founder.... so do some googling about founder. And salt won't keep them from over eating grass a muzzle will.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    I seriously just want to cry I'm so frustrated, hoof experts help :( Kymbadina Hoof Care 96 08-01-2011 07:54 AM
    Calling all hoof experts. Loosie? Ricci's hoof saga. riccil0ve Hoof Care 151 07-21-2011 04:16 AM
    horse hoof experts i need some advice reining girl Hoof Care 36 08-23-2010 11:00 PM
    Barefoot trimming - Good idea or better left to experts? HollyLolly Natural Horsemanship 28 01-19-2010 04:42 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:00 PM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0