Hoof wall seperation
   

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Hoof wall seperation

This is a discussion on Hoof wall seperation within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • How to treat hoof wall separation in horses
  • Horse hoof separation of the wall

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  • 2 Post By Kayella

 
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    09-29-2013, 02:07 PM
  #1
Weanling
Hoof wall seperation

My 11 YO appendix has notoriously bad feet and for months now we have been combating white line separation. He wears front shoes and the separation is only in his front right foot.
My farrier has been taking off whatever "dead" hoof wall is there to open it up a little and I was told to keep it clean and dry (harder than you'd think) so he's been on stall rest with minimal turnout only when its dry out with no chance of rain (rare in S.Fl. Lately)
Anyway, I went out to see him yesterday and I cleaned out his feet and, just for the hell of it, I tapped on the front of the hoof with the hoof pick like my farrier showed me and its even MORE hollow now!! I called farrier and he said that its time for 'resection' , is that just taking more hoof wall off? How much wall can he safely take off? The horse is lame at the trot (in hand) and it really scares me to keep taking more hoof wall off
     
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    09-29-2013, 02:45 PM
  #2
Weanling
I would look into getting some xrays and have the vet come out. It could be he has something more going on that what you can see. The hoof wall is par of the wall that the horse stands on. The more you take the more you need to support. Like I said you need the vet to come out and take a look.
     
    09-29-2013, 03:18 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Call a vet,
In general things don't heal unless blood flows. Feet don't get alot of blood, and even less if you keep him locked up.
I've dealt with minor issues like this by cleaning, soaking for a couple minutes with epson salt, dry it off and squirt some thrust buster in there, repeat every other day or so and let him run around.
But after the next farrier visit if it wasnt better Id be seeing a vet. Especially since it has progressed to the point of a lame horse.
     
    09-29-2013, 03:39 PM
  #4
Foal
Feel your pain...

Nikkibella,

I myself just got done dealing with this issue. My TB/Paint had a very severe case that was discovered by our vet when he was called out for Charlie's limping. The now previous farrier had been re-shoeing Charlie's front feet without ever noticing/mentioning this HUGE problem. The vet resected Charlies front right hoof, and we were set to treat all four hooves with a mixture of bleach and water, and sealing it with formaldehyde. This lasted for about 2 weeks, with another vet check to follow up. I had to keep treating the infection, however, less aggressively now. Charlie is now barefoot, and even though he has several more months before he can be considered "fully" recovered, he is going to live a much better life, WLD free. Attached is a current photo of his hoof. This is after about 3 months of healthy growth. He is a much happier horse, with now a much more competent barefoot farrier.

As a side note, my farrier had mentioned to me that the worst thing you would do for WLD is to try and treat it with chemicals intended for thrush. But I know everyone has their own methods. I wish you luck! It's a long road to recovery, but you will learn a lot, and will hopefully be able to prevent any further infection.
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File Type: jpg Charlie1.jpg (39.4 KB, 68 views)
     
    09-29-2013, 03:59 PM
  #5
Green Broke
Treating WLD is more than keeping it dry and clean. It's infected necrotic material that needs to be taken care of. It needs daily disinfecting. You'll get a lot of different opinions on what to use. I myself have had great success with Spectrasan. It's an all natural disinfectant that will kill harmful bacteria but not healthy tissue as well. I personally wouldn't use bleach. Yes it may kill the bacteria and heal eventually, but it also kills the healthy tissue that is growing and slows recovery.

Resecting may definitely be necessary if it is that severe. You've already taken part of the hoof walls purpose out of the situation by making it non-weight bearing, so it won't hurt to resect more. It will take longer to grow back, yes, but it will make recovery easier as you'll be able to cut out all necrotic tissue and be able to treat the infection and keep it from spreading.
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    09-29-2013, 05:37 PM
  #6
Weanling
So by taking more good wall off it will help to fix the problem faster ? And it will not hurt him to be walking on this 'jacked up' foot because he is wearing shoes which holds his weight , correct?
Also , what would you suggest using on his foot to kill the infection ? Or nothing at all?
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    09-30-2013, 12:58 AM
  #7
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nikkibella    
My 11 YO appendix has notoriously bad feet and for months now we have been combating white line separation. He wears front shoes and the separation is only in his front right foot.
Yep, separation/seedy toe/WLD tends to be a common symptom of 'notoriously bad feet'. There's generally more to it than 'just' seedy toe infection - generally bad mechanics are at the route, which allow the feet to become separated & then get infected. While it can be really difficult if the horse is in a bad environment, and keeping the horse shod can make it(& the mechanics that allowed it) harder to treat, if you've been battling already for months, to no avail, something's not right IME.

Quote:
I called farrier and he said that its time for 'resection' , is that just taking more hoof wall off? How much wall can he safely take off? The horse is lame at the trot (in hand)
Is the horse actually lame because of the infection do you think? That's an indication that it's pretty severe & I would be very concerned that it's got to that point. If not treated effectively, infection can actually even eat into live tissue & bone. I would be involving a vet, if you haven't already. How long has he been lame & if not due to WLD, what has been the diagnosis?

Yes, unless the horse is in an ideal environment & the infection is very superficial, the owner very diligent with ongoing treatment, etc, I consider resecting generally necessary. As little as possible, but as much as necessary, to remove all infected material if possible(not if it goes into live tissue though). It's an insidious disease that can eat away at healthy tissue quicker than it can grow & gets in deep, so it's not able to be treated topically without being cleaned out. I would have done this to begin with, not leave it until the problem became worse.

As for how much, you can take away most of the hoof wall if necessary. That is only needed in really severe cases. Obviously if so, the horse couldn't be shod(I wouldn't have him shod until this is treated anyway) and would need protection from bashing his foot, with the sensitive corium so close to the surface. Generally only relatively small areas need to be removed & if the resect goes more than half way up the wall a brace across the face of the cut may be needed.

Quote:
The hoof wall is par of the wall that the horse stands on. The more you take the more you need to support.
The hoof shouldn't be peripherally loaded - bearing most of the weight on hoof walls, and this is one common reason for stretching/separation, and the biggest reason I'd be avoiding conventional rims, at least until his feet were healthy.

Quote:
As a side note, my farrier had mentioned to me that the worst thing you would do for WLD is to try and treat it with chemicals intended for thrush.
Thrush & WLD/seedy are basically the same sort of infection in different parts of the foot. Therefore the same antiseptics should kill both. **So long as** it is not applied anywhere near sensitive tissue, it shouldn't be problematic to use heavy duty chemicals on hoof wall infection. So saying, I wouldn't let something like formaldehyde or bleach anywhere near a seriously resected hoof - it's usually far too close to live tissue that it can damage. But I don't like to use anything harsh on frogs, particularly in the central sulcus, where there is so much sensitive tissue, sensory perceptors, etc. So... I'd potentially use something like thrushbuster on WLD but not thrush.

Quote:
And it will not hurt him to be walking on this 'jacked up' foot because he is wearing shoes which holds his weight , correct?
Also , what would you suggest using on his foot to kill the infection ? Or nothing at all?
I don't understand why his hoof should be 'jacked up'? Yes, IME using conventional peripheral loading rims on a horse with stretched, separated walls & forcing those damaged walls to take the entire load is indeed going to do further harm. If the foot also needs substantial resecting, the wall that is left will also be under more strain, as there's less to spread the load.

There have been a few suggestions & you definitely need to treat it diligently - if he hasn't been treated in between farrier visits, then regardless of how good the farrier did, unless conditions are ideal, it will be pretty much untreatable. So, if after resecting there is a fair amount of hoof wall left, I'd attack it with something pretty heavy duty, but if it's into/close to sensitive tissue, I'd stick to something like diluted t-tree, salt, manuka honey, etc.
     
    09-30-2013, 11:57 AM
  #8
Super Moderator
Your not taking 'good' hoof wall off. You are taking off all bad (separated) hoof wall up to where it is good. You cannot get it to clear up until all of the diseased wall has been taken off.

Our horse shoeing school near here treats most of the WLD. They use a Dremel Rotary Tool to grind it off until they hit good hoof. Frequently, that only leaves the heels that are healthy with hoof wall going all the way to the ground. They usually put on shoes using heel and second nail holes only until the hoof starts growing down healthy and the horse can get around barefoot.

A shoe put on backwards can work very well to adjust the weight back to the healthy part of the hoof and take all of the load off of any thinned or weakened wall in the front.
     
    09-30-2013, 01:13 PM
  #9
Weanling
I'll try to get pictures today of his foot and where more wall needs to be taken off.
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