Horse Crookedness - Page 2 - The Horse Forum
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post #11 of 27 Old 02-25-2013, 10:57 PM Thread Starter
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Haha! They certainly are cheeky lol!

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post #12 of 27 Old 02-25-2013, 11:06 PM
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That is puzzling. I think JS' advice is good. Some manual stretching might be beneficial too. The horses I ride seem to like it, Brown always leans back against the stretch if we aren't doing enough. : p. Not like an "omg panic!" But an... "This feels good, imma just stretch a liiiiittle bit more". Lots of licking afterwards.

Only problem with that is over stretching.
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post #13 of 27 Old 02-25-2013, 11:14 PM
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To me, it almost seems like part of the reason he is doing that funny neck thing is to look at you and try to stop (I assume you teach your horse to stop facing you and turn?). It is clear that he doesn't like to move on that side, and is even a hint lame to my eye (unless that is him trying to pick up a lope).

I agree that doing carrot stretches and leg stretches daily might help in addition to the chiro. I'm surprised-- your chiro didn't give you any "homework" to do with him?

ETA... on the "bad side" video, he is stepping short on his outside hind in addition to the head bobbing. He seems to be in pain, to me (from this video alone).

Last edited by existentialpony; 02-25-2013 at 11:20 PM.
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post #14 of 27 Old 02-25-2013, 11:19 PM Thread Starter
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existentialpony - Like i said, he was dumped on me, i haven't had a chance to teach him anything but he has done it since i have had him, no my chiro told me to ride him out a bit, get him flexing and stretching, but that's it. I was just wondering if there where more therapeutic was aswell. I was thinking maybe his hooves are unbalanced, they are all oddly shaped and have been neglected long term, it's been a slow process bringing him back up to scratch, he was a bit under weight when i got him, i couldn't catch him for the first 3 months, he was in a 12 or so acre paddock where he could gallop circles around me, took me weeks to con him into believing im not a danger zone. So from then on, it's a gamble wheather or not he wants to be caught, the smaller paddock i have has a sick horse in it so he cant be in there for those reasons.

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post #15 of 27 Old 02-25-2013, 11:24 PM
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That does seem to be a big load. Have you had a vet out at all? I think maybe it would be good to have an examination and make sure its not lameness, and then maybe a farrier out to see if anything corrective can be done?

Also, after stretching and stuff, do you walk him out?
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post #16 of 27 Old 02-25-2013, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Savvy Debonair View Post
existentialpony - Like i said, he was dumped on me, i haven't had a chance to teach him anything but he has done it since i have had him, no my chiro told me to ride him out a bit, get him flexing and stretching, but that's it. I was just wondering if there where more therapeutic was aswell. I was thinking maybe his hooves are unbalanced, they are all oddly shaped and have been neglected long term, it's been a slow process bringing him back up to scratch, he was a bit under weight when i got him, i couldn't catch him for the first 3 months, he was in a 12 or so acre paddock where he could gallop circles around me, took me weeks to con him into believing im not a danger zone. So from then on, it's a gamble wheather or not he wants to be caught, the smaller paddock i have has a sick horse in it so he cant be in there for those reasons.
Aw, well good on you for taking him in.

If you can, a vet visit might do him some good! At least to narrow down whether it's a skeletal/muscle issue, lameness or neurological. Just curious--do you have him on any kind of ration balancer or supplements?
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post #17 of 27 Old 02-25-2013, 11:33 PM
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JS gave you some very good advice.

I too, would be working him under saddle as lunging him in a rope halter isn't doing anyone any favours.
Work him straight and forwards. Make sure that you do not avoid his 'bad' side. So many people do more work on the good side, and the bad side become worse as a result. Bring him onto some nice wide circles, and gently start to play him off your inside leg on each rein. Don't worry about where his head is, just his body at this point.

Basically, you can massage, chiro, vet and 'fancy voodoo remedy' him all you like, but if you're not working him straight to build up those muscles, you'll be throwing your money away.

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post #18 of 27 Old 02-26-2013, 08:04 AM Thread Starter
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The vet i had out couldn't pick up anything and sound he is sound. The vet said he's just jumpy from being let go and maybe beaten by previous owners.

I currently don't have him on any feed of any type, he's just been spelling in a ig paddock, letting him gain some weight and settle down, I just wanted some advice before bringing him in, my instructor was next to useless, just wanted me to teach him one rein stops for weeks which i don't agree on, he knows how to do that.

Thanks Kayty, time is coming close for him to be brought out of chill time haha

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post #19 of 27 Old 02-26-2013, 08:10 AM
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I have not read the entire thread....but, agree with keeping up the Chiro-our Chiro also uses hot packs on the areas that are stiff prior to working to loosen them up......I haven't made any in a couple of years, but may start up again if there is an interest-basically similar to the sand ones you use on humans that you microwave, and put in a fleece liner, and put on the horse for about 20 minutes. It does help.

My other question is-do you know if this was a race horse? They work them totally differently on the track-basically one way. That may explain some of it.

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post #20 of 27 Old 02-26-2013, 08:32 AM
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As I watch his ears and his posture he's looking for the door ie. he'd much rather be elsewhere. The knotted halter will keep his head toward you as he moves his hips farther out. When you go to catch this horse, circle way around behind him, trying not to look at him. Focus on something to the side and behind. Line your self up directly behind him well out of kicking range and with as little energy as possible make him move and go stand where he was eating. Carry the halter and lead where he can easily see it, in your left elbow or shoulder. Continue to move him until he watches you with both eyes. Stand still. If he looks to his left, turn your head and look in the opposite direction. This will bring him back. If he starts to walk away you must immediately walk in the opposite direction. If you hesitate he'll think it's his idea. When he stops walking circle around again. He'll get so he'll keep his eyes glued to you and it will get harder to get behind him. When this point arrives, remain in front of him, slump your shoulders down and extend your right hand, fingers turned down (horse greeting) If he doesn't approach, back up a few steps and walk away. Just relax with your back to him. He may chose this time to approach you. If so, don't touch him. If he wants to check you out, let him. Then leave the pasture. If he follows, great, but ignore him. No talking no touching. You've just established a stronger relationship with him. Walking away has taken all pressure of him. Give him a bit of a break then repeat the exercise. If he touches your hand, back up a few steps, turn and walk away a few steps, same as before. Don't rush this as it's time well spent. He's also learning to trust you. Never ever run after him as it turns it into great sport for him. In a herd, horses rarely run at another but will approach another with ears pinned which tell the other to move or suffer my wrath. As long as that horse moves only a few strides, the dominant will leave it alone.
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