Horse standing with back legs up under him? - The Horse Forum

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post #1 of 12 Old 08-13-2008, 07:58 AM Thread Starter
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Horse standing with back legs up under him?

Someone had once said something about why a horse would stand with his back legs up under his body. What would that be a sympton of? Is it because he doesn't want to support as much weight with his back legs, so is compensating?

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post #2 of 12 Old 08-13-2008, 08:28 AM
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I would tend to think that a horse putting hind legs further under his body would be because he wants to put more weight on them, not less. I'd say its a problem with the front legs so he wants to use his hind legs for the majority of the weight bearing. Perhaps a symptom of founder or the multitude of other lameness issues arising from the front legs!

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post #3 of 12 Old 08-13-2008, 08:41 AM Thread Starter
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I don't know. His front legs seem fine to me, but I have noticed him resting his back feet a lot this past week. He is also touchy when I pick his back hooves, but not his front. He was touchy about his back hooves when I first got him---some lady had bought him before me, and had him for four months. She didn't feed him right, and he dropped about 100 lbs! Her kids had also been allowed to mess with him, and were pulling his ears, and he was touchy about his ears for awhile, too. He now lets me do anything with his head, and he had been a lot better about his feet---I guess she didn't treat him right in that area either. He's come a long way in two months, and is such a sweet horse. Why do so many people mistreat these animals?

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post #4 of 12 Old 08-13-2008, 12:57 PM
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My appy used to stand that way. Once he was being trimmed correctly he stopped doing it. So, I'd say it's hoof pain most likely. May or may not be a big deal. The right trim may help tho. Finding someone who can do that is the trick. ;)
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post #5 of 12 Old 08-13-2008, 03:49 PM Thread Starter
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I was thinking that he was doing it because it is a little past time for a trim. I really only see him do it when I pick his front hooves. Hopefully I can get a farrier out in the next couple of days! The guy who was supposed to come a couple of weeks ago didn't show up, and I've been very busy since. I wish people would be more dependable.

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post #6 of 12 Old 08-13-2008, 03:50 PM Thread Starter
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I was thinking that he was doing it because it is a little past time for a trim. I really only see him do it when I pick his front hooves. Hopefully I can get a farrier out in the next couple of days! The guy who was supposed to come a couple of weeks ago didn't show up, and I've been very busy since. I wish people would be more dependable.

Everything can be achieved through patience!

I'd rather have a problem horse than a problem man. The horse I can work with. The man---I cannot help!
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post #7 of 12 Old 08-15-2008, 11:40 AM
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That's also the classic sign of laminitis/founder in the front feet. Can you feel any digital pulse in the front feet?

They are trying to take the weight of the front feet to ease pain.
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post #8 of 12 Old 08-15-2008, 05:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G&K's Mom
That's also the classic sign of laminitis/founder in the front feet. Can you feel any digital pulse in the front feet?

They are trying to take the weight of the front feet to ease pain.
That was my first thought, too :(
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post #9 of 12 Old 08-18-2008, 11:51 AM
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Standing with back feet up under them is a way of taking some of the weight off of the front end. The fact that he doesn't want his back feet messed with could also be from not wanting to put more weight on his front end. This could be a symptom of laminitis or some other pain issue--either way, you should have your vet out for an exam to pinpoint the problem.

Cindy D.
Licensed Veterinary Technician
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post #10 of 12 Old 08-26-2008, 08:12 PM
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One of my horses does that when the farrier does his front feet---he puts his rear feet way underneath him, like in the center of his abdomen. The farrier said his back was sore. I have had the chiropractor out twice this month and she agreed, but said he also has sore hocks. She adjusted him and did acupuncture on him and he is improved. Standing with the hind legs far underneath them usually indicates back pain. Standing with the front legs outstretched in front of them indicates laminitis/founder.
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