How are her hooves? - Page 3
 
 

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How are her hooves?

This is a discussion on How are her hooves? within the Horse Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Horses category
  • Wild brumbies fraser island hooves

 
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    03-21-2011, 11:35 AM
  #21
Started
Quote:
Originally Posted by loosie    
Sorry, but from what I've seen 'in nature', that doesn't generally hold up. Depends how hard the surface, etc. The brumbies of Fraser Island(Queensland sand island) and also of South Western Australia(sand country) that I've seen tend to have quite overgrown, flared feet.
not that flares are a good thing generally speaking, but in a way wouldn't they benefit horses that live/move the majority of their time in sand? Almost like paddles to give more push/traction/momentum (if you follow my thought process here).

I have no idea if that's really how it is - just a random theory. :)
     
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    03-21-2011, 03:34 PM
  #22
Weanling
Flares are never a good thing. They indicate stretching of the white line and hoof wall separation.
     
    03-21-2011, 04:14 PM
  #23
Yearling
How much jumping etc do you do lola? When you road hack this year do you plan on doing much or going over long distances?
     
    03-21-2011, 04:26 PM
  #24
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by RATHER BE RIDING    
Flares are never a good thing. They indicate stretching of the white line and hoof wall separation.
exactly
     
    03-21-2011, 05:13 PM
  #25
Started
Sorry - having a scientific/research job I tend to think a bit outside the box.
     
    03-21-2011, 11:59 PM
  #26
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by crimsonsky    
not that flares are a good thing generally speaking, but in a way wouldn't they benefit horses that live/move the majority of their time in sand? Almost like paddles to give more push/traction/momentum (if you follow my thought process here).

I have no idea if that's really how it is - just a random theory. :)
No, not flares, but longer walls might be beneficial for a horse that lives on truly soft ground. In the last issue of "The Horse's Hoof" magazine (a barefoot mag) some trimmers noted wild horses that lived in soft/wet conditions tended to have longer walls naturally, without chipping, cracking, or flaring. It was an interesting perspective.
     
    03-22-2011, 12:52 AM
  #27
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by RATHER BE RIDING    
Flares are never a good thing. They indicate stretching of the white line and hoof wall separation.
I agree that it's not beneficial *if* the horse is to be expected to do anything on firmer ground, but not sure that it's *necessarily* a bad thing, for those horses in that environment, or that it necessarily means stretching & separation. But so saying, haven't really looked into it much at all.... meant to, just not being relevant to my environs & so many other things to study too.... When I first saw those pics of WA horses and thought back to my (pre-any idea about hooves) trip to Fraser Island, I was very surprised at the state of them(having a more idealistic idea about feral horse feet back then), but from memory(was a fair few years ago) I thought the hooves looked otherwise reasonably healthy & well attached, just that the excess walls had flared rather than broken away because of the soft ground.
     
    03-22-2011, 06:01 AM
  #28
Weanling
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggiStar    
How much jumping etc do you do lola? When you road hack this year do you plan on doing much or going over long distances?
Well she would get jumped maybe 3 times a week. Or more depending on how busy me or the other people who ride her are. When I plan on going on the road it will only be very short..I mean like 5 minutes down the road and then we will go into a forest...The longest on the road would be an hour or two.
     
    03-22-2011, 12:01 PM
  #29
Yearling
If your surface is corrosive and you would be do doing hard jumping ie not 2cross poles an hour, then shoes are advised due to the stress based on the front feet causes them to chip away and wear to quickly.
However I think you should try no shoes just get your farrier to remove them for the time being and see how she adjusts if it doesnt go wel just get them put back on.
I have never heard of barefoot farriers here so your usual farrier should be fine
     
    03-23-2011, 12:59 AM
  #30
Trained
I would say that if you're jumping, particularly on unyielding ground, then shoes are contraindicated due to excessive vibrations of the steel and force on the walls.
     

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