Horse that chews on everything!
 
 

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Horse that chews on everything!

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  • Horse that chews on everything
  • Horses who chew everything

 
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    06-10-2008, 10:36 AM
  #1
Foal
Horse that chews on everything!

I have a 20 yr old apaloosa mare that I bought just a few months ago. She is a very good horse besides the fact that she will chew on anything. Metal fences, wood fences, my father-in-laws hood on his truck! I have never seen a horse that cribs this bad. I know that if they are in need of supplements they will crib but she has had salt and mineral blocks the whole time we have had her. I am just curious if something could be wrong with her because she will stand for hours cribbing, I am worried about her health. I am pretty sure she is bred and I want her to be healthy. Anyone who might have any advice please I would really appreciate it. Thanks alot
     
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    06-10-2008, 12:23 PM
  #2
Foal
Heres an article I found on horse cribbing. I used to have an arab that cribbed, and the cribbing collar we put on him worked wonders, just keep a close eye so that it doesnt get snagged on anything!
http://www.alphahorse.com/horse-cribbing.html
     
    06-10-2008, 01:02 PM
  #3
Weanling
We have two cribbing horses. I wouldn't worry too much that something is wrong with her if she's healthy in other respects, some horses just crib for the high.

You can try the collar suggested, and there are also feed through supplements and pastes to put on the surfaces she cribs. I've also heard a paste of cayenne pepper can be put on the surfaces to discourage her. The major danger with cribbing is that she will wear her teeth down too much doing it..
     
    06-11-2008, 10:47 AM
  #4
Foal
Thanks

Thanks alot I will try a few different things and see what works.
     
    06-11-2008, 11:06 AM
  #5
Banned
A cribber will always crib, I'm sorry to say, as long as they have something to crib on. There are ways to stop them from cribbing though.
Putting the hot wire (or whatever is the "right term" for it) and fence your app in with that. Removing any wood, metal, plastic, from their pasture.

Putting hot wire just on the top of the fence won't work because they will crib on the bottom of it...any thing they can get their teeth on they will crib. Hehe.

There was a study that showed that sweet feed makes a horse want to crib more so if your feeding the horse sweet feed, I'd probably take that off her diet.

Also cribbing (from what I've heard) is hereditaty...they actually inheirit it from a parent or some relative. (but I could be wrong on that not sure how accurate it is)
     
    06-11-2008, 11:14 AM
  #6
Yearling
Provideing free choice forage may help, a cribbing collar may help, getting her checked for ulcers and treating if they are found may help.

But check this out:
http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle....99&kw=cribbing
     
    06-11-2008, 12:48 PM
  #7
Weanling
If she's that adamant about chewing, I'm going to say you'll probably just have to learn to live with it to some degree. Its a hard habit to break in any horse, but at that age and level of determination...good luck. LOL

There's an intresting article online at The Horse .com
http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=11999 about cribbing . It's about how the brains of cribbers are actually different from normal horses. Intresting read.
     
    06-12-2008, 03:21 AM
  #8
Weanling
Hehe, BFH...same article Ryle posted.

It is really interesting, tho. I wonder how the environment is "unsuitable" to cribbers while other horses in the same situation wouldn't crib...and what could be changed to make it so.
     
    06-12-2008, 06:23 AM
  #9
Showing
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryle
Provideing free choice forage may help, a cribbing collar may help, getting her checked for ulcers and treating if they are found may help.

But check this out:
http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle....99&kw=cribbing
I just read that article yesterday Ryle. It was very interesting that the research they are doing is leaning toward dopamine levels in the brain. If you haven't yet, read that article JNS.

Time for Prozac for horses?
     
    06-12-2008, 07:08 AM
  #10
Trained
Could it be boredom? I've heard that some bored/lonely horses like to chew.
     

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