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Horses and lighting strikes

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  • Lightning strikes horses

 
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    09-01-2012, 05:37 PM
  #11
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jewelsb    
Are your horses put in a barn when lighting storms hit though? Maybe I can stick them in my garage for now lol
The people I got my mare from had her in a pasture for 6 years with no shelter and no trees and she's still alive, im still really worried though. Is there anything else I can do for now? I don't think my husband would really let me hold the horses up in the garage:/
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They are now but when I first bought the ranch there wasn't a barn to put them in. They would all huddle with their heads down and I was scared to death for a a whole year. But, as the poster above said it doesn't happen very often and yes, it is usually fatal because it would require an immediate countershock to the heart just like in people it typically causes fibrillation in the heart. Good news though we are heading towards winter and in Missouri there are a lot fewer thunder storms until spring. Right now its the aftermath of Isaac and a few weeks ago all that electricity in the storm was a bit extreme for the kind of thunderstorms we normally see. BTW if you are not from Missouri watch out for ice this winter...we tend to get a lot more ice than snow compared to some parts of the country..if your horses are shod they just might end up skating across the pasture ..
     
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    09-01-2012, 05:44 PM
  #12
Weanling
^^^ I got was here last winter and was disappointed with getting nearly no snow! They are barefoot, thanks for thewarning though I will need to remember that. The lightning was also MUCH worse last year here. I thought this year has been quite calm so far.
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    09-01-2012, 05:51 PM
  #13
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jewelsb    
Well sounds like I need to look into lightning rods. Do I just need one for the entire farm?
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Mainly for structures you don't want to burn when hit.

A friend's barn got hit & it had the rods but the rods weren't hit. She knew it happened because it blew out a lightbulb in her house. The barn roof started on fire but it was raining so hard it put itself out.
The scary thing about lightening is no one can predict what it will do.
I would talk to neighbors & see what they say about it.
     
    09-01-2012, 05:54 PM
  #14
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jewelsb    
^^^ I got was here last winter and was disappointed with getting nearly no snow! They are barefoot, thanks for thewarning though I will need to remember that. The lightning was also MUCH worse last year here. I thought this year has been quite calm so far.
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yep, def with the drought it has been waay more quiet. My kids were complaining too last winter ..that is until they got out of school in the beginning of May because no snow days were used haha oh bare foot...they probably won't have much of a problem unless we get an ice storm but those are not often...beautiful but treacherous and no one living or on wheels does well then till it melts a bit.
     
    09-01-2012, 05:59 PM
  #15
Weanling
Well doubt my neighbors are all too worried one lady has 15 horses on 20 acres no slelter but a couple trees. The other has no livestock. I guess I should stop being so worried too but can't help it.
I don't like ice but snow is welcomed anytime!
So apparently lightning rods don't always work:/
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    09-01-2012, 06:00 PM
  #16
Trained
Lightning rods are stainless steel rods mounted on the highest point in your working area, then a copper ground wire is run from that down to the ground and buried for about 6 feet long, below the frost line (here that means at bedrock or 4 feet if possible).

The tricky part is that if you have a metal roof, you have to ensure that the rod and the ground cable do not touch the metal. Mostly, we would mount the rod on a wooden extension that was available for the hay track, then run the cable down the side of the barn.

Lightning rods provide the easiest +/- open line for the lightning to travel. Lightning is like water -- it will always travel the easiest route.
     
    09-01-2012, 06:11 PM
  #17
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by natisha    
Mainly for structures you don't want to burn when hit.
since you are trying to protect the pasture...I have participated in the Med crew during PGA tournies ..maybe contact some of the larger golf courses in Mo I know they have lightning rod;s to protect the fields but do not have any idea how the set up works..maybe they can give you a referral. Good luck!
     

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