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How often does your horse lie down?

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  • White horses in a stall lying down sick
  • White horse lay down

 
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    02-01-2009, 04:00 PM
  #31
Weanling
my baby lays down at night and around 11:00 every day like wheni show up at 3 in the morning for a show he's laying down.
     
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    02-01-2009, 05:11 PM
  #32
Yearling


See why im always A nervous wreck.. HAHA farah was really sleepy while I was out clipping the goat's hooves...She decided to lay down. Silly girl
     
    02-01-2009, 07:21 PM
  #33
Trained
That's a cute pic, Lacyloo -- looks like Farah was trying to make a snow angel in the sand!
     
    02-01-2009, 11:05 PM
  #34
Foal
I don't see my white horse lay down, but I know he does it every night in his stall because of all of the dirty marks all over him

Why do the white horses always like to roll and make a mess of themselves?

My younger horse seems to lay down about every other day.
     
    02-06-2009, 05:01 PM
  #35
Weanling
Just 3 days after I brought my new gelding home I found him cast in his stall...scared the living daylights out of me!!!!!! :( So from then on I always worry if he's still standing in his stall at night. There for a while I was going out to check on him probably every 30 mins or so. But he's been fine ever since and hasn't done it again. I've never seen him lay down during the day while he's in the pasture (he's too busy eating or chasing cows lol) but I know for a fact that he lays down in his stall at night. He always seems to smell like poo poo when I turn him out in the morning-It's from him laying in his stall in his own piles! I too am a worry-wart and tend to be paranoid about these kinds of things, but horses do need to relax. Just because they lay down or roll around doesn't mean they are going to colic. My horses love to roll! There's nothing wrong with worrying, just don't worry TOO much! Take care :)
     
    02-06-2009, 08:31 PM
  #36
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by qtina626    
Why do the white horses always like to roll and make a mess of themselves?
Just because they're white

     
    02-06-2009, 09:03 PM
  #37
Green Broke
My horses come in at night and everyone will lay down at least once during the night.

They all MIGHT lay down once during the day.

That being said, two years ago my then 19 yo TWH started laying down a lot in the early spring.

In my infinite wisdom I thought he was laying down to take in the warm spring sun and that he was getting older and just wanted to lay down. All my current horses have historically had extra lay down time in the spring warmth.

That was NOT what was happening with my 19 yo. He was sick with Equine Metabolic Syndrome. It took him losing around 80 pounds in 6-8 weeks time for me to smarten up and get the vet out. Fortunately he never foundered.

He is now 21 and is back to lying down his normal amount of time but, like you, I am a nervous wreck and I time how long he lies down if I am home.

I think I should probably work every day instead of part time so I don't monitor his rest time. It would save me from needing a salt lick full of Zanex
     
    02-07-2009, 09:07 AM
  #38
Trained
I totally understand WITW -- I guess we'll find a balance.
     
    02-07-2009, 07:45 PM
  #39
Foal
My stdb slept 45 minutes every day around 11, and in the summer again around 1:30 he made the appaloosa stand gaurd. I only every caught her sleeping in her stall at night. I can only echo the advice you're getting. Horses do need rest. And it is a good idea to moniter how often, and generally when. You don't really have to worry unless it changes.
Things you can keep an eye on is rolling after sleeping, or wanting to run around and jump after rolling resting. Those activities combined with seeming to be annoyed with their stomachs can suggest trouble. Try to watch and make sure they are not wanting to roll soon after a heavy meal.
Real young and older horses naturally lay down more than others. And most importantly, remember colic can be beaten if caught early. Know the signs and know what to do, and keep them drinking water.
     

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