How to stop wasting hay without a hay net.
   

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How to stop wasting hay without a hay net.

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  • Horse digestion small mesh hay nets
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    04-07-2013, 07:19 PM
  #1
Foal
How to stop wasting hay without a hay net.

Hello,

We are fostering a TB that we need to get weight on. We don't want to use a hay net/nibble net because we don't want to limit her intake.
We were looking around tractor supply and they have (i think they were over 30 gallons) oval "tuff" tubs. Would that be okay to feed her hay out of? It wont keep her from pulling it out, but it'll keep her from pawing at it and spreading it everywhere.

My dad was talking about building a box in the corner with no top and a cut out on the front to where she can eat out of it.

Any ideas?

We are also fighting getting weight on her. I know its a very slow process. She's getting 2-3 flakes of T/A three times a day (sometimes she doesnt finish the lunch one so we will only give an extra flake or so to tide her overnight) she also gets an unlimited supply of tifton for munching. 3/4 of Seminole senior three times a day and Focus HF supplement, topped with some corn oil. Any thing safe for TBs that's no sugar to help even further?

Thank you in advance.
     
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    04-07-2013, 07:22 PM
  #2
Yearling
Have you treated her for hindgut acidosis/ulcers? That is my first suspicion on a hard to keep TB especially.


Id think a tub would work fine unless she's a hay flinger.
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    04-07-2013, 07:52 PM
  #3
Foal
Not to my knowledge. She's only been here two weeks, and was only on site at the rescue for two months before that. So I can only imagine that she's been through tons of stress. She's been seen by a local vet and even had surgery to remove some small bone chips, and I don't think he even mentioned ulcers.

Is there an OTC supplement we can try?... Or is it something I need to get the doc out here for? It stresses me out big time because I don't want to watch her wither away in front of our eyes.
     
    04-07-2013, 08:07 PM
  #4
Started
I actually take a big muck bucket, the ones with the rope handles, take a two sided hook and hook it to the fence and put our mares hay in there. 2 flakes fit well and then I refill throughout the day. Keeps her from eating dirt and sand. Also the hay bags with the head hole in them rather than nets work well too. I use those in the winter.
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    04-07-2013, 08:10 PM
  #5
Foal
I used Chia seeds (2 oz daily for 8 days) and Slippery Elm Bark powder (1 1/2 tablespoons 2x daily for 30 days) together to treat my horse for ulcers. He's still on the Slippery Elm but showed great improvement after just a few days. A Slippery Elm/Aloe Vera Juice combo also works great (from what I've read).

I used a big bin to feed hay to my horse but he just tossed it out all the time so now I use a slow feed hay net (very good for their digestion). He used to gobble down his hay in 20-30 mins but now it takes him 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

Has the horse been wormed?
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    04-07-2013, 08:22 PM
  #6
Showing
Small mesh hay nets help a horse gain wait, the reason being by limiting the intake at each bite it goes thro the system slower than when a horse sends a large mouthful down. The faster in the faster it goes thro the horse. Whether she is stalled or wintering in a pasture give her two nets. In the stall hang them in opposite corners to keep the horse moving back and forth. In the pasture space them as far apart as is feasible for you. If this horse was ever on the race track they usually have ulcers. If this horse is alone, build a feeder from a sheet of plywood with small sides to scatter the pellets on. The larger surface slows how fast the pellets go in and horses love to nibble them. Again, better digestion.
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    04-07-2013, 08:43 PM
  #7
Foal
I wormed her with strongid 5 days ago... Now that I'm hearing ulcers thrown around, I'm wondering if it was the right thing to do.

She was only ever a jumper. Never ran at a track.

Saddlebag, I never thought of it that way. I come from the world of greyhounds, and we feed raw, so quantity was always most important as the quality of the food didnt change (since we don't feed kibble).

Is there a brand of nets that you would recommend?... I was looking at the nibble nets pretty heavily before we committed to a horse.

Rusty, where do you get the chia seeds and slippery elm?
     
    04-08-2013, 08:58 AM
  #8
Foal
I bought them from Epic Herbs on ebay. 1lb of each.
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    04-08-2013, 09:37 AM
  #9
Green Broke
Good job on the strongid, many people never rotate wormers, then have so called "hard keepers' wait a month then hit her with a Quest gel,
Hard keepers tend to come down to a few obvious issues that seems like people want to ignore. Instead they use a shot gun approach of supplements, oils and doodads.
Hard keepers routinely come down to a few basic issues, High calorie can mask some of them but don't solve the problem
Not enough grass or decent hay,,, this can be behavior as well if a very submissive horse is in with others and not getting its share.
Worms, giving a ivermectin 1.87 over and over is not "Worming" chemicals need to be rotated and especially an occasional strongid or quest gel OR get a fecal count done.
Bad teeth, if it aint chewed up it wont get digested and nutrients just get pooped out.
Ulcers, common in TB's
And rarely some kinda other medical condition.
     
    04-08-2013, 09:54 AM
  #10
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
Small mesh hay nets help a horse gain wait, the reason being by limiting the intake at each bite it goes thro the system slower than when a horse sends a large mouthful down. The faster in the faster it goes thro the horse. Whether she is stalled or wintering in a pasture give her two nets. In the stall hang them in opposite corners to keep the horse moving back and forth. In the pasture space them as far apart as is feasible for you. If this horse was ever on the race track they usually have ulcers. If this horse is alone, build a feeder from a sheet of plywood with small sides to scatter the pellets on. The larger surface slows how fast the pellets go in and horses love to nibble them. Again, better digestion.
^^^THAT!!!
I would only deworm after fecal testing and if necessary, I'd use either Equimax, Zimecterin Gold or Quest Plus to get possible tape worm, which doesn't show up in a sample.
The slowfeeder will greatly help her in any way...gaining, utilizing her feed, fighting possible ulcers and hind gut acidosis. You want to go low NSC/ high calorie/ highly digestible. Soaked alfalfa pellets for calories, flaxseed for overall health, an appropriate vit/min supply maybe in form of a ration balancer, or a good senior feed, like Triple Crown. Senior feed is highly digestible.
     

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