Horses Laying Down, how long??
 
 

       The Horse Forum > Keeping and Caring for Horses > Horse Health

Horses Laying Down, how long??

This is a discussion on Horses Laying Down, how long?? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Y do horses lay down
  • Google why do horses lay down

 
LinkBack Thread Tools
    05-19-2011, 10:21 AM
  #1
Foal
Horses Laying Down, how long??

I'm just curious on your input on the question, how long can horses safely lay down? Here's is what I have learned from research and people who know what they're talking about who I know personally:

Horses that stay in stalls 24/7 lay down much less often because they're more insecure
Horses need to sleep laying down to get REM sleep, they requires 1-2 hours of REM sleep every few days or they'll get sleep deprived
Horses KNOW when to get up, lol.. unless cast, they will stand up before their organs get impacted or their lungs fill with fluids
Horses at pasture and in herds lay down more often due to the feeling of safety
If they're rolling, thrashing, sweating, panting, biting at abs, obviously, something's wrong, most likely colic

My question is how long can they lay. I have heard paranoid people say 20-30 min or "they'll colic and die". Bear in mind, these same people see a horse laying down and IMMEDIATELY run up and kick the stall door or run at them to scare them and wake them up, and claim if a person doens't get them up, they'll forget to stand up and colic and die.. LOL...

But more realistically I know people who say their horses are lazy and will lay 1-2 hours straight on a given day, or on lazy days, and they haven't coliced (how do you spell coliced?)... nor have they even had to see a vet in over a decade. And I READ online that it takes like 6 hours for their lungs to fill up with fluids. So is that time-frame true? And how long does it take for organ damage due to pressure to start becoming a problem?
     
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
    05-19-2011, 11:54 AM
  #2
mls
Trained
You have 'heard' a lot and 'know' a lot of people. But where is your research and facts?

In fact what is your experience with horses at all?
     
    05-19-2011, 12:01 PM
  #3
Banned
Quote:
Originally Posted by mls    
You have 'heard' a lot and 'know' a lot of people. But where is your research and facts?
My thoughts exactly!

The only people I have heard anything like you claim to hear (horses should not lay down and horses being insecure in stalls) are from people who really do not know what they are talking about. Novice lesson riding people who read the black stallion and black beauty and think they know all there is to know, basically.

I have boarded at barns with zero turn out and I have never noticed a problem with horses being insecure in their stalls. (And yes, there are horses who do not like stalls in the world, I know this.)

I know more horses that will not pee outside their stall than I know horses that are insecure inside their stall.


I will have to tell my group that they are no longer allowed to roll in the sand every day. Rolling is bad.
     
    05-19-2011, 12:13 PM
  #4
Foal
[QUOTE=DarkHorseDream;1040065]I'm just curious on your input on the question, how long can horses safely lay down? Here's is what I have learned from research and people who know what they're talking about who I know personally:

Horses that stay in stalls 24/7 lay down much less often because they're more insecure
Not in my experience at all. I bring horses in for the day in summer and all of them, without fail, lie down within half an hour, and will lie down periodically throughout the day.

Horses need to sleep laying down to get REM sleep, they requires 1-2 hours of REM sleep every few days or they'll get sleep deprived
Horses KNOW when to get up, lol.. unless cast, they will stand up before their organs get impacted or their lungs fill with fluids
Don't all sentient beings move automatically when a position becomes uncomfortable? I don't believe that a horse knows it should move because of it's lungs filling up, they don't have that kind of awareness, and that would have to be for an extended period of time anyway in which case the horse would be ill, or unable to move (as you say)

Horses at pasture and in herds lay down more often due to the feeling of safety
Surely that depends on the situation, whether a horse is comfortable in it's group, by itself, what the pasture is like, where it is, all kinds of factors.

If they're rolling, thrashing, sweating, panting, biting at abs, obviously, something's wrong, most likely colic

My question is how long can they lay.
As long as they like, I have seen horses down for an hour or so, usually shorter periods, but I don't hang around for hours at night time so I don't know if mine all crash out for longer.

I have heard paranoid people say 20-30 min or "they'll colic and die". Bear in mind, these same people see a horse laying down and IMMEDIATELY run up and kick the stall door or run at them to scare them and wake them up,
Glad I am not a horse in their barn then, I'd be a nervous wreck and worried about ever lying down at all

And claim if a person doens't get them up, they'll forget to stand up and colic and die.. LOL...
OK. Bit of misinformation going on there I feel.

But more realistically I know people who say their horses are lazy and will lay 1-2 hours straight on a given day, or on lazy days, and they haven't coliced (how do you spell coliced?)... nor have they even had to see a vet in over a decade. And I READ online that it takes like 6 hours for their lungs to fill up with fluids. So is that time-frame true?
I have no idea

And how long does it take for organ damage due to pressure to start becoming a problem?]
Again, I have no idea, but now would probably be a good time to try to find out...a quick Google finds this



http://www.saveyourhorse.com/morecast.html

A quote from the above, referring to cast horses in particular:

[Horses are not designed to spend much time lying down. In the wild, a downed horse is a dead horse. The sheer weight of that large body can cause problems with circulation, just like what happens to us if we spend the night lying on an arm. It falls asleep. The pressure on internal organs makes it difficult to breathe properly after time.

For all that horses are big and strong, they have very delicate digestive systems and respiratory systems. The blood flow to the legs would also be compromised since they would be up in the air and gravity would be at work, pulling the blood back into the core.

While rumor has it that the lungs will fill up with blood, they don't. They do, however, fill with fluid after a couple hours. It's called edema. Edema is swelling resulting from a buildup of fluid in tissue. In the case of pulmonary edema, it's the accumulation of fluid in the lungs.]
     
    05-19-2011, 12:18 PM
  #5
Trained
Unless something is wrong, I'll let my horses lay out in the sun as long as they please. And by something wrong, I mean distress or a pre-existing issue. It's absurd to scare a horse up and awake. Ask those people how they would like it if you barged into their room when they were sleeping yelling, "fire!" or some such.

I think when a horse gets up is more based on them being prey animals who do not normally stay in the same place for long. Plus, they only need a couple hours of REM.

Where a horse is more comfortable is an individual preference. If a horse is picked on during turnout, it will probably be more comfortable laying down in its stall. If the horse is claustrophobic, for lack of a better term, they will probably wait for turnout to lay down.

Also, tell these crazy "know everything" people to read Seabiscuit. That horse sprawled out on his side and slept for hours daily. Obviously, it had no ill affect on him.
     
    05-19-2011, 12:58 PM
  #6
Showing
My horses can sleep out there for an hour, even longer. Especially when it's nice, warm, sunny, and no flies.

BTW I disagree with the statement about laying less in stall. Again both my horses sleep there all night long (when I stall them) with no issues (can tell that by the amount on shavings on them from top to the bottom).
     
    05-19-2011, 01:09 PM
  #7
Foal
I'm real flattered that such knowledgeable people such as yourselves took the time to respond to my question with "you don't know anything about horses, your research is from green riders who got their facts from black beauty, and you're an idiot", when it was just a question.
     
    05-19-2011, 01:12 PM
  #8
Showing
My horses, JJ especially, make most of your statements a lie.

Mine sleep lying down regardless of where they are, stalled or outside. All of them lie down for quite awhile, and JJ lays flat out, snoring away for hours.

Haven't had any trouble with edema or their lungs filling with fluid. Sounds like a bunch of hogwash by someone who doesn't know or understand horses very well, but thinks they do. Kind of in the same vein as thinking that tight stirrups are better than loose ones.
     
    05-19-2011, 01:12 PM
  #9
Trained
And replying in such a way is productive how? You did get answers, perhaps focus on those and not the other unproductive posts.
     
    05-19-2011, 01:14 PM
  #10
Yearling
Swoop lays down for a nap almost every day around the same time. I have seen him take naps on nice sunny days for up to 3hrs before and he has never had a problem
     

Quick Reply
Please help keep the Horse Forum enjoyable by reporting rude posts.
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the The Horse Forum forums, you must first register.

Already have a Horse Forum account?
Members are allowed only one account per person at the Horse Forum, so if you've made an account here in the past you'll need to continue using that account. Please do not create a new account or you may lose access to the Horse Forum. If you need help recovering your existing account, please Contact Us. We'll be glad to help!

New to the Horse Forum?
Please choose a username you will be satisfied with using for the duration of your membership at the Horse Forum. We do not change members' usernames upon request because that would make it difficult for everyone to keep track of who is who on the forum. For that reason, please do not incorporate your horse's name into your username so that you are not stuck with a username related to a horse you may no longer have some day, or use any other username you may no longer identify with or care for in the future.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Old Thread Warning
This thread is more than 90 days old. When a thread is this old, it is often better to start a new thread rather than post to it. However, If you feel you have something of value to add to this particular thread, you can do so by checking the box below before submitting your post.

Thread Tools

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
how long does your horses shoe last? down2earth1928 Trail Riding 22 02-02-2011 03:16 PM
Are all horses like this, or have we just had some really bad apples? (It's long) poultrygirl Horse Riding 17 09-13-2010 08:55 PM
How long can horses lie down? squeak351 Horse Health 13 07-06-2010 09:25 PM
Hauling horses over long distances... mammakatja Horse Health 14 12-11-2009 11:27 AM
How long does it take for a horses sole to thicken? prbygenny Horse Health 14 01-08-2009 09:15 PM



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:42 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0