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Horse not drinking

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  • Horses that aren't drinking water
  • Horse not drinking after teeth

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    12-26-2012, 12:16 PM
  #21
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by poppy1356    
She did drink the whole bucket last night. It is the large buckets but you can still carry them, it is 20qts.

She gets 4oz of oil in her feed also, so would that help? There is tons of oil around, mineral oil though I don't think we have.
If (emphasize "if") she has had been partially blocked you would be able to tell she had "cleared" by watching her drink (I count ear "strokes" ... I feel "safe" at 6). With a partial block they will only drink a little, and it will "seep" around the impaction. They often clear on their own, but it has been my experience that if they get fully or partially blocked once, they are prone to do it again. If they get blocked, getting mineral oil down them can help clear it...as in forcing it down them the way you do w wormer, sometimes it will require a vet to tube them. Like I said, USP grade mineral oil is cheap, cheap and should be in your med kit. It does not go bad.

BTW, they tend to not eat if they are blocked.
     
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    12-26-2012, 12:21 PM
  #22
Green Broke
Does their tummy still make lots of noise if there is a blockage? Yesterday when I was there her tummy was making all it's usual sounds which sound like a dinosaur.

Does mineral oil freeze? Because while the stalls haven't dipped below freezing the back grain room has. My wheat germ oil looks like baby poo, it's gross lol.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:22 PM
  #23
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by poppy1356    
Please show me a link to where it says beet pulp will dehydrate a horse. All I can find says that is not true. Dry beet pulp can cause choke but plenty of horses eat dry beet pulp without issue. I add water so it is not dry but I am not about to let it soak all day.
I can't find anything right now about the dehydration issue, but it is a common myth that the beet pulp will swell up and make the horse explode. That's not at all what I'm talking about, just to make sure.

What I know has come from talking to vets about properly feeding beet pulp, particularly to endurance horses. We use the beet pulp for its ability to hydrate the horse and keep them hydrated for a longer period of time than just drinking the water straight, which is why it's so critical to make sure the beet pulp is soaked all the way through.

In normal circumstances, where the horse is not going to be going 25-100 miles in a short period of time, I would imagine it wouldn't cause too much of an issue to feed it dry since the horse will have plenty of opportunity to drink water when it's thirsty and won't be sweating it all out of him. However, if it is a horse already having drinking issues, I could see the beet pulp causing more issues if it isn't saturated since it will continue to soak up the water from the horse.

If beet pulp can soak up water, it will, whether it's water you're adding to it before being fed or water from the horse after it's fed.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:24 PM
  #24
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by poppy1356    
Please show me a link to where it says beet pulp will dehydrate a horse. All I can find says that is not true. Dry beet pulp can cause choke but plenty of horses eat dry beet pulp without issue. I add water so it is not dry but I am not about to let it soak all day.
I get the shredded pulp and it only takes about 45 minutes in warm water to "swell" to its "max". I accidently bought pellets once...I returned them (unopened) b/c it takes forever (according to the recommended use). My only complaint w the shredded is it has molasses to keep the dust down...I would prefer it did not, but can't have everything.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:29 PM
  #25
Yearling
Ok, I'm getting some links for you...

This one is from http://distanceriding.org/index2.php...do_pdf=1&id=35

It's long, so I copied and pasted the parts relevant to this conversation. While it does say it's unnecessary to soak beet pulp, it points out that horses will generally drink enough water to properly digest it. However, it doesn't address when horses aren't drinking enough water, as seemed to be your case. It also says it often takes 3-4 hours to soak beet pulp, which is what I've found with my horses. Here's the quote:

Assuming free access to water, horses will voluntarily drink
Enough water to adequately process any amount of beet pulp consumed (1.5 to 2 litres per pound of beet pulp).

...

Although soaking beet pulp is not necessary,
There are several good reasons for wetting it down before you feed it. Soaking beet pulp may make the feed easier to chew, particularly for older horses with bad teeth. Soaked beet pulp may also be more tasty and it provides a useful method for hiding minerals or medications. If your horse gobbles down his feed or is prone to choke, it might be a good
Idea to soak your beet pulp. And while horses will drink water on their own, pre-soaked beet pulp is a good way to get
Some water into your horses, particularly in the winter when they may not be as inclined to drink what they need. So, if
Soaking beet pulp fits into your feeding management, by all means, do it. You don't have to soak beet pulp overnightmost of the expansion takes place within the first 3 to 4 hours.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:32 PM
  #26
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by poppy1356    
Does their tummy still make lots of noise if there is a blockage? Yesterday when I was there her tummy was making all it's usual sounds which sound like a dinosaur.

Does mineral oil freeze? Because while the stalls haven't dipped below freezing the back grain room has. My wheat germ oil looks like baby poo, it's gross lol.
If she is/was eating normally, it is unlikely she was blocked. But, yes, their stomack noises will remain normal for the most part if the block is in their "throat" - ordinarily at the very base of their neck where the "throat" muscels end and can't move the balled up food along. A blockage anywhere else will often stop/slow healthy tummy sounds.

I don't know what mineral oil's freezing point is, but I have never personally seen it solidify.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:33 PM
  #27
Trained
This article also addressed the need to soak beet pulp.

"if you feed it to a horse dry, it will swell up after it is eaten and cause choke or colic"

It goes on to say that this is not really all that well documented. It is logical to assume that anything that absorbs that much water is going to absorb it either before you put it in the horse or after you put it in the horse. If it is absorbed in the horse, the water has to come from somewhere, thus the worry about dehydration.

Feeding Beet Pulp to Horses
jaydee likes this.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:36 PM
  #28
Green Broke
Concerns about beet pulp "pulling water from the blood and into the stomach and causing
dehydration" are also unfounded. Regardless of the type of feed, horses will generally drink
approximately 3 to 4 liters of water for every kilogram of dry matter consumed (dry matter is
what's left over in a feed after its own moisture content is disallowed). Assuming free access to
clean, fresh water, horses will voluntarily consume enough water to adequately process any
amount of beet pulp consumed. If soaked beet pulp is provided, drinking will be proportionately
less as the moisture content of the soaked pulp supplies considerable water. In either case, it is
unlikely that fluid shifts from blood plasma to the interior of the gastrointestinal tract will be
significantly different from those occurring with any other type of feed with similar moisture
content.

Susan E. Garlinghouse, DVM horse management articles and lectures Under Myths and Realities of beet pulp.

Beginning and end of it is I will not soak this darned stuff for hours, I have no reason to waste it. It is not cheap, my horse will not eat it then. She will not get the shreds that have molasses. I have asked my vet about this before. Water is added to it but left to long it will waste then I am not only wasting beet pulp but all her supplements too.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:38 PM
  #29
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missy May    
If she is/was eating normally, it is unlikely she was blocked. But, yes, their stomack noises will remain normal for the most part if the block is in their "throat" - ordinarily at the very base of their neck where the "throat" muscels end and can't move the balled up food along. A blockage anywhere else will often stop/slow healthy tummy sounds.

I don't know what mineral oil's freezing point is, but I have never personally seen it solidify.

Thank you. I check her over daily, run my hands all over to make sure there isn't any swelling or any cuts or anything out of the ordinary so I would have noticed a lump in her throat.
     
    12-26-2012, 12:45 PM
  #30
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by poppy1356    
Concerns about beet pulp "pulling water from the blood and into the stomach and causing
dehydration" are also unfounded. Regardless of the type of feed, horses will generally drink
approximately 3 to 4 liters of water for every kilogram of dry matter consumed (dry matter is
what's left over in a feed after its own moisture content is disallowed). Assuming free access to
clean, fresh water, horses will voluntarily consume enough water to adequately process any
amount of beet pulp consumed. If soaked beet pulp is provided, drinking will be proportionately
less as the moisture content of the soaked pulp supplies considerable water. In either case, it is
unlikely that fluid shifts from blood plasma to the interior of the gastrointestinal tract will be
significantly different from those occurring with any other type of feed with similar moisture
content.

Susan E. Garlinghouse, DVM horse management articles and lectures Under Myths and Realities of beet pulp.

Beginning and end of it is I will not soak this darned stuff for hours, I have no reason to waste it. It is not cheap, my horse will not eat it then. She will not get the shreds that have molasses. I have asked my vet about this before. Water is added to it but left to long it will waste then I am not only wasting beet pulp but all her supplements too.
If you're not feeding pellets, it doesn't need to be soaked for hours.
All of these articles assume your horse is drinking normally, in which case feeding beet pulp will not dehydrate the horse. Since there is enough water going in, it will not change the amount of fluid in the blood, stool, or whatever. However, if there's dry beet pulp going in and soaking up water, but there is no more water going in (as seemed to be the case with your horse), then I would be worried about dehydration. All of these articles deal with NORMAL water intake and exertion, which is not the case when your horse is refusing to drink, or, in my case, when the horse is working hard enough to need extra. If your horse is drinking and you don't worry about choke (which I'm glad I now know much more about), then by all means do it. I just merely was concerned when your horse wasn't drinking AND was being fed what sounds like nearly-dry beet pulp.
     

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