How Do You Know: Teeth Floating
   

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How Do You Know: Teeth Floating

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  • Symtoms if horse teeth are bothering them
  • How can i tell if 3 year old shetalnds teeth need floating

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    09-12-2012, 11:58 AM
  #1
Weanling
How Do You Know: Teeth Floating

Forgive me, we're new to horse ownership.

How do you know when to call an equine dentist to get a horse's teeth floated?

We've owned our mare since April 2012 (we leased her from September 2011 - April 2012). She has not had her teeth floated in this time. The previous owner did have it done while she was at our barn...but my BO does not remember the date.

So my questions:
- what are signs/behaviors a horse exhibits when it's teeth are bothering her?
- how often should I anticipate getting this done?

Acey is a pleasure QH. She is ridden by my 9 year old in play days, open shows (English flat work, rail, Showmansip, WP), and on trail rides. She is pasture boarded, free fed hay, and gets two scoops of 14% grain daily (I think).

Thank you for your help!
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    09-12-2012, 12:10 PM
  #2
Started
Here's an article on dental care. The Horse | Equine Dental Care is More Than Just Floating Teeth

Some horses need floated every six months, many can go a year or two. Signs you need an appointment soon are:

If the line where the front teeth meets slants from one side of the mouth to the other.

There are sharp points on the molars. You can sometimes ease your finger in along the cheek and feel the outside edges of the cheek teeth. The sharp points will be on the top teeth.
The horse is missing a tooth. If so, the opposing tooth has nothing to wear against, which can cause serious problems if not adequately maintained.

You can also have your vet check her teeth when she gets a checkup or shots.
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    09-12-2012, 12:17 PM
  #3
Super Moderator
Loosing condition
Dropping feed when she eats
Struggling to eat hay - not eating enough or taking longer than seems normal
Unhappy with her bit
Throwing her head about when ridden and not liking contact with her mouth
Really sharp teeth can make the sides of the tongue sore
I'm not going to tell you to check to see if her teeth feel uneven or sharp as if not done correctly could result in a crushed finger or three
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    09-12-2012, 12:22 PM
  #4
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
I'm not going to tell you to check to see if her teeth feel uneven or sharp as if not done correctly could result in a crushed finger or three
Very good point. I only have a couple that I check this way.
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    09-12-2012, 12:30 PM
  #5
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaydee    
Loosing condition
Dropping feed when she eats
Struggling to eat hay - not eating enough or taking longer than seems normal
Unhappy with her bit
Throwing her head about when ridden and not liking contact with her mouth
Really sharp teeth can make the sides of the tongue sore
I'm not going to tell you to check to see if her teeth feel uneven or sharp as if not done correctly could result in a crushed finger or three
Hmm... I noticed her dropping a little grain this weekend and she's been shaking her head when being ridden. We've been working to find the right bit thinking the bit was the problem, but I'm becoming more suspicious it's her teeth.

I don't know if those are enough symptoms, but I'm going to ask the BO to get her checked. I guess the worst that can happen is I have to pay for a call I don't need. :)
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    09-12-2012, 12:32 PM
  #6
Started
Never be disappointed when you pay for good news! If they don't need done, that's one thing you've ruled out.
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    09-12-2012, 12:43 PM
  #7
Green Broke
It's not just the teeth having sharp points, they also need to have full range of motion of their jaw. Since it's been at least a year if not longer since they were last done I would have the vet out to check, there's a good chance they need to be floated.
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    09-12-2012, 12:59 PM
  #8
Foal
Check and see if your veterinarian can float her teeth. I've shadowed a vet that went on a barn call for a dental visit once. The Equine dentist couldn't sedate the horse, so they had to pay for both the vet and the dentist to be there. My vet does my mares' teeth and he is wonderful. I lucked out with having a vet with such a great background as mine. I suggest looking into it. It may not be an option in your area, but it definitely may save you some cash.
     
    09-12-2012, 01:02 PM
  #9
Weanling
Thanks Ninja, I know one of the equine vets in my area does it. I'll try to give him a call today.

So, next question...should I haul the horse to the vet or ask for a barn call?
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    09-12-2012, 01:06 PM
  #10
Green Broke
Because the sediation will take a while to wear off it would be easiest to have the vet come to you. And my vet also does teeth too, it's pretty convienent.
     

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